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Public v Private

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Replies to: Public v Private

  • whatisbusinesswhatisbusiness Registered User Posts: 59 Junior Member
    Avoid anything with the words UMass on it
  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Forum Champion Financial Aid, Forum Champion Alabama Posts: 84,614 Forum Champion
    Quote:
    My opinion (I haven't attended any college so this is just based off of what I've heard and researched) is that it is the average public schools job to ensure that the kids of a state (which ever the college is in) have the opportunity to go to college.



    Keep in mind that most/all states have more than one public univ.

    Your premise seems to be that a state flagship has a "come one, come all" attitude, but in reality, they don't. The less-strong students in the state are more likely doing one of the following: not going to college, starting at a CC, or going to their local directional state school.
  • sungoosesungoose Registered User Posts: 181 Junior Member
    In my experience as a Maryland high school student, my more high-achieving classmates are accepted to and attend UMD College Park, while the others attend the Baltimore County campus or Towson, for example. The smartest students are accepted to the honors program at College Park, which also separates the really serious students even more. A lot of students are rejected from Colleg Park, and you really have to apply Priority in order to have a chance to get in.
  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Forum Champion Financial Aid, Forum Champion Alabama Posts: 84,614 Forum Champion
    In my experience as a Maryland high school student, my more high-achieving classmates are accepted to and attend UMD College Park, while the others attend the Baltimore County campus or Towson, for example.


    I think that's very true for many. When I hear kids post that they don't want to go to their flagship because 75% of their public high school goes there, I don't believe it unless the flagship is in their hometown.

    The simple truth is that 75% of the parents of a typical public school's seniors don't have the money to send their kids away to college. More likely, no more than 10% are attending their sleep-away Flagship, some number are going away somewhere else, and the rest are commuting to a local CC or univ or not going to college at all.
  • teenbodybuilderteenbodybuilder Registered User Posts: 1,649 Senior Member
    I go to an average public high school in MD. Last year, only around 7-10 seniors went to UMD. Over 100 went to CC. Over 25 went into the military. Over 50 are entering the workforce. Classes are around 325 students each...

    This is at an upper-middle class school. #2 and #3 in the class went to an unknown LAC and Clemson, respectively. If I go to Miami, it'll be the #1 or #2 highest ranked school out if my class...
  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Forum Champion Financial Aid, Forum Champion Alabama Posts: 84,614 Forum Champion
    That's what I've seen. That's why when kids say "everyone" or "nearly everyone from my high school goes to" UWisc, UFlorida, Rutgers, or UFlagship, I don't believe it.

    some kids on CC have a flair for the dramatic or they think that what their own social group is doing represents the whole school.

    Even at my kids' good private high school, about half commuted to their local state school or CC. Lots of parents can't/won't pay for the 'sleep away' experience.
  • PiccoloMom1995PiccoloMom1995 Registered User Posts: 234 Junior Member
    My daughter is now a freshman at Emory U, but the following book was very helpful in comparing public university honors programs. She was accepted to both Pittsburgh and South Carolina honors colleges, both of which have good merit aid.

    A Review of Fifty Public University Honors Programs (2012.)

    Public University Honors | The site for public university honors colleges and programs
  • barronsbarrons Registered User Posts: 24,873 Senior Member
    what//////////////////////
  • pierre0913pierre0913 Registered User Posts: 7,652 Senior Member
    I go to Clemson University and in the southeast many top high school students in their class will just go to their in-state flagship university (which in South Carolina is kinda weird because there are two: Clemson and South Carolina - and then College of Charleston is the state liberal arts college. All are great schools).

    I am an engineering major and I have found that outside of your MIT/Cal Tech schools, most of the schools highly ranked in engineering are public schools (Georgia Tech/UC-Berkeley/Purdue).

    So don't discount flagship state universities. You're still getting a great education if that is what you're looking for.

    And mom2collegekids, you'll be surprised at how many people are from certain SC high schools (usually the one in Clemson, and some in the Columbia/Charleston/Greenville area) - one school in the Charleston area this year had 94 freshman going to Clemson....well their school has 3,000 students but that's still a lot.
  • NamelesStatisticNamelesStatistic Registered User Posts: 558 Member
    The OP isn't entirely wrong. The main goal of a state university is to educate the next generation of young people in that state. This is not always the same goal as Private universities. As a result most public universities are generally less selective on in state applicants than equally prestigious private schools, at least for undergraduate school. This is also because the reputation of the prestigious state universities is usually linked to their research generated by their graduate programs (ie. UMichigan, Berkeley, UCLA), and prestigious undergraduate focused institutions are rare like a counterpoint to a school like Dartmouth college (although one or two like William and Mary might be an exception). With the different overall objectives between public and private universities, and the reputation of the prestigious state flagships being built on graduate research rather than undergraduate education, I think it is true that public universities tend to be a little easier to get into then private universities with a similar reputation at the undergraduate level for in state students (this changes at the graduate level however).

    That is not to say that the top state schools are necessary easy to get into, even for in state students. There are plenty of private universities out there that would be easier to get into than public schools such as those listed above.
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