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Most overlooked factors in college choice

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Replies to: Most overlooked factors in college choice

  • billcshobillcsho 18314 replies91 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 18,405 Senior Member
    edited February 2018
    Student return rate .
    Merit scholarship renewal requirement.
    AP credit policy.
    Diffferent tuition rate for different major/program.
    edited February 2018
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  • lr4550lr4550 952 replies9 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 961 Member
    Academic calendar system- Semester? Trimester? Quarter? Block? Modified Block? It matters because the system determines when the academic year starts and ends, how many classes a student takes (simultaneously), and how long the classes take to complete for credit.
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  • merc81merc81 9915 replies144 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 10,059 Senior Member
    edited February 2018
    ^^^^ How can a college force a mid-year matriculation?
    edited February 2018
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  • bopperbopper 13872 replies98 discussionsForum Champion CWRU Posts: 13,970 Forum Champion
    Do most students stay on campus on the weekends?

    I know a student to went to essentially a college where students went home on the weekends...it was out of state for her, but she was unaware of that student behavior.

    Is the typical class 4 credit or 3 credits?
    My DD's went to state schools where the typical class was a 4 credit class so they took 4 classes/semester.
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  • Jugulator20Jugulator20 1516 replies18 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1,534 Senior Member
    @lr4550 I think it’s less about when classes start/end, how many classes, how long to gain credit, and more about students failing to realize how fast a say quarter v semester system is and how critical it can be to be ready on day 1, and how easy it is to be behind very quickly.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 76122 replies663 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 76,785 Senior Member
    edited February 2018
    merc81 wrote:
    How can a college force a mid-year matriculation?

    Frosh applicants generally apply to start in the fall semester. Some colleges offer a small number frosh applicants admission to start in the spring semester, which could have one or more of these purposes:

    A. Enrollment balancing between fall and spring semesters. If everyone starts in the fall semester, the fall semester tends to have higher enrollment than the spring semester, because students who graduate a semester early or late tend to have an extra fall semester. Starting some new frosh in the spring helps balance the enrollment, which may be important to colleges (often public ones) that are trying to enroll to full capacity without either overflowing (in the fall) or having unused/wasted capacity (in the spring).

    B. Moves a few of the new frosh with the weakest high school credentials out of the fall semester start that is captured for the purposes of common college rankings.

    Sometimes, a spring admission comes with an offer of an extension program in the fall (limited frosh-level course offerings, though students can live on campus with other frosh), or a study-abroad program in the fall, although students also have the option of taking a gap semester or sometimes attending a community college in the fall (details vary by college; in some cases, these other options for the fall may be less expensive than a regular semester while allowing earning a semester of credit). However, most frosh consider spring admission less desirable than regular fall admission.

    Since relatively few are given spring admission (as opposed to regular fall admission or rejection), this type of thing mainly becomes a consideration if an applicant actually gets a spring admission to one of his/her colleges.
    edited February 2018
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  • CheeringsectionCheeringsection 2335 replies70 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,405 Senior Member
    And I will add, spring matriculation will generally mean far less adjusting to campus support (social events, how to x info sharing, etc) so the frosh may have a more difficult time. The excitement of getting into that school might make this seem minor, but the student should consider it.
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  • lr4550lr4550 952 replies9 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 961 Member
    @Jugulator20 I agree, and that was sort of my round about way of trying to point out how important it is to look at the academic calendar since each system will have a different pace.
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  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan 12656 replies29 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 12,685 Senior Member
    @Cheeringsection: Eh. On the other hand, the spring admits have a ready-made cohort to bond with (the other spring admits).
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  • ChembiodadChembiodad 2414 replies21 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,435 Senior Member
    edited February 2018
    How about only offering a Waitlisted Student a Deferred Admission for the following year, so Fall 2019 instead of Fall 2018, which is what occurred at Chicago, Harvard and many other highly selective universities this past year.

    Or, only offering a Junior Year Guaranteed Transfer like Cornell has been doing for years.

    All of these are yield management tools that work and will likely be more prevalent across all highly selective schools as acceptance rates get further compressed.
    edited February 2018
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  • monydadmonydad 7786 replies158 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 7,944 Senior Member
    edited February 2018
    re #26: "Or, only offering a Junior Year Guaranteed Transfer like Cornell has been doing for years." ????

    I've not paid attention recently, but if the period is "for years", Cornell's colleges have routinely admitted students off of their waitlists, when warranted, in the conventional fashion, without deferral.

    In addition, (not "only"") some of the university's colleges have issued "guaranteed transfers" to some applicants, offering the prospect of deferred admission subject to meeting certain course and GPA standards elsewhere. As far as I'm aware, such admission was into sophomore year, not junior year. And "for years", the vast majority of these guaranteed transfers were issued predominantly by its state-affiliated colleges (ag school, ILR, Hum Ec). The endowed colleges (eg Arts & Sciences) were not highly represented in this. If the endowed colleges are getting in on the act now in a more material fashion, that is relatively recent, not "for years".

    Cornell's state-affiliated colleges have articulation agreements with community colleges, and those students are admitted into junior year. eg, https://admissions.cals.cornell.edu/apply/transfer/transfer-agreements
    Perhaps that's where the confusion lies..


    FWIW there is more than "yield management" behind the use of guaranteed transfers by the state-affiliated colleges. The "general ed" courses are often taught in the endowed colleges, and that involves internal funds transfers out from the state-affiliated colleges. The guaranteed transfer students have already taken these courses elsewhere, so when they show up they will be taking more credits in-college, so less funds transferred out to CAS. Versus. other transfer applicants they might admit who may not have completed these particular courses.
    edited February 2018
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  • roycroftmomroycroftmom 2676 replies36 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,712 Senior Member
    One's peers. If attending a school with a high percentage of students who continue for graduate arts/sciences degrees, a student is more likely to pursue that option because it will be discussed often. Conversely, if most students head for business/Wall street, your student is more likely to as well.
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