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Full Ride to a State School or Paying for an Ivy?

imsocool22imsocool22 7 replies29 postsRegistered User Junior Member
Which would you choose? A full ride to a state school or paying in full for an Ivy/top school? Why?
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Replies to: Full Ride to a State School or Paying for an Ivy?

  • JustOneDadJustOneDad 5726 replies119 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    If you have a very bright student, they will most likely benefit from going to the Ivy with other exceptionally bright students. A moderate student, however, just doesn't get that much benefit and will be better off with the full ride and a pocket full of cash on completion.
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  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids 83959 replies1009 postsForum Champion Financial Aid, Forum Champion Alabama Forum Champion
    What are the two schools?

    Would you get much/any aid from the ivy? If so, how much?

    What are your parents saying?

    What is your career goal?

    How much debt would you have to take on?

    How much debt would your parents have to take on?
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  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan 12668 replies29 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Indeed, what are your goals? Plus, Cal and Podunk U are very different. So are the various Ivies by various characteristics. Too many variables without specifics.

    @JustOneDad, actually, I disagree. An elite school benefits most either those kids from a disadvantaged background who otherwise would not be introduced to that culture or smart but lazy kids who know how to network.
    A very bright kid who's also driven and hard working will succeed anywhere.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 77133 replies672 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited February 2015
    The comparison of unnamed schools with no other information makes no sense.

    Are you talking about Harvard with an affordable-to-the-student net price of $10,000 after financial aid versus a full ride at Fort Hayes State for someone whose goal is management consulting?

    Or are you talking about Dartmouth at list price versus a full ride at Berkeley (Drake scholarship) for someone majoring in mechanical engineering, or a full ride to Texas for computer science?
    edited February 2015
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  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids 83959 replies1009 postsForum Champion Financial Aid, Forum Champion Alabama Forum Champion
    In another thread you mention being premed. If so, AND if going to an ivy means taking on debt, then "no"....don't do that....not a good idea unless the debt is quite small and the other school is - well - crappy

    Since you're a National merit, I'm guessing that the full ride is for that at some school ? Which school?

    But...you've also mentioned being deferred from H. If you're accepted and your family's income qualifies you for a nice bunch of aid, and your family will happily pay the rest, then go go go.

    We need more info....Can you answer the questions that I posted upthread?
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  • Mom2aphysicsgeekMom2aphysicsgeek 4478 replies56 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Are there any special programs at the scholarship school which will enhance your experience there? For example, NCSU's Park Scholarship offers a lot more than just $$. It offers mentoring, leadership roles, research opportunities, etc. Our ds is attending school on full scholarship and decided on his school bc of a special honors research program. His school also allows undergrads to take grad level classes. Students who have graduated from his program attend top grad schools.

    I come from the perspective of where you go to school is not as important as what you accomplish while you are there. BUT, all the schools my kids have attended are well respected locally, even if they are not revered nationally. Since you have not provided any information at all, you have to determine that yourself. If the regional area does not respect the school or companies are not actively recruiting its grads or none are attending top grad schools, etc, I would not want my kids to attend there. I would also say that if that is the case, were you accepted someplace affordable that is a happy medium?

    If they are well respected, however, you shouldn't dismiss the scholarship opportunity lightly.
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  • Mom2aphysicsgeekMom2aphysicsgeek 4478 replies56 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited February 2015
    For some reason I can't get the edit button to work.

    I wanted to add that at the bare minimum you should investigate what unique opportunities might be offered at the scholarship school to the recipients. If they offer special mentoring programs, I would call and find out more exact details and discuss the real outcomes of recent grads.
    edited February 2015
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  • 313phant313phant 7 replies3 postsRegistered User New Member
    It depends on your plans for after undergraduate graduation. If you're going to graduate school or professional school then it isn't worth paying for an Ivy when knowing it'll just pile on 200K worth of additional student debt. This was mentioned above, but the prestige is expensive and you have to decide if you prioritize that. You can get a great education at state schools, don't sell them short.
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  • JustOneDadJustOneDad 5726 replies119 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited February 2015
    A very bright kid who's also driven and hard working will succeed anywhere.
    Exactly, and going to the school with the brighter students will be that much more rewarding.

    ETA: I read this thread to be about paying for an Ivy and disadvantaged kids are likely not in the "paying" crowd.
    edited February 2015
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  • Mom2aphysicsgeekMom2aphysicsgeek 4478 replies56 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    JustOneDad wrote:
    PurpleTitan wrote:
    A very bright kid who's also driven and hard working will succeed anywhere.

    Exactly, and going to the school with the brighter students will be that much more rewarding.

    ETA: I read this thread to be about paying for an Ivy and disadvantaged kids are likely not in the "paying" crowd.

    There is a long populated stretch of kids who can't afford to pay their EFC at top schools.

    Fwiw, I do not believe that "brighter students" are only found at Ivies and that other schools are only populated with students below top students' abilities. I believe that bc my kids go to lower ranked schools bc we can't afford our EFC and they have all found academic peers and have thrived. And yes, I will go out on the limb and proclaim my kids as amg the "bright." ;)
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  • JustOneDadJustOneDad 5726 replies119 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @Mom2aphysicsgeek You'd have to show me where I said that bright kids are only found at Ivies. And, similarly, you'd have to point out where I said that "other" schools are only populated with students below top students abilities.
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  • Mom2aphysicsgeekMom2aphysicsgeek 4478 replies56 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited February 2015
    If you have a very bright student, they will most likely benefit from going to the Ivy with other exceptionally bright students. A moderate student, however, just doesn't get that much benefit and will be better off with the full ride and a pocket full of cash on completion.
    and
    and going to the school with the brighter students will be that much more rewarding.

    certainly imply that bright students can't find academic challenge at a full scholarship option.

    edited February 2015
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  • JustOneDadJustOneDad 5726 replies119 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Maybe you don't understand the English word "only".
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  • Mom2aphysicsgeekMom2aphysicsgeek 4478 replies56 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @JustOneDad‌
    8-|

    The implication is still the same. You imply that bright students are better served by the Ivy. I think that is a huge blanket statement especially when you don't know any details and only a generic question.
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  • JustOneDadJustOneDad 5726 replies119 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    The place honest discussion began to go awry was when you rephrased my statements completely restrictively to suit your purposes. We can go back and start there.

    There is no question that the Ivies have the highest concentration of the best and brightest. That is not to say that ALL students at other schools fall short in ALL ways. You will note that some institutions, particularly state flagship schools have taken to creating "Honors" tracks or colleges in order to provide a more similar environment for those students.
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  • Mom2aphysicsgeekMom2aphysicsgeek 4478 replies56 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    I don't think it went awry. Your statements speak for themselves. When you stated that an exceptionally bright student would most likely benefit from going to the Ivy with other exceptionally bright students but a moderate student doesn't get that much benefit and should tkae the scholarship, you most definitely implied that bright students are better served at the Ivy.

    Again, without knowing anything else about this situation, it is very difficult to know what best serves this student. Are there unique opportunities connected with the scholarship? Is paying for the Ivy a financial hardship for the family?

    And again, there is not a dearth of intellectuals on lower ranked campuses. Exceptionally bright students thrive in all sorts of places and can find their needs met with full scholarship schools. :) And they can even find themselves surrounded by other exceptionally bright students.
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  • txl146txl146 31 replies10 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    It all depends on the major. If I got into tier 1 public engineering school (UC Berkeley, UCLA, Michigan, Texas, Purdue, PSU, etc.) for a honors program w/ full scholarship, then I would definitely pick state school over ivy league school.

    However, I'd pick Harvard business school over any tier 1 public schools even with a full scholarship.
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