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Colleges looking for Asian diversity

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Replies to: Colleges looking for Asian diversity

  • TTGTTG 1662 replies14 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1,676 Senior Member
    I really like the list in #12. I know William and Mary is making a concerted effort to diversify and is having some success. Admissions is challenging for OOS females.

    I think the Catholic schools on the list are great suggestions as well. And I think Catholic schools in general would be a good bet, in terms of finding a school with equal academics but less challenging admissions. For example, academics at College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA are as strong as anywhere. I know they'd love to have a more diverse applicant pool. Many non-Catholics attend Catholics schools (and teach at them).

    I'd also say, in general, midwestern schools. Take the University of Kansas. State flagship with many of the top students in the state attending. Lawrence is a great college town, with lots of different kinds of restaurants in a fun downtown student area, and some developing tech. Students can also get a fantastic education at some of the other midwestern flagships and land-grant schools--Kansas State (also great college town, I hear), Nebraska and Iowa (urban schools!), Iowa State, and Michigan State. All of these are major research universities. Also, I think some of the midwestern LACs would be good bets--thinking of Kalamazoo College (hidden gem), Denison, College of Wooster, Kenyon, Creighton (Catholic) and urban), and Miami of Ohio (larger university).

    Also, I feel pretty confident that lots of the "Colleges That Change Lives" would really love to have more diverse applicant pools.

    https://ctcl.org

    Good luck, you can do great!
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 76569 replies665 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 77,234 Senior Member
    edited June 2018
    Re: #22

    Bethlehem was a steel town, right?

    I do know someone who lives in the area who mentioned a lot of alt-right (i.e. white nationalist / racist) sentiment in the area.

    Also, while Philadelphia and NYC are more left leaning, they may be less so on race, with relatively high levels of racial segregation.
    edited June 2018
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  • aquaptaquapt 1948 replies37 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1,985 Senior Member
    You can look to the Pacific Northwest as well. Whitman College, an excellent LAC in Eastern Washington, has only 4% Asian students. Lewis and Clark, in Portland, is at 5% too; and Reed, also in Portland, is at 9%.
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  • CorbettCorbett 3434 replies4 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 3,438 Senior Member
    edited June 2018
    Also, while Philadelphia and NYC are more left leaning, they may be less so on race, with relatively high levels of racial segregation.
    Do the many Asian-Americans who choose to enroll at schools in Philadelphia and NYC -- e.g. NYU (20% Asian-American), Penn (19%), Cooper Union (19%), Curtis Institute (18%), or Columbia (18%) -- actually find racial segregation to be a significant concern?
    Bethlehem was a steel town, right? .. I do know someone who lives in the area who mentioned a lot of alt-right (i.e. white nationalist / racist) sentiment in the area.
    Do the many Jews who choose to enroll at schools in the Lehigh Valley -- e.g. Muhlenberg (#16 on Hillel's "Schools Jews Choose" percentage ranking, at an estimated 25% of undergraduate enrollment), Lehigh (#28, at an estimated 16%), or Lafayette (unranked, but at an estimated 10%) -- actually find white nationalism to be a significant concern?
    edited June 2018
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  • JeanJeanieJeanJeanie 124 replies16 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 140 Junior Member
    edited June 2018
    Wow, super interesting thread, thanks! Didn't know Lehigh was actively recruiting in the Bay Area.

    My son is half Asian, half white. Not sure that's a good thing or a deal breaker, diversity wise! Ha. :)
    edited June 2018
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  • calitoeastcalitoeast 76 replies9 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 85 Junior Member
    @Corbett my brother ((Indian) Asian American) goes to penn (which is making me even more stressed about colleges haha) and he says there are a lot of whites but for the most part there isn’t super out right racial segregation (but there are always “those” groups too)
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  • prezbuckyprezbucky 4320 replies11 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 4,331 Senior Member
    Midwestern and southern LACs and probably most schools (U and LAC) in the plains and mountain states.
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  • calitoeastcalitoeast 76 replies9 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 85 Junior Member
    @TTG @aquapt wow thank you both so much for your thorough responses and options!! I will definitely look into everything you guys mentioned!
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  • gardenstategalgardenstategal 5392 replies10 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 5,402 Senior Member
    Yes to schools in Maine and Pennsylvania. I know Asian kids who got diversity weekend invitations and are now happily attending these schools. I think Ohio, Minnesota, Iowa, etc. might be the same. To be solicited for diversity, you have to be willing to be in the minority. I know that sounds obvious, but it's how you go from ORM to URM. Great options imho... Good for you for entertaining this!
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  • shawnspencershawnspencer 3098 replies12 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 3,110 Senior Member
    It may also depend what type of Asian-American you are. Chinese-Americans, Indian-Americans, Korean-American and the like are often well represented at many schools, but if you are considered a Pacific Islander or one of the underrepresented Asian-Americans (such as Cambodian-American, Hmog-American, etc)

    Also something you may want to consider is whether you really want to go to go to a school where Asian-Americans are in the definite minority. There are schools where they make up 2% or less of the population, but it may affect your own experience in terms of finding people from the same background, cultural groups that have a significant presence on campus, or otherwise finding people to relate to. While for many students it wasn't something they considered before college, many students who ended up joining those cultural organizations and the like have found it helpful in making it seem more like a "home."
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  • calitoeastcalitoeast 76 replies9 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 85 Junior Member
    @gardenstategal @shawnspencer oh yeah that's an interesting point I hadn't thought of! I guess it could be a nice change as my high school and sf bay area, in general, is so heavily Asian (nothing wrong w it but I really hope my college experience is not like high school)
    That's still a really good point that I will definitely have to factor in though as it might be hard to mesh with people too different from me.

    Thank you so much!
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  • momprof9904momprof9904 327 replies2 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 329 Member
    @calitoeast Did you post your stats anywhere? And what types of things interest you? It may help so that we can give more specific comments.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 76569 replies665 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 77,234 Senior Member
    TiggerDad wrote:
    The first thing he wants to do when he starts school this fall is to join its Korean Student Association and start taking Korean language classes (he speaks Korean barely).

    Heritage speaker Korean language courses available at his college?
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  • TiggerDadTiggerDad 1819 replies70 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1,889 Senior Member
    @ucbalumnus

    Yes, and the club, and I believe a Study Abroad opportunity....
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  • CorbettCorbett 3434 replies4 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 3,438 Senior Member
    edited June 2018
    Also something you may want to consider is whether you really want to go to go to a school where Asian-Americans are in the definite minority. There are schools where they make up 2% or less of the population, but it may affect your own experience in terms of finding people from the same background, cultural groups that have a significant presence on campus, or otherwise finding people to relate to.
    Note also that "percentage" isn't the whole story; the absolute numbers matter as well. A hypothetical large state university in the Midwest or South, for example, might have only 6% Asian-American enrollment, but if they have around 35,000 undergraduates, that would mean around 2,100 Asian-Americans in absolute terms. That's still a relatively large number -- in fact, it is more than the total enrollment of many LACs -- so it might well be sufficient "critical mass" to sustain a significant number of Asian-oriented classes, cultural groups, etc.

    In contrast, a hypothetical LAC might have only 2,000 undergraduates total, so 6% Asian-American enrollment (the same percentage) might mean only 120 others on campus, or maybe 30 per class. That's obviously a much smaller number in absolute terms, and it might or might not be sufficient to start and successfully sustain Asian-oriented classes or clubs.
    edited June 2018
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