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good economics schools?

skylarscott1skylarscott1 0 replies1 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1 New Member
i'm looking for schools with strong economics programs in the northeast. i'd like a relatively small school with 5,000 enrollment at most. i'd think schools with 20% acceptance rate or higher would be good. thanks!!
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Replies to: good economics schools?

  • zaltsmanbenzaltsmanben 30 replies6 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 36 Junior Member
    You aren't really gonna get a school with all three criteria of size, acceptance, and northeast. Carnegie Mellon for example is strong and in the northeast but has a lower acceptance and higher enrollment. NYU is similar but has a very high enrollment even though the individual school is going to have a lower one.
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  • merc81merc81 9918 replies144 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 10,062 Senior Member
    edited November 2017
    You could find top-notch economics programs at schools such as Colgate and Hamilton that would meet all of your criteria:

    https://ideas.repec.org/top/top.uslacecon.html

    Brandeis could be another option.
    edited November 2017
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  • CrewDadCrewDad 1697 replies24 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1,721 Senior Member
    @Skylerscott
    I wouldn't give too much credibility to the ideas.repec ranking.
    The data presented here is experimental. It is based on a limited sample of the research output in Economics and Finance.
    This list is by no means based on a complete sample.
    https://ideas.repec.org/top/top.uslacecon.html
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  • gardenstategalgardenstategal 5345 replies10 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 5,355 Senior Member
    Most schools have decent economics programs for undergrads, and most have a similar set of core requirements. The requirements for a major may differ though. Some involve more math, some have a thesis and research, some allow practical finance classes to count toward the major while others do not, and some make it easier to study abroad. You may want to look at course catalogs and the requirements for a major at several schools that meet your other criteria to get a feel for the options.
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  • tk21769tk21769 10587 replies27 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 10,614 Senior Member
    You aren't really gonna get a school with all three criteria of size, acceptance, and northeast.

    This may be true (or nearly so) if you're only looking at research universities.
    As for liberal arts colleges, the northeast has many of them; virtually all have < 5K students; most have admission rates >= 20%.

    All the LACs listed in the ideas.repec ranking's top 25 also place well in some overall rankings. Some schools in the ideas.repec bottom half are less selective or less prestigious. Has ideas.repec exposed true "hidden gems" among these schools? That would depend on how well its criteria (like author citation counts) really reflect econ department quality. All the ideas.repec top 25, but not all the bottom 25, are rich selective schools that offer good to excellent need-based aid (which for many students is more important than the number of frequently-cited papers its faculty publish). It might be interesting to look at a different metric (like alumni econ PhD production) to see how many of the same schools show up in the top ~50.
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  • rickle1rickle1 1682 replies14 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1,696 Senior Member
    How about a business focused approach to economics (integrated in to a business curriculum)? If that appeals to you check out Bentley in the Boston area. 4k students, strong program.
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  • ChembiodadChembiodad 2414 replies21 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,435 Senior Member
    @skylarscott1, regarding posting #2, as the ideas.repec states, “There are 7522 institutions with 51326 registered authors evaluated for all the rankings.”, so while the data is experimental it came from a robust data set.

    As @tk21769 stated, the schools in the top half are well documented top rank schools so would be wonderful choices. There are many other ranking systems with fairly similar results; College Niche has one that may be useful for you.

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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 76129 replies663 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 76,792 Senior Member
    Most schools have decent economics programs for undergrads, and most have a similar set of core requirements. The requirements for a major may differ though. Some involve more math, some have a thesis and research, some allow practical finance classes to count toward the major while others do not, and some make it easier to study abroad. You may want to look at course catalogs and the requirements for a major at several schools that meet your other criteria to get a feel for the options.

    To expand on this, the typical economics major requires:

    * Introductory microeconomics.
    * Introductory macroeconomics.
    * Introductory statistics.
    * Intermediate microeconomics.
    * Intermediate macroeconomics.
    * Econometrics.
    * Additional economics electives.

    Where they may differ is:

    * Math required for the major and as prerequisites for the intermediate economics courses: no calculus versus single variable calculus versus multivariable calculus and/or linear algebra. At some schools, the introductory statistics course must be calculus-based. Pre-PhD students will find more math to be more favorable, and may take additional advanced math and statistics courses, such as real analysis and probability theory.
    * Senior thesis may be required at some schools.
    * Additional elective options can vary, such as mathematical economics, managerial ("business") economics, financial economics, economic history, behavioral economics, economics of trade, environmental economics, etc. Check catalogs and schedules for more information.
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  • gardenstategalgardenstategal 5345 replies10 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 5,355 Senior Member
    edited November 2017
    Thanks @ucbalumnus. Exactly what I meant. These kinds of differences can be quite meaningful. Especially to someone who doesn't excel at math!

    :)>-
    edited November 2017
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  • ChembiodadChembiodad 2414 replies21 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,435 Senior Member
    As @ucbalumnus pointed out many Economic programs strongly recommend/make it clear that additional math, beyond entry level Calc, will be required for those that intend to pursue a PhD - here's what Hamilton College states -

    "Students planning graduate work in economics should consult a member of the department for specific advice. They should take 400, selections from the other 400-level courses, 560 and obtain as strong a background in mathematics as possible. The sequence in calculus and linear algebra is required by virtually all good Ph.D. programs in economics; additional work in mathematics, such as courses in differential equations and real analysis, is strongly recommended. Students who plan to study for an M.B.A. should complete at least one semester of calculus and should consult “Information for Prospective M.B.A. Students,” a document available at the Career Center Web site, for additional recommendations."

    In addition like many similar highly selective LAC's, Hamilton College require a Senior project or thesis. Attached is the link to the Senior Program at Hamilton College https://www.hamilton.edu/academics/departments/Senior-Program?dept=Economics
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  • ChembiodadChembiodad 2414 replies21 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,435 Senior Member
    edited November 2017
    @tk21769, not certain that alumni econ PhD production is that meaningful as I think most would take an LAC Economics undergraduate degree directly into their first career given its viewed no differently than a business degree. In the case of investment banking and consulting firms, an LAC economics degree with a math minor that includes upper level math, including courses in differential equations and real analysis, could be considered a preferred path.
    edited November 2017
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  • CrewDadCrewDad 1697 replies24 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1,721 Senior Member
    edited November 2017
    It might be interesting to look at a different metric (like alumni econ PhD production

    Relying on data supplied by the National Science Foundation, the following schools produced the highest percentage of students who went on to earn a PhD in economics.

    Swarthmore
    Williams
    Reed
    Macalester
    Carleton
    Amherst
    Grinnell
    Wellesley
    Pomona
    Wesleyan
    Caltech
    Centre
    Princeton
    Whitman
    Davidson
    Knox
    Haverford
    Ohio Wesleyan
    MIT
    Kalamazoo

    Source: College Transitions
    edited November 2017
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  • ChembiodadChembiodad 2414 replies21 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,435 Senior Member
    In addition, College Transitions, using student-level data provided by Linkedin, was able to identify the colleges and universities sending the highest percentage of graduates to a top-ranked business school. The results are in alphabetical order:

    Amherst
    Bates
    Claremont-McKenna
    Columbia
    Cornell
    Dartmouth
    Duke
    Georgetown
    Hamilton
    Harvard
    Middlebury
    Northwestern
    Pomona
    Stanford
    Chicago
    Michigan
    Penn
    USC
    Yale
    Yeshiva

    Does Selectivity Matter? According to College Transitions, nearly 70% of MBA students in their sample received a degree from a college defined as Most Selective or Extremely Selective. However, a significant percentage (23%) also graduated from Moderately or Minimally Selective institutions where admission rates are 60% or higher.

    Source: College Transitions
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  • ChembiodadChembiodad 2414 replies21 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,435 Senior Member
    edited November 2017
    @skylarscott1,

    Here's College Transition list of EXTREMELY SELECTIVE colleges - those that accept fewer than 40% of all applicants AND possess an average composite ACT (25%tile) score of at least 28 OR an average combined SAT (25%tile) score (CR + M) of at least 1260. While many only accept 25% of all applicants AND possess an avg. composite ACT (25%tile) of 30 or higher, there are others that may be a good fit - all great schools.

    Barnard College
    Bates College
    Boston College
    Brandeis University
    Bucknell University
    Carleton College
    Carnegie Mellon University
    Colby College
    Colgate University
    College of William and Mary
    College of the Holy Cross
    Connecticut College
    Cooper Union
    Davidson College
    Emory University
    Franklin and Marshall College
    Georgia Institute of Technology
    Grinnell College
    Hamilton College
    Haverford College
    Kenyon College
    Lehigh University
    Macalester College
    New York University
    Northeastern University
    Oberlin College
    Scripps College
    Tulane University
    United States Military Academy
    United States Naval Academy
    University of California, Berkeley
    University of California, Los Angeles
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    University of Notre Dame
    University of Richmond
    University of Rochester
    University of Southern California
    University of Virginia
    Vassar College
    Wake Forest University
    Wellesley College
    Wesleyan University

    Source: College Transitions
    edited November 2017
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  • ChembiodadChembiodad 2414 replies21 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,435 Senior Member
    edited November 2017
    @CrewDad, a below 20% acceptance wasn't the OP's focus, so I saved the effort.

    :-c
    edited November 2017
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