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Should I give up and get my degree already in anything?

rodzstephanie214rodzstephanie214 Registered User Posts: 5 New Member
I want to apply to Loyola Marymount University for the Fall of 2019 as a transfer student for my Junior year. I know the deadline is coming up. But my reason for posting this is, I want to apply also to other schools like UT Austin, NCSU and TAMU, also of course LMU.
I applied to those above mentioned to the engineering programs of Civil Engineering. BUT thing is that I do not meet all the prerequisites nor do I seem competitive.
I still need Physics - Chemistry II - Calc I - Calc 2
I have taken only up to trigonometry (currently taking precalculus and calculus this spring semester. I have chemistry I with an A and my general ed courses done. That's about it, with a 3.5 GPA.
And I know depending where I go, not all the courses will transfer.
Can I still get in with maybe a pre major into engineering? I asked an advisor at my school and she hardly answered my questions. I also asked if I could just get into any of those schools with a pre major and she looked at me crazy. I know Texas Tech University has pre-engineering majors.
Or do I take a gap year with possibly not even getting in to any engineering programs? I am already 23, I took a 4 year gap after HS.
Do I just finish my degree and forget it? As you can see I am not confident in my ability to even get into any engineering programs let alone any of the schools I mentioned. So far I have gotten into UNT for Information Technology as a PRE-Information Technology major It falls in the computer science/engineering sector at their school ABET credited. Which is in the engineering department but I think anyone with a decent GPA can get into their engineering programs. Also IT seems easier than say EE o/r ME.
Should I even bother? Also, during high school I barely graduated with the minimum credits which required me to go to community college. I failed all math and science courses many times because I never paid attention or showed up to class. So I struggle as if I am learning everything NOT RElearning. I only passed because of pity from my teachers lol and the school was really bad and wanted me out.

Replies to: Should I give up and get my degree already in anything?

  • DustyfeathersDustyfeathers Registered User Posts: 3,253 Senior Member
    I can't figure out what you're asking. Maybe that's why no one has commented.

    Perhaps simplify your question so that others can help you.

    Paragraphs are also nice
  • collegemom3717collegemom3717 Registered User Posts: 5,812 Senior Member
    First, last and always is $$: can you afford all of the places that you have listed- especially if (as is likely) it will take you 3+ years to graduate.

    Engineering is perhaps the most likely major to require 5 years to complete, b/c there are so many pre-requisites. If you are certain of civil engineering, and you can get an A in calc this spring w/o pain (w/ work, ofc, but not pain) you *can* get there.

    Look at your in-state (ABET) engineering options. Spend some time reading the details in the Engineering sections: what classes are required to complete the CivEng major? what are the requirements for transferring in (specific coursework, grades, standardized testing)? what are the timelines, and how do they fit with the classes you have taken? (usually you will find 'typical' 4 year plans on the websites)

    Also, do they allow mid-year transfers? You are going to be a stronger engineering transfer applicant with Calc I completed (even better: take Physics and Calc II over the summer and get strong marks; sign up for Chem II for the autumn term). That would put you in good shape to transfer in the autumn, to start next spring.

    Narrow down the affordable choices and go visit at least one- make an appointment to talk to somebody in engineering admissions. Get advice directly from them.
  • rodzstephanie214rodzstephanie214 Registered User Posts: 5 New Member
    I guess what I am asking for are responses on whether I should wait another year to apply to the engineering program for UT Austin or any of those schools or should I just try and continue my education to graduate with any degree because I am 23 years old already and have never had a real job.


    I still live with my grandparents and if I wait another year for a possibility of entering the engineering program, I would set myself back 4 years to graduate! Because it takes 3 years to graduate in the engineering program as a transfer student, plus the year I waited to reapply makes 4 years which then I will be 27 barely with a bachelors degree.


    When I think about it, it doesn't seem worth it because I am bad at holding jobs while going to school too because of the heavy math and sciences I have to take.
  • rodzstephanie214rodzstephanie214 Registered User Posts: 5 New Member
    edited February 7
    @Dustyfeathers
    Yea I am really confusing. I guess none of this really makes sense but thanks for commenting.
  • aquaptaquapt Registered User Posts: 1,628 Senior Member
    edited February 8
    There are far worse things than graduating at 27 with an engineering degree! Just keep moving forward and focus on getting a really strong foundation in your calc and physics classes.

    I agree with collegemom that a mid-year transfer next year might be ideal.
    You are in-state in Texas?

    One parameter you might want to consider when looking at transfer schools is the age distribution of the students. You might feel better about your experience, and enjoy it more, at a school with a higher percentage of students in their mid-20's and older. Examples (that offer civil engineering):
    University of Houston: 50% of students are 25 and older
    UT-Arlington: 49% are 25 and older
    Portland State U (OR) 36% are 25 or older

    LMU does take spring transfers. (Oct. 1st application deadline.) So do UT-Austin and UT-Arlington, also with a 10/1 deadline. (Portland State, not that you've expressed any interest but fwiw, accepts transfers for any of its four quarters.) NC State has a spring admissions cycle but not for engineering.

    For U of Houston, it looks as if your route in would be via the pre-engineering major in Civil Engineering at the Clear Lake campus (where 51% of the students are age 25+): https://www.uhcl.edu/academics/degrees/pre-engineering-civil-specialization It appears as if you could transfer into that program this summer or fall, and then transition to the downtown campus the following fall... but of course speak with an advisor there to get the full/accurate picture if you are interested.
  • KnowsstuffKnowsstuff Registered User Posts: 2,140 Senior Member
    First get checked out for adhd. Maybe I am overstepping boundaries but something you say lead to that. Life is long and your young. You can do anything you want but you need to focus and be determined. Being an engineer has nothing to do with being the smartest. You have to want it. Also you have to be realistic UT is hard for anyone to get into. Look at websites and see what program you can get into. Look at their prequisites. Make a goal and go for it.

    Call the schools and talk to their counselors or email them. They won't lead you on. They want successful students. I don't think my next fall but maybe by next winter semester?

    Again the smartest kids don't make it through engineering.. It's the more determined kids that succeed. If you want it bad enough then make it happen.
  • happymomof1happymomof1 Registered User Posts: 28,713 Senior Member
    Where are you studying now? Are you at a community college, or are you at a four-year institution?

    In either case, get yourself to the advising and counseling center and get some help sorting through your issues and options. You do not need to try to do this on your own.

    Why do you want a four year degree? Why engineering or tech majors? Explore those questions too.
  • juilletjuillet Super Moderator Posts: 12,646 Super Moderator
    23 isn't that old. If you want to be an engineer, then go ahead and try to get the prerequisites.

    I wouldn't recommend trying to transfer somewhere else as pre-engineering if you don't get into the major; if you try again and don't get admitted there, you'd have to transfer again. But I also wouldn't expect any engineering program to accept you without having the absolute most basic pre-engineering courses completed, so they can see your aptitude for the area.

    But only you can decide whether you'd rather wait to get into the major you really want, versus taking your second-choice major and finishing up. Neither is a wrong choice.
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