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Net Neutrality just ended today

NASA2014NASA2014 Registered User Posts: 2,328 Senior Member
Anyone concern about this?
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Replies to: Net Neutrality just ended today

  • ChezCurieChezCurie Registered User Posts: 175 Junior Member
    No one really knows how this will change things, but I can't believe it will lead to anything good.
  • bluebayoubluebayou Registered User Posts: 25,472 Senior Member
    as someone who streams/games very little, no concerns whatsoever.
  • sciencenerdsciencenerd Registered User Posts: 1,730 Senior Member
    ^Even if one doesn't game or stream right now I would still be concerned to see the full repercussions of the change.
  • romanigypsyeyesromanigypsyeyes Registered User Posts: 33,723 Senior Member
    It's not just streaming and gaming that you should be concerned about.

    Yes, I'm quite worried. I've dealt with internet companies long enough to not want to give them more power and control than they already had.

    Plus, we already know that sites have been blocked by certain providers for political reasons. The courts have pushed back at them. They just lost some of their push back power.
  • emilybeeemilybee Registered User Posts: 12,924 Senior Member
    IMO, it will hurt small businesses the most who won’t be able to compete with the “big boys” whose sites will load faster, because they will be able to afford to pay more for service. It’s also going to hurt individuals who don’t want to or cannot afford the faster “highway.”

    My Guv has signed an EO to require ISP’s operate under Net Neutrality in NYS and other states have begun to do the same or try to pass legislation. I believe Washington State has already passed legislation, but the Georgia’s legislature voted their bill down. So, it’s likely going to depend on what actions (or inaction) one’s state does how it will affect everyone.
  • bluebayoubluebayou Registered User Posts: 25,472 Senior Member
    Perhaps I'm naive, but rules that were in place for 20+ years worked out ok. But more importantly, with the incoming 5G, which is up to 50 times faster than 4g, many of y'all will be able to cut the cable cord.
    Even if one doesn't game or stream right now I would still be concerned to see the full repercussions of the change.
    It's not just streaming and gaming that you should be concerned about.

    Help me out here, what am I missing? (yeah, I understand Netflix and Amazon's concerns -- streaming -- but for just a regular folk like me?)
    IMO, it will hurt small businesses the most who won’t be able to compete with the “big boys” whose sites will load faster, because they will be able to afford to pay more for service.

    ok, that makes some sense, but to me, the Big Boys should pay more since they/their customers use more bandwidth.
  • emilybeeemilybee Registered User Posts: 12,924 Senior Member

    “ok, that makes some sense, but to me, the Big Boys should pay more since they/their customers use more bandwidth.”

    The big boys websites will load much faster for the customer than a small businesses will, unless they pay more (which will hurt their bottom line,) so customers will likely chose to purchase from sites that load faster. The end of net neutrality will hurt small businesses either by them having to spend more on internet service or losing customers to faster websites.
  • bluebayoubluebayou Registered User Posts: 25,472 Senior Member
    edited June 11
    With all due respect, emily, the Big Boys already load faster today under NN. Their volume is so large that their servers are directly connected to the ISP's.
    Because these companies are moving so much traffic on their own, they've been forced to make special arrangements with the country's internet service providers that can facilitate the delivery of their sites and applications. Basically, they're bypassing the internet backbone, plugging straight into the ISPs. Today, a typical webpage request can involve dozens of back-and-forth communications between the browser and the web server, and even though internet packets move at the speed of light, all of that chatter can noticeably slow things down. But by getting inside the ISPs, the big web companies can significantly cut back on the delay. Over the last six years, they've essentially rewired the internet.

    Google was the first. As it expanded its online operation to a network of private data centers across the globe, the web giant also set up routers inside many of the same data centers used by big-name ISPs so that traffic could move more directly from Google's data centers to web surfers. This type of direct connection is called "peering." Plus, the company set up servers inside many ISPs so that it could more quickly deliver popular YouTube videos, webpages, and images. This is called a "content delivery network," or CDN (see glossary, right).

    https://www.wired.com/2014/06/net-neutrality-missing/

  • greenwitchgreenwitch Registered User Posts: 8,245 Senior Member
    The "past 20 years" are filled with abuses by Verizon, Comcast and ATT in particular, before net neutrality laws were put into effect. Netflix was their most common focus of attack, but there were others. Ever hear of "throttling"? It's service that is slowed down at certain times of high demand or service by certain providers (usually netflix) that becomes spotty or slow. Funny, how Big Company's own netflix-wannabe channel won't slow down...hmmmm, maybe we should all switch to that?

    Net neutrality is basically against bullying. You can still pay more to your cable provider for faster service. You should get that faster service, and you should get it equally for all channels. That's what is ending today.
  • roethlisburgerroethlisburger Registered User Posts: 2,266 Senior Member
    greenwitch wrote:
    The "past 20 years" are filled with abuses by Verizon, Comcast and ATT in particular, before net neutrality laws were put into effect. Netflix was their most common focus of attack, but there were others. Ever hear of "throttling"? It's service that is slowed down at certain times of high demand or service by certain providers (usually netflix) that becomes spotty or slow. Funny, how Big Company's own netflix-wannabe channel won't slow down...hmmmm, maybe we should all switch to that?

    Net neutrality is basically against bullying. You can still pay more to your cable provider for faster service. You should get that faster service, and you should get it equally for all channels. That's what is ending today.

    This reflects a misunderstanding of what net neutrality was and did. Net neutrality never guaranteed you would get the same speed for all channels. It never prevented Netflix throttling. There seem to be a lot of myths about net neutrality from people who don't understand tech and ISP peering agreements.
  • JenJenJenJenJenJenJenJen Registered User Posts: 1,106 Senior Member
    What are those myths, @roethlisburger ?
  • roethlisburgerroethlisburger Registered User Posts: 2,266 Senior Member
    edited June 11
    @JenJenJenJen

    The largest myth is that under net neutrality a cable provider couldn't throttle the speed of major streaming services, ex. Netflix, at speeds slower than their own programming. They were completely free to do that under net neutrality, subject of course to any contractual arrangements with Netflix or other streaming services.
  • greenwitchgreenwitch Registered User Posts: 8,245 Senior Member
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bandwidth_throttling
    Net neutrality is the principle that all Internet traffic should be treated equally. It aims to guarantee a level playing field for all websites and Internet technologies. With net neutrality, the network's only job is to move data—not to choose which data to privilege with higher quality, that is faster, service. In the US, on February 26, 2015, the Federal Communication Commission adopted Open Internet rules. They designed to protect free expression and innovation on the Internet and promote investment in the nation's broadband networks. The Open Internet rules are grounded in the strongest possible legal foundation by relying on multiple sources of authority, including: Title II of the Communications Act and Section 706 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996. The new rules apply to both fixed and mobile broadband service.[6]

    Bright line rules:

    No blocking: broadband providers may not block access to legal content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices.
    No throttling: broadband providers may not impair or degrade lawful Internet traffic on the basis of content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices.
    No paid prioritization: broadband providers may not favor some lawful Internet traffic over other lawful traffic in exchange for consideration or payment of any kind—in other words, no "fast lanes." This rule also bans ISPs from prioritizing content and services of their own affiliated businesses.[7]
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