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Georgetown, Brown, Cornell Grade deflation?

SchoolResearch1SchoolResearch1 9 replies7 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 16 Junior Member
Hello! Please share about the above listed schools. Do they deflate grades? GPA will be super important as the plan is to go to medical school post undergrad. Intended major: Psychology with Pre-Med track. Thanks
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Replies to: Georgetown, Brown, Cornell Grade deflation?

  • bluebayoubluebayou 26529 replies172 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 26,701 Senior Member
    have you been accepted to any of them?

    if not, check back in the spring.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 76126 replies663 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 76,789 Senior Member
    http://www.gradeinflation.com/ (see list of schools at the bottom)
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  • Muad_dibMuad_dib 875 replies21 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 896 Member
    Because no one from Georgetown, Brown or Cornell goes to med school because their grades are lower an someone's from a lesser school.
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  • SchoolResearch1SchoolResearch1 9 replies7 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 16 Junior Member
    They do and many of them, however, it is becoming a known fact that grades are deflated significantly in the last several years, thus, creating bunch of questions to perspective students about the investment.
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  • SchoolResearch1SchoolResearch1 9 replies7 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 16 Junior Member
    Will be accepted to at least one of them if not all ;)
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  • bluebayoubluebayou 26529 replies172 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 26,701 Senior Member
    They do and many of them, however, it is becoming a known fact that grades are deflated significantly...

    Source, please?
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  • blossomblossom 9591 replies9 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 9,600 Senior Member
    The only school on this list which has grade deflation is Cornell and that's only in the engineering school and a couple of other programs- certainly not Psych in Arts and Sciences.

    You have been given bad "known facts".
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  • bclintonkbclintonk 7623 replies31 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 7,654 Senior Member
    I don't know about Cornell or Georgetown, but Brown is a poster child for grade inflation, with 53% of all grades being A, 22% B, and only 4% C. The rest are S (Satisfactory) at 18%, or NC (No Credit) at 3%. If you omit the S and NC categories which can't be used to calculate a GPA, that means 67% of all the grades that count toward GPA are A. These figures are for 2012-13, but I doubt they've changed much since then. (Brown doesn't calculate GPAs for its students, but employers and graduate/professional programs do).

    http://www.browndailyherald.com/2014/03/12/fighting-grade-inflation-cause-without-rebel/

    There are several reasons for this. First, Brown has an open curriculum, so a student who is weak in, say, math or foreign languages will never need to take a course in those subjects. Second, Brown doesn't use plus (+) or minus (-) grades, so every A- (3.67) performance becomes an A (4.0); and faculty say they're also under pressure to make a B+ (3.33) performance an A because the students, and the faculty themselves, feel it's unfair to lump the B+ performers together with the B- performers under the B grade---especially when other professors are distributing A grades so freely. Third, a D grade (1.0) just doesn't exist at Brown, so faculty must decide whether to give a student performing at a D level a grade of C (2.0) or F (0). But fourth, F grades are automatically expunged from the student's record, so students sometimes ask professors to give them an F rather than a C, because the F won't hurt their GPA. Fifth, students can take as many classes as they want on a S-NC basis, so conventional grading is essentially optional; and coupled with the open curriculum, this means Brown students can design the curriculum they want and get graded only in the courses they think they'll do well in. Sixth, students can withdraw from a course at any time up until the final exam period, so if a student finds she is not doing as well as expected in a course, POOF!, it disappears before it can hurt her GPA. This is all compounded by students' sense of entitlement. Like other top-tier schools, Brown enrolls very talented students who were all top performers in high school and expect to get the same grades in college. Some choose Brown in part for its reputation for easy grading. And when A's start flying around freely under Brown's lax grading policies, .it only intensifies student expectations and pressure on professors to dish out even more A's.

    The university's own website acknowledges that it is "difficult to compare a Brown student transcript with one from another school"---a polite way of acknowledge that grading at Brown is pretty much a joke. Faculty and administrators understand all this, and some worry that it debases the value of a grade of A, and thus diminishes the value of a high GPA from Brown. Graduate and professional schools at other universities, and some discerning employers, also recognize this. So easy grading might end up hurting some Brown grads---especially the truly stellar performers, because it becomes difficult to distinguish them from the students who would be B+/A- students at other schools. But so far, faculty and administrators at Brown haven't mustered up the nerve to take on these grading policies in any serious way. And the current policies probably do help some of the B+/A- students who can cruise through Brown with a near-perfect GPA and gain admission to graduate and professional programs that take numerical GPA at face value without considering context. Though some faculty and administrators also worry that these students may be deluding themselves into thinking they're more qualified than they are, and they may be in for a rude shock when they find themselves in an academic environment or a job situation where evaluative standards are more demanding.
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  • bluebayoubluebayou 26529 replies172 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 26,701 Senior Member
    edited August 2017
    ^^by definition, some school (of the ~3,000 four year colleges) has to have the highest mean GPA. Why not an Ivy League school? hahahaha
    The only school on this list which has grade deflation is Cornell and that's only in the engineering school..

    I would submit that challenging grading in Engineering in not deflation per se, but typical of every top engineering program.
    edited August 2017
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  • hs2015momhs2015mom 622 replies54 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 676 Member
    Cornell has grade deflation in the sciences as well, including some (many? most? not sure about that part) of the pre-med courses; they're curved to a B-
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  • Muad_dibMuad_dib 875 replies21 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 896 Member
    I'm suspicious of any pre-medical student shopping around for colleges that artificially inflate grades. But that's just me.
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  • SchoolResearch1SchoolResearch1 9 replies7 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 16 Junior Member
    See, the problem is not about deflation itself per se, it's kind of stressful knowing that the student studies continually and over studies for the class and tests, yet, they can barely pass certain professors classes. I do not see the need to suppress a very strong students GPA just because they have to weed out from a large group. There must be a fair grading system without purposely deflating. Also, it is a wrong assumption to make that one getting a B- , C in Chemistry or Biology would make a bad doctor. There are plenty of physicians that shouldn't be practicing because of other reasons though their undergrad GPA was superb from lower tier schools.
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