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Birth control vending machines installed in college campuses

romanigypsyeyesromanigypsyeyes Registered User Posts: 33,916 Senior Member
Students at the University of California, Davis have a new selection in their vending machines.

That late night or early morning contraceptive need now has a quick fix.

UC Davis is offering students the morning after pill, condoms, and pregnancy tests inside the convenience of a vending machine on campus.

Good. It's about time. Birth control pills should be in there too (though I encourage all women who don't want a pregnancy to use something more effective than the pill but still).* I'd prefer these be free but I know there are other places on many campuses where they all can be obtained for free.

http://www.king5.com/news/health/birth-control-vending-machines-installed-in-college-campuses/451671842


*There is NO medical reason why the pill is prescription-only.
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Replies to: Birth control vending machines installed in college campuses

  • paul2752paul2752 Registered User Posts: 5,121 Senior Member
    I really do hope that they keep the uhm...their used purchase items in their rooms.
  • doschicosdoschicos Registered User Posts: 19,982 Senior Member
    I think some screening for birth control pills are warranted although a full physical, pap smear, and pelvic exam are not warranted. I think this is a good compromise:
    http://www.pharmacytimes.com/contributor/sally-rafie-pharmd/2017/02/colorado-is-third-state-allowing-pharmacists-to-prescribe-birth-control
  • 3scoutsmom3scoutsmom Registered User Posts: 5,719 Senior Member
    *There is NO medical reason why the pill is prescription-only

    @romanigypsyeyes you're not a fan of Call the Mid Wives are you?
  • doschicosdoschicos Registered User Posts: 19,982 Senior Member
    edited June 2017
    I do think oral contraceptives have come a LONG way from the Call the Midwives timeframe, however, even in recent times there have been issues. Yaz as an example.

    http://msmagazine.com/blog/2012/02/09/just-how-safe-is-yaz-women-need-to-know/
  • romanigypsyeyesromanigypsyeyes Registered User Posts: 33,916 Senior Member
    Never seen it. No interest. Do work in modern day sexual health though.

    There are risks but there are risks with all meds. The pill is sold over the counter in many, many countries without a problem.

    It's just another barrier.
  • 3scoutsmom3scoutsmom Registered User Posts: 5,719 Senior Member
    Seriously? DD takes the pill and has had issues and had to have dosages and type adjusted more than once - do you think a vending machince can do this? There are MANY drugs available over the counter over seas that are perscription in the US. Want high schoolers to get Acutaine without a perscreption - it's just for acne after all.... Heck in
    some contries optiates are legale.
  • 3scoutsmom3scoutsmom Registered User Posts: 5,719 Senior Member
    edited June 2017
    Thank God my daughter's doctor doesn't agree with you!
  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone Registered User Posts: 21,454 Senior Member
    Why would someone buy them from a vending machine when they are free from the pharmacy? All insurance has to cover them and in some states they are also 100% free even if there is no insurance.

    I wouldn't trust that someone who buys them from a vending machine would know that they don't work instantly, that you have to take pills for a month, at the same time every day, that they interact with other medicines (antibiotics). My daughter likes to be on the schedule where she only gets 2-3 periods a year so was happy to discuss that with a doctor and get her prescription set up that way.

    My kids haven't taken a lot of antibiotics in their lives, but D had strep throat and of course had to do a round. I woke up in a panic when I realized her birth control might be ineffective and texted her. The nurse had warned her because the nurse knew she was on b.c. Now, the nurse could have asked, but didn't have to because there it was in D's chart.
  • 3scoutsmom3scoutsmom Registered User Posts: 5,719 Senior Member
    edited June 2017
    @romanigypsyeyes you are likely too young to know about "Thalidomide Babies" you might learn something from the Call the Mid Wives show. It was an over the counter drug in Germany and perscridebd without testing in the UK because it was an OTC drug in Germany. My 7th/8th grade science teacher was adopted from the UK and was a Thalidomine baby. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thalidomide

    You admit YAZ is "different" how is a vending machine to know that?
  • Jamrock411Jamrock411 Registered User Posts: 499 Member
    edited June 2017
    Doctor's Advice
    Published:Saturday | June 24, 2017 | 6:00 AM


    Question: I want to go on the Pill, Doc, but my mom is trying to prevent me.

    She says I shouldn't take it because I have something mysterious called Hughes' Syndrome. I did not realize this. It seems like it runs in the family. What do you think, Doc? Could I take the Pill?

    Answer: Well, Hughes' Syndrome (also known as 'sticky blood syndrome' or 'anti-phospholipid syndrome') is quite common and it is good that your mother told you about it.

    It was first described by Dr Graham Hughes, who noticed a number of cases in Jamaica in 1974. Since then, it's been found all over the world. It is characterized by recurrent miscarriages and repeated clotting (thrombosis). In fact, the risk of clotting is so great that, alas, a young woman like you should never go on the Pill!

    The oral contraceptive is fine for most young women, but not for you. Don't try it.

    I think you should now see a medical expert to have your Hughes' Syndrome investigated. As far as contraception is concerned, you need to use some other method that will not give you clots. Good luck.
  • Sue22Sue22 Registered User Posts: 6,046 Senior Member
    ^The patient has Hughes syndrome, a serious autoimmune disorder, and neither her mother nor her doctor bothered to tell her until she was of age to become sexually active?! She is not being given the recommended treatment for APS/Hughes patients who have not yet experienced an acute clot? What kind of medical care is this kid getting?

    Is this from a real medical advice column?
  • SybyllaSybylla Registered User Posts: 3,319 Senior Member
    edited June 2017
    The real consideration is the context of the potential dangers of the pill(S) vs the very real dangers of pregnancy. Take your (for e.g). random syndrome exacerbated by the pill and compare it with your random syndrome (or lack thereof) in an unplanned pregnancy with a potential lack of prenatal care. I can buy the morning after pill on the internet. We need this for contraceptives, period. Pregnancy isn't some abstract notion, it is dangerous work. The scary bit isn't just getting a healthy baby out at the end, it is the in between and the unhealthy baby and mother, or much worse. A lack of free access to free contraceptives is the American way of punishing women for being sexually active.
  • utex2011utex2011 Registered User Posts: 55 Junior Member
    A lack of free access to free contraceptives is the American way of punishing women for being sexually active.

    Who is going to pay for the "free" contraceptives?
This discussion has been closed.