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To loft or not to loft the dorm bed?

katenskatens 13 replies17 threads Junior Member
Hi, so I'm actually a senior in high school but I'm trying to plan out supplies and decorations (etc) for next year. I'm stuck in whether or not I would want my bed lofted.

On one hand, it saves a lot of storage space so you can add other stuff and looks cool. However on the other hand, I've heard that it gets annoying at night and sleepy to use steps, and when you have visitors they can't sit on your bed. I've also heard that a lot of people do it and then have to get it switched back part way through the year because it's so annoying.

Opinions?
16 replies
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Replies to: To loft or not to loft the dorm bed?

  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 80204 replies720 threads Senior Member
    Unless you know the living arrangements at the college you will attend, then you will not know if bunk beds are not possible, optional, or effectively required due to space limitations.

    There was a single issue poster on these forums who posted about the risk of falling out of the top bunk bed that did not have rails.
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  • Tabitha18Tabitha18 78 replies1 threads Junior Member
    Assuming bunk beds are not required, I'd prefer NOT to loft the dorm bed, for reasons of practicality:

    - you can sit on the bed to do some of the homework (after you're tired of siting on the chair for a long time) or watch a movie, etc.

    - easier to change bed sheets

    - you can sit on the bed to put on your shoes (very minor detail, I know)

    - and as you mentioned, no place for visitors to sit on when they visit.

    My son didn't do lofted bed since he doesn't have a lot of stuffs. He put his luggage under the bed along with the clothes he doesn't need right away (i.e. winter clothes) so there's some space saving there.

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  • momofsenior1momofsenior1 8769 replies83 threads Senior Member
    Do you already know the dimensions of your exact room? If not, hold off.

    My D ended up having to loft her bed freshman year because she was in a triple room with 4 girls, so they absolutely needed the space. This year when she was in a regular double, she and her roommate choose to just raise the beds instead of lofting. They can still fit stuff underneath for storage but it's much easier getting in and out of bed. She will not loft next year either.
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  • EconPopEconPop 497 replies8 threads Member
    edited December 2019
    When I was a freshman an ice age ago, one of the reasons we lofted our beds was to make room for a couch, coffee table and chairs, like a living room set up. Much more comfortable for guests than our beds.

    I was actually against the idea when my roommate brought it up. However, it turned out to be the best idea ever. I loved our loft set up.
    edited December 2019
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  • mommdcmommdc 11782 replies31 threads Senior Member
    At both of my kids' colleges they have XL twin beds that can be raised to about 30 inches off the floor. That is high enough to store some items under the bed.
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  • eb23282eb23282 694 replies19 threads Member
    EconPop wrote: »
    When I was a freshman an ice age ago, one of the reasons we lofted our beds was to make room for a couch, coffee table and chairs, like a living room set up. Much more comfortable for guests than our beds.

    Ditto for me. So many people used lofts because it gave you so much more space - never heard a complaint.

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  • suzyQ7suzyQ7 4042 replies57 threads Senior Member
    Slightly lofted is perfect- enough to fit the 2-3 drawer dresser or plastic storage drawers but low enough to get on without much effort. The underbed Storage makes a HUGE difference.
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  • happy1happy1 23351 replies2312 threads Senior Member
    edited December 2019
    Too early to decide. Some rooms have bunk beds, some colleges do not allow lofting of beds. Some dorm rooms have plenty of storage space without lofting beds, others do not. Wait and see where you end up.

    It is understandable that you are excited about college but don't get too far ahead of yourself.
    edited December 2019
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  • momtogirls2momtogirls2 906 replies7 threads Member
    I agree with too early to focus on - wait to you find out realistic options. Some college rooms have bunk beds with no option to separate, some you can't loft etc. While most colleges seem to have xl beds some have traditional twin size. Basically don't spend much thought on room set up for now until you know where you are actually living.

    My daughter's freshman room had the partial lofted beds - she needed a step stool to easily get in and out of bed. There was very little available space under the bed though because the dresser was below the bed. My freshman year we had two high lofts with our desks and bureau's underneath - the beds had to remain high lofts - for one - they were build that way and couldn't be unlofted and 2 there was no additional space.
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  • tkoparenttkoparent 308 replies6 threads Member
    My son's bed is partially lofted - they call it "captain's height," which leaves room for storage underneath and is quite comfortable. He didn't like the idea of fully lofted, which would have enabled him to put the desk under the bed, for all the reasons cited above. I agree you shouldn't spend too much time thinking about this right now, although it's helpful to mull it over a little. Once our son knew where he was going, we were able to look at some online photos, and that was helpful in thinking about the issue in more concrete terms.
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  • milgymfammilgymfam 1212 replies21 threads Senior Member
    edited December 2019
    My daughter’s bed is slightly lofted, about 12 inches. With the regular frame legs it gives her about 18-20 inches under the bed for storage. Lots of space to store stuff and no need for stairs or anything to get into the bed. Her room is a single but pretty tiny, and storage under the bed was essential.
    edited December 2019
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  • RichInPittRichInPitt 1916 replies31 threads Senior Member
    My D lofted hers is a typical Freshman tiny cube room and I can’t imagine not doing it, unless you want to sit on your bed a lot. There would have been almost no other floor space with the bed and desk on the floor. Lofted, she put her desk and a futon underneath.

    Lofted beds were required to have a railing so falling out wasn’t an issue, and a thin ladder wasn’t a problem for her.

    In her dorm, I saw at least 80% lofted as she was moving in.
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  • collboy23collboy23 17 replies2 threads Junior Member
    First semester of my freshman year (just finished) and I shared a room with 3 other roommates. All had lifted beds with our desk installed under. At first the idea of a lofted bed was cool until you have to go to the bathroom in the middle of the night and falling off your latter in the dark. I also dropped my laptop off the bed which was not good and changing the sheets was actually a whole planned out thing. Don’t loft if you don’t need to!
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  • juilletjuillet 12724 replies162 threads Super Moderator
    Through summer programs and such I've slept in all three types of beds - regular, captain's style, and fully lofted. My take is that there are pros and cons to each setup and it really depends on how much storage and living space you otherwise have in your room.

    With lofted, a huge downside is not being able to sit up in your bed - which I sometimes like to do with my laptop. It's not as egregious if you have a nice reclining/comfortable spot in your room, and honestly sleep hygiene would say you shouldn't get into your bed until you're ready to sleep in it, anyway.

    I think the captain's style was my favorite, since it was big enough to shove my dresser and a couple of other storage solutions underneath it, but was still low enough that I could sit up in bed.
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  • bopperbopper 14309 replies101 threadsForum Champion CWRU Forum Champion
    edited January 21
    1) Some colleges won't allow you to loft your bed

    2) Do you often have to go to the bathroom in the middle of the night?

    3) Do sit at your desk in your bedroom at home? or do you sit on your bed? If you hang out on your bed at home, you won't want a lofted bed.

    4) If you do loft your bed, make sure to have a bed rail. This is the story of a CCers son who rolled out of a 7-foot lofted bed in January of 2015 and almost died from a brain injury and stroke that required brain surgery. He spent 10 weeks in a coma and has spent the last 16 months of his life learning EVERYTHING all over again (swallowing, talking, eating, walking, using the bathroom...everything). Please consider using a safety rail on your bed!

    https://talk.collegeconfidential.com/parents-forum/1911839-bunk-and-loft-bed-dangers-p1.html
    edited January 21
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  • cshell2cshell2 899 replies10 threads Member
    At both of DS's top choice schools the beds are pre-lofted. If you don't want them that way you have to lower them yourself. From what I can tell on tours most have them lofted...although in one dorm we were in I thought they were insanely close to the ceiling and would bang their heads for awhile until they learned.
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