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Cornell vs Johns Hopkins vs Emory vs NYU

JHUVSCORNELLJHUVSCORNELL Registered User Posts: 7 New Member
I got into Cornell Engineering, Johns Hopkins Public Health and Economics, Emory Public Health, and NYU Biostatistics.

Would you rank these schools in prestige/connections/job outlook?

Which of these programs would help me become most successful?

I am thinking:
1. Cornell
2. Johns Hopkins
3. NYU
4. Emory


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Replies to: Cornell vs Johns Hopkins vs Emory vs NYU

  • VANDEMORY1342VANDEMORY1342 Registered User Posts: 836 Member
    1. Johns Hopkins
    2. Cornell
    3. Emory
    4. NYU
    I'm assuming this is graduate school, and NYU is not Stern.
    Employment opportunities for these institutions will be great.
  • JHUVSCORNELLJHUVSCORNELL Registered User Posts: 7 New Member
    Thanks Vandemory1342
    Yes, I am talking about graduate programs.
    Would you put JHU's public health program over Cornell's Engineering?
  • bluebayoubluebayou Registered User Posts: 24,468 Senior Member
    for most employability (generic):

    1.
    3.
    2.
    4.

    For a general job in PH,

    2.
    3.
    4.
    1. (assumes not Environmental Engineering)

    For a quant job in PH

    3.
    2.
    4.
    1.
  • juilletjuillet Super Moderator Posts: 11,771 Super Moderator
    Yeah, this list doesn't make sense without the context. If you wanted to be a biostatistician, I would say that Cornell engineering is your worst choice. If you want to be an engineer, the only choice that makes sense is Cornell.

    So what do you want to do? Success is relative - it's in how you define it and what your career goals are.

    Emory's SPH is actually better than NYU's.
  • TooOld4SchoolTooOld4School Registered User Posts: 2,990 Senior Member
    Masters or Ph.D.?
  • JHUVSCORNELLJHUVSCORNELL Registered User Posts: 7 New Member
    edited December 2017
    Sorry for lacking the context. I am a healthcare professional and I would like to advance my career in pharma/healthcare administration through studying analytics/quantitative program. Cornell's systems/industrial engineering seems to help graduate placement in pharma industry. Also, Johns Hopkins public health also places people in healthcare sector. I feel that since I am already in healthcare profession, I don't need another healthcare degree since it feels like a duplicate, which is what lead me to apply to engineering program to broaden my background.
  • bluebayoubluebayou Registered User Posts: 24,468 Senior Member
    I am a healthcare professional and I would like to advance my career in pharma/healthcare administration...

    Consider an MBA to 'broaden' your resume. In b-school, you could take a few extra quant electives if that is your interest.
  • JsteezJsteez Registered User Posts: 110 Junior Member
    Usually your graduate degree is meant to be more specific and technical than your undergrad that way you can advance your career by being in the smaller pool of candidates with more technical expertise. I wouldn't pursue an engineering degree just to "broaden my background." If you're passionate about systems engineering and want to work as an industrial engineer/systems analyst then go to Cornell; it's great for that. I agree with @bluebayou in going down the MBA route instead. An MBA amplifies your prior work experience with an analytical business background and can be leveraged to much better recruiting than jumping from healthcare to systems engineering back to healthcare. FWIW, I work @ a top pharma/biotech and when we recruit graduate levels applicants, we evaluate them on a very specific skill set that's related to the position and how they've demonstrated that through their research/projects. Disjoint between your previous work experience, your graduate degree, and the current job you're seeking will be a mess unless you're trying to career switch.

    If you still have time you should check out JHU's MHA program. I think it's much more catered to what you want, health administration, and it has much better placement/recruiting.

    JHU MHA outcomes-
    https://www.jhsph.edu/departments/health-policy-and-management/degree-programs/master-of-health-administration/student-achievement-rates.html

    Here are the career outcomes for both programs. SystemsEng is very techy and non-healthcare. MPH is healthcare focused and sort of academia-centric.

    Cornell Engineering outcomes-
    http://www.engineering.cornell.edu/resources/career_services/students/statistics/upload/Systems-Engineering-report-3.pdf

    JHU MPH outcomes-
    https://www.jhsph.edu/offices-and-services/career-services/for-students/career-resources/JHSPH Career Outcomes/JHSPH_Career_Outcomes_Survey_Master_of_Pubilc_Health.pdf
  • JHUVSCORNELLJHUVSCORNELL Registered User Posts: 7 New Member
    Thanks @Jsteez and @bluebayou
    I am on my last semester of my MBA program with a masters degree in Business Analytics at Kelley. However, I feel like I need an engineering degree or a quant degree at a prestigeous school in order to compete with other applicants. I feel that MPH in health administration is very close to what I am looking for, but cornell seems to have the IVY brand that would help me become a competitive applicant. I have a Bachelors and PharmD with 4 years of hospital experience and 2 years of startup business management experience, but I am having difficulty finding a position in a big pharma. Hundred-some applications and a several interviews didn't land me my dream job in pharma. I feel that if I have a prestigeous school in my resume, I would be competitive enough to able to compete with the other applicants.
    Thank you for the outcomes reports. It is really helpful.
  • JsteezJsteez Registered User Posts: 110 Junior Member
    edited December 2017
    Since you have a pharmD and an MBA, pursuing more school is a HUGE waste of time and money. Kelley is a prestigious business school and your pharmD experience should look extra competitive in the world of big pharma. Additionally, the ivy brand of a master's degree is not as big as you think, maybe if it was an MFin from Columbia or MIT or something like that, but it's not. Your applications are probably being overlooked since you're actually overqualified for analyst roles. If you want to make it up the ladder in big pharma business your best bet is to jump from healthcare consulting to business development in pharma. Go on glassdoor and vault and research good healthcare consulting groups and apply as an experienced hire. You'll be considered at an associate level at all groups and then can move to big pharma after a year or two of business strategy experience. The dream-job entry MBA positions are given mostly to the young MBA interns that did rotations with the company or rotations with a rival company. The experienced MBA roles are mostly given to the previous young MBAs (they move up) or are snatched from our rivals (also with previous experience).

    At this point you need to think of opportunity cost. Every year you're wasting in master's programs which IMO isn't going to help at all is a year lost of valuable work experience, salary, and money spent. Who knows, you might actually get that job you want in the next 6 months? But if you give up and start a master's you will not, and when you finish your Master's you may not get that position either, but you're in a worse position because all that time and money is gone. I probably applied to 300+ different positions and interviewed with 20+ groups in pharma and healthcare ibanking/consulting before actually getting one offer... That's the way things are now. I would recommend having someone go over your resume from the career office at Kelley and advise you with your situation. They'll be way more helpful than responses on CC. There's a reason why B-schools advertise their 6 month job placement rates, not everyone gets that job before graduation.
  • juilletjuillet Super Moderator Posts: 11,771 Super Moderator
    Wait, you already have a PharmD and an MBA and you want to go back for another degree?!

    Yeah, I agree with @Jsteez. Stop. The "Ivy" brand is not going to get you a job in and of itself; you already have great schools on your resume, and as Jsteez said prestige alone is not what gets you jobs. Your skill set and experiences get you jobs.

    Everything else Jsteez said is excellent advice...you need to broaden your approach to the job market instead of going back to get another degree.
  • JHUVSCORNELLJHUVSCORNELL Registered User Posts: 7 New Member
    Dear TooOld4School,

    Masters degrees
  • JHUVSCORNELLJHUVSCORNELL Registered User Posts: 7 New Member
    Dear TooOld4School,

    Masters degrees
  • JHUVSCORNELLJHUVSCORNELL Registered User Posts: 7 New Member
    edited December 2017
    Dear @Jsteez and @juillet
    Thanks for the advice, but I have already decided to join one of these programs. These programs are hybrid programs (some taken online and some taken on-campus) so I can have my full-time job while studying. There are some on-campus requirements, so I have to go to campus for some of these classes, but overall, I won't be wasting any of my time because I will be gaining a degree while working full time. If anything, I will be wasting my efforts/slack time and some money that I am willing to spend on furthering my education/personal brand.
    I narrowed my decision to between Cornell School of Engineering and Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, but I can't decide which school would benefit my career better in healthcare/Big Pharma administration/management in terms of branding my resume or finding connections/networking. JHSPH's program seems much tougher than Cornell's, but there are many Medical Doctors in JHSPH program which can be a good networking for me. However, my MPH would lose its brand since there are so many MD's with MPH degrees. I was thinking that Engineering degree would be unique for a PharmD and give an edge as a quantitative professional. Also, I was thinking Ivy brand would be unique for a PharmD, because none of the IVY league schools offer a PharmD degree, so there are not many PharmD's with Ivy degree.
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