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Dual Enrollment Credit and Schools outside Colorado

RainbowSkysRainbowSkys 14 replies5 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
Hello,
I am a high school senior at an early college high school where I earn concurrent/dual enrollment credit. Basically, I take my courses at the community college and get college credit for them (over 70 credits so far).

They are guaranteed to transfer to any public school in Colorado, but sadly my first choice school (not in CO) doesn't accept DE credit. It took about 3 ish universities off my list, so I'm looking for other school with a high caliper of academic rigor, but will also accept DE credit. Just to get an idea of my stats:

- 1440 SAT, 3.95 UW GPA, 4.72 W GPA. Medium-High amount of ec's

My other main factors are that I'm trying to keep the cost at or under 30,000 per year (not sticker price) so I'm looking for places that have generous merit aid. I also would prefer not go to somewhere hot/in the south.

I know this is a lot to ask, just seeing if anyone knows of any universities that would fit this description. Thanks>
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Replies to: Dual Enrollment Credit and Schools outside Colorado

  • SybyllaSybylla 3817 replies48 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    This is a school by school thing.
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  • airway1airway1 726 replies3 threadsRegistered User Member
    some universities should have a credit tool that helps with acceptance. We had the same issue as Penn state accepted only 3 credits. This is when IB and AP are better if you can get the scores
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  • momofsenior1momofsenior1 7266 replies56 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Our experience with DE was that D didn't find out until a few weeks before course registration if they were going to be accepted or not. The websites were vague and just said they "may be" accepted. As noted, there was more transparency for AP/IB scores.

    Is there a guidance counselor you can speak to and see where other students were successful transferring credits?
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  • RainbowSkysRainbowSkys 14 replies5 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    I was at a college fair last night where two schools told me they just straight up didn’t accept credits. Sadly my school doesn’t offer AP or IB. I find that some schools say that they will take them under some circumstances- usually be case basis but they need to be done outside of the high school and not used to fulfill high school requirements. Some public schools have more lenient rules, but they’re still by case basis- so not guaranteed. Just wondering if anyone had any personal experience with specfic universities.
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  • racereerracereer 176 replies1 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    What are you considering for your major? You will have more luck with public schools it seems. I know you said you didn't want hot or south, but as an example S19 went OOS to Ga Tech and was able to transfer in over 50 credits many of which were dual enrolled at a community college. They have a transfer equivalency web page where you can look up the school you are transferring from and their classes to see what the GT equivalent class is. If your school or class is not listed you can submit it for evaluation. I am sure other schools have similar tools and policies.
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  • thumper1thumper1 74793 replies3278 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    So...what’s wrong with the public colleges in Colorado that WILL accept your credits?
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  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone 22974 replies17 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    You need to understand how the credits will work if you stay at the same college, attend a Colorado school, or go OOS. A Colorado school may accept the credits but still require you to take 60+ credits on campus, or accept them all as general credits but which don't meet school or major requirements.

    You may not be losing any time by going to an OOS school. An OOS school may not give you 75 credits, but you'd have to take those same courses if you go to CSU or CU too, especially if the courses you are taking are lower level.
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  • thumper1thumper1 74793 replies3278 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Right...dual enrollment courses might not satisfy graduation requirements in your major even IF a college accepts the credits.

    My kid had one DE course...which she got an A in. Her college accepted that course...no problem. BUT it was a course required for her major and they require all major courses to be taken at their school...so she took it again. She just had that extra course credits kicking around. Same thing happened with her AP courses. School accepted them, but they didn’t apply towards any of her degree requirements.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 78232 replies690 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited September 22
    thumper1 wrote: »
    My kid had one DE course...which she got an A in. Her college accepted that course...no problem. BUT it was a course required for her major and they require all major courses to be taken at their school...so she took it again. She just had that extra course credits kicking around.

    She was not allowed to take a more advanced or in-major elective course in substitution? Also, the college did not delete the duplicate credit after she took it again?
    edited September 22
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  • thumper1thumper1 74793 replies3278 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    @ucbalumnus yes, she took a more advanced version of the same course in college. My point is...her DE course didn’t fulfill ANY requirements towards her college degree. None.

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  • momofsenior1momofsenior1 7266 replies56 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Depending on your intended major, your DE credits may not help you graduate any earlier anyway. My D is a chem e and started 1 course short (mostly from AP credits) of having "junior standing." Because of course sequencing for her major, she can't graduate any earlier than 8 semesters. It just helps her not have to take gen ed requirements and gives her priority scheduling/housing. She now has room for other things like a minor, concentrations, certifications, etc....
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  • RainbowSkysRainbowSkys 14 replies5 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    I think I have decided on (for outside CO):
    Ohio State
    University of Utah
    UNC Chapel hill
    UW Seattle
    University of Oregon

    Would these have any rules that would make me need to go for all 4 years? I'm aiming for 2-3 max
    Planning on majoring in Biomedical sciences, Biochem, or Biology at most schools depending on what they have
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  • thumper1thumper1 74793 replies3278 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited September 26
    I’m not understanding this at all. If you want to be guaranteed that a college will take your DE classes...stay in Colorado.

    Even with that, please keep in mind that you might not graduate a minute early because the school might accept your credits, but some might not apply to your degree requirements.

    That’s what you need to check...not only in CO, but everywhere else you plan to apply.

    Why do you want to graduate in 2-3 years? It can’t be cost or you wouldn’t be applying to OOS public universities.

    Have you run net price calculators for these OOS publics? I’m finding it hard to believe that your full costs per year will be $30,000 at these schools.
    edited September 26
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  • Twoin18Twoin18 1590 replies17 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited September 26
    I think Utah is the only one of these schools that might get you to $30K per year, either with WUE or perhaps with an academic achievement scholarship followed by residency (I don’t think you’ll get one of the full tuition scholarships without a 1500+ SAT score).

    Utah don’t guarantee that you’ll get credit, it’s a case by case evaluation. They do allow APs (and therefore presumably DE) to get you out of the lower level GE requirements, but you can’t get out of required Honors courses (do take Honors College if offered it, not least for the nicer housing) and you would have to see how your DE courses line up with your planned major requirements. My D had 50+ credits going in from her AP courses, but she’ll only use about 10-15 of them to substitute for GEs. Having said that, you very likely can finish in 3 years, especially if you stay for residency the first summer and take courses then. You wouldn’t finish in two years, sequencing of pre-requisites would almost certainly make it impossible.
    edited September 26
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  • SybyllaSybylla 3817 replies48 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    What is your career plan?
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  • RainbowSkysRainbowSkys 14 replies5 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    The main reason I want colleges to take my DE credit is because I don't want to waste time taking the same classes over again. I know Washington and UNC will likely be expensive, but I'm applying for some merit scholarships there and want to see what I get. I've heard that Ohio and Oregon have good merit scholarships too, and at Utah i'll get WUE.
    The thing is, I can't find any information about if they do accept my credits, what they will fulfill in my degree area. I hope to realistically get 3 years at anywhere I apply. Is there anyway to know how many/which credits the schools will take before I decide on where I want to go or do I have to get in touch with someone in admissions at each college specifically?

    Sybylla- I plan to get a masters to be a physician assistant
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  • AlwaysMovingAlwaysMoving 163 replies1 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    edited September 29
    It will be tough to be done in 3 years. Most schools have requirements that tie you to 4 years.

    Your best chance is Colorado universities that are required to take the dual enrollment credit. They still might put up road blocks.

    As for oos schools, I would contact them after acceptance and find out what credits will transfer. Don't go to the school until they tell you how many credits and how those credits can be used.

    You might be better off taking more classes at the community college and then transferring to a larger 4 year school.
    edited September 29
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  • thumper1thumper1 74793 replies3278 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Your issue is not how many of your credits the schools take. Your bigger and more important issue is how many will be able to satisfy core course or requirements in your major.

    Like I said, my kid’s courses were “accepted” but did not reduce what she had to take to satisfy her major requirements at her university.
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  • comomx3comomx3 3 replies0 threadsRegistered User New Member
    edited September 29
    My son, who graduated from a Colorado high school in 2018 had 43 credits (AP and DE from Front Range CC, Colorado Christian, and CU Boulder/Denver) transfer to Georgia Tech. I see you listed the schools you are interested in. GT is a great value for OOS if you haven't considered it.
    edited September 29
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  • AlwaysMovingAlwaysMoving 163 replies1 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    comomx3 wrote: »
    My son, who graduated from a Colorado high school in 2018 had 43 credits (AP and DE from Front Range CC, Colorado Christian, and CU Boulder/Denver) transfer to Georgia Tech. I see you listed the schools you are interested in. GT is a great value for OOS if you haven't considered it.

    Did GT let him graduate in 3 years?
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