Welcome to College Confidential!

The leading college-bound community on the web

Sign Up For Free

Join for FREE, and start talking with other members, weighing in on community discussions, and more.

Also, by registering and logging in you'll see fewer ads and pesky welcome messages (like this one!)

As a CC member, you can:

  • Reply to threads, and start your own.
  • Post reviews of your campus visits.
  • Find hundreds of pages of informative articles.
  • Search from over 3 million scholarships.
Please take a moment to read our updated TOS, Privacy Policy, and Forum Rules.

Ratio of women to men in various liberal arts c's: does 60/40 ever become a problem?

HexagonalHexagonal Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
Hi, I've been looking at the ratio of women to men at various small liberal arts colleges my daughter is considering. Here are the gender ratios ranked from most equal to most skewed:

51% Women / 49% Men Bowdoin
53% Women / 47% Men Kenyon
53% Women / 47% Men Carleton
52% Women / 48% Men Sewanee
54% Women / 46% Men Grinnell
55% Women / 45% Men Wooster
57% Women / 43% Men Whitman
58% Women / 42% Men Hampshire
58% Women / 42% Men Kalamazoo

I don't see any inherent problem with a more unequal student body, but I was wondering if the *experience* of going to a school which is nearly 60/40 would ever be bad in an of itself? Would love to hear the thoughts of someone male or female at a college with a more unequal ratio. Does it ever effect the classroom dynamics? Does it ever happen that it's harder for the women to get decent dates because there are fewer men? Do the men have -- even marginally -- less incentive to behave more or less decently, since there are so many more women?

Any thoughts, esp. from students, would be really appreciated! Thanks~
«1

Replies to: Ratio of women to men in various liberal arts c's: does 60/40 ever become a problem?

  • albert69albert69 Registered User Posts: 3,247 Senior Member
    edited February 2015
    Well, that depends. If you are a guy going to a 60/40 female/male school who is looking for a significant other, than your chances are improved and viseversa. It also depends on the field you're in - engineering is pretty male dominated (for the most part) no matter what the overall split is.

    And the examples you gave aren't very drastic. I doubt 1% or 2% more females at the college will make much impact whatsoever.
  • IlliniDad18IlliniDad18 Registered User Posts: 98 Junior Member
    Story from NYT a few years ago about colleges with 60% (intelligent, successful) women.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/07/fashion/07campus.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0
  • kevinlee2016kevinlee2016 Registered User Posts: 7 New Member
    I never noticed that really.
  • siliconvalleymomsiliconvalleymom Registered User Posts: 4,461 Senior Member
    We found when we visited that even colleges with relatively even gender balance for the student body can have very lopsided classes for some subjects.
  • HexagonalHexagonal Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
    Well, it was interesting -- at one school we visited I asked the young woman student tour guide about it. I think it was Skidmore. She was really nice, and said it wasn't an issue for her -- she was on some team -- soccer, I think -- and spent most of her time with her teammates. Meaning that she was mostly in the company of women. She didn't see any problem, and I don't think that that had anything to do with her sexual orientation, just that it didn't come up for her. As a guy, I was thinking how if I were going to a school like this, my friends from high school would just be kidding me about how easy my 'chances' must be, but that my actual experience of the feminine-ness of the place might just be overwhelming at times...
  • HexagonalHexagonal Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
    IlliniDad18, that's a great article! Thanks for the link --
  • ZinheadZinhead Registered User Posts: 2,610 Senior Member
    @IlliniDad18 - Just because someone goes to college doesn't mean they are intelligent and successful. Most of the articles you see about college graduates swimming in debt are about women who chose a soft major that they cannot make a career in, and are stuck in hourly retail jobs. These women are not intelligent or successful.
  • HexagonalHexagonal Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
    okay, this is getting weird now. the risk of a public forum, I guess.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 63,569 Senior Member
    We found when we visited that even colleges with relatively even gender balance for the student body can have very lopsided classes for some subjects.

    Yes, there is likely to be a considerable difference in gender ratio between advanced physics and advanced psychology courses at coed schools with a wide range of majors.
  • gandalf78gandalf78 Registered User Posts: 1,273 Senior Member
    My concern with a lopsided ratio of female/male is that it will cause a distorted social dynamic between men and women; here is a link to an academic article on the subject: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3130599/

    I think that schools with lopsided female/male ratios that are located in larger towns or cities, or where there are other colleges and universities around, may not have those type of social distortions or to such a degree, because of the opportunities to meet other people; but for colleges that are located in smaller towns, or are more isolated, I would be more concerned about negative effects.
  • HexagonalHexagonal Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
    Thanks for the NIH link. Interesting. And -- exactly. As it turns out, the schools I listed in the original post are by no means atypical -- in fact, they're closer to equal than tons of schools! There seems to be two things going on -- more women enrolling than men, and more men dropping out than women. Both factors are in play, so you can't just look at matriculation to find out what the actual gender ratios are on a given campus --
  • HexagonalHexagonal Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
    edited February 2015
    Here's an older Forbes piece with some interesting info on the trend (published 2012, data from 2008): http://www.forbes.com/sites/ccap/2012/02/16/the-male-female-ratio-in-college/
  • HexagonalHexagonal Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
  • HexagonalHexagonal Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
«1
This discussion has been closed.