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Yale/Hogwarts/Oxford/Cambridge Like Residential College System

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Replies to: Yale/Hogwarts/Oxford/Cambridge Like Residential College System

  • CupCakeMuffinsCupCakeMuffins Registered User Posts: 630 Member
    edited October 26
    LOL! In my mirror, i’m a genetic wonder but that doesn’t effect my genetic make up.

  • CU123CU123 Registered User Posts: 2,741 Senior Member
    Wow, "a small LAC", with 30000 of your classmates, just don't see it. You really need to actually attend a small LAC to understand what that is like.
  • TheGreyKingTheGreyKing Forum Champion Williams College Posts: 1,864 Forum Champion
    I think that @ChoatieMom’s point is that a residential college system at a large university can create a smaller, more intimate community... which is also part of what the OP is seeking.
  • YnotgoYnotgo Registered User Posts: 3,896 Senior Member
    edited October 27
    Caltech also has a House system. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_System_at_the_California_Institute_of_Technology

    Only one of the houses has faculty who live in the house, in case that feature of the Yale-style residential college is what you are looking for. Also, Caltech is a lot smaller than others that have been named.

    Only rarely are classes located in the Houses, and then they are available to all students.
  • CupCakeMuffinsCupCakeMuffins Registered User Posts: 630 Member
    edited October 27
    I’m looking for smaller schools where some faculty and all students live in same small residential college community for 4 years. It’s very different than what huge student bodies with half or more living off campus can ever experience. Yale, Rice and Caltech seems to be closest to Oxford/Hogwarts in US.
  • collegemom3717collegemom3717 Registered User Posts: 5,656 Senior Member
    In the US that's really a LAC. For example, Williams (which touts it's version of a 'tutorial system' is about 2000 students total. Most of the Colleges That Change Lives are smaller again.
  • CupCakeMuffinsCupCakeMuffins Registered User Posts: 630 Member
    edited October 27
    We are looking for a college with less than 5,000 undergrads, residential colleges mandatory and faculty living with students so they have a close knit community with easy access to professors and other resources. There should be year around internship opportunities nearby.

    LAC are fantastic for some but a small rural college town with less students than our high school, is not what he is looking for so Williams is not suitable for this kid.
  • ChoatieMomChoatieMom Registered User Posts: 4,784 Senior Member
    edited October 27
    CU123 wrote:
    Wow, "a small LAC", with 30000 of your classmates, just don't see it. You really need to actually attend a small LAC to understand what that is like.

    Our son attended a very LAC-like New England boarding school and is now at a college with 4,000 students (albeit not a traditional LAC). We lived in the Boston area for more than ten years. I have a pretty good idea. ;)

    The Res College at Michigan is 800 students housed in East Quad. Though I loved wandering around campus, I rarely needed to leave my beautiful, ivy-covered dorm.* I never set foot on North Campus or attended a football game and only had three classes with more than 30 students. By senior year, I was mostly in seminars with ten or fewer students. I had no idea how big the U really was. For good or bad, my Michigan education experience was small classes, easy access to my professors (many of whom I got to know quite well), and a tight community defined by the space between East Quad and the Diag. It felt very small and intimate to me. This was in the late 70s. Perhaps things have changed, but we were in Ann Arbor for DH's 40th reunion last month and the Res College was just where we left it.

    There's a nice video at the bottom of this page:

    https://lsa.umich.edu/rc/prospective-students/why-choose-the-rc-.html

    (It probably helped that DH lived on my hall. :) )
  • DustyfeathersDustyfeathers Registered User Posts: 3,083 Senior Member
    edited October 27
    Some LACs may fit most of your requirements. There are some urban LACs for example that have year-round internships. (Most US students do the internship part differently. They intern during summers or some college have breaks in January for internships -- Bennington. The colleges often offer help to the students in finding these internships and some of them provide funding for non-funded internships. Check individual colleges for their policies.)

    Vassar comes to mind. Poughkeepsie is a large enough city to offer year-round internships and the career office has listings (or it did at one time and probably still does). Also it's on the commuter train line to NYC and it's possible to go to the City for a day trip. It's a long commute for a single day but possible for shows and museums, etc. Vassar also had at least SOME faculty in the residence halls. They had apartments in some of the residence halls for some faculty. Not all faculty.

    Sarah Lawrence has the one-on-one experience with professors. It's 20 minutes from NYC on a train.

    Other urban LACs include--
    Trinity in Hartford
    Connecticut College in New London
    Bates in Lewiston, Maine
    Occidental in Los Angeles
    Mills in the San Francisco Bay Area
    Reed in Portland
    Lewis & Clark in Portland
    St. Olaf is 40 miles from Minneapolis but has buses
    Ithaca
    U of Rochester is a small uni but may have what you're looking for
    Wesleyan possibly is small enough and the town is large enough for your needs
    Rhodes in Memphis
    Centre in Lexington
    Earlham
    Barnard in NYC
    Near Philly and within 20 minutes of the city --
    Haverford
    Swarthmore
    Bryn Mawr -- actually looks like a Scottish castle BTW

    Simmons in Boston
    Boston College
    Wellesley -- near Boston

    LACs near or in lively small towns with year-round potential for work
    - Smith
    - Hampshire -- lots of one-on-one time iwth professors
    - Mt. Holyoke
    - Amherst
    If you attend any one of these four colleges, you can take classes at the others. Free buses take you around.

    Skidmore -- in Saratoga
  • collegemom3717collegemom3717 Registered User Posts: 5,656 Senior Member
    residential colleges mandatory....faculty living with students so they have a close knit community...year around internship opportunities nearby.

    Actually, I don't think that this exists. It certainly doesn't at Oxford/Cambridge/Durham (undergrads + faculty are definitely not a "close community" - though the undergrads are tight with each other- and year-round internship opportunities are non-existent for the majority of students). Rice might be the closest, as it is in a city (for internships) and there is a resident faculty member and other faculty/admin are involved- but classes are not held within the college. Yale students don't have classes in their houses. Even at Hogwarts, classes were by subject, not within the individual houses.
  • allyphoeallyphoe Registered User Posts: 1,791 Senior Member
    Yale has classes in each residential college. http://catalog.yale.edu/ycps/subjects-of-instruction/college-seminars/

    That said, Residential College Seminars are intentionally outside of traditional departments, are intentionally limited (four total per student), and only 1/3 of the seats are reserved for students in that college.
  • collegemom3717collegemom3717 Registered User Posts: 5,656 Senior Member
    thank for the amplification, @allyphoe- I was too broad :-)
  • collegemom3717collegemom3717 Registered User Posts: 5,656 Senior Member
    edited October 27
    Actually, I'll correct myself (thanks to @Dustyfeathers!). The Consortium schools are the closest thing to what you are looking for. Take the the Claremont Mckenna group (C-Mck/ Mudd, Pomona, Scripps): separate colleges, but nearly contiguous campuses, each college is self-contained & prides itself on faculty engagement with students. Others include the Massachusetts 5-college and the Pennsylvanian Quaker groups.
  • Houston1021Houston1021 Forum Champion Rice Posts: 712 Forum Champion
    At Rice, each residential college has a Magister (professor and family) that lives in a university owned private home adjacent to each residential college. The magister hosts events for the students throughout the year.
  • DustyfeathersDustyfeathers Registered User Posts: 3,083 Senior Member
    Huh. That's an interesting perspective on the consortium schools, @collegemom3717

    They do have their own distinct personalities and many of the individual schools aren't that big.

    OP the consortium schools (some of them have already been mentioned) include --

    - Claremont group (Claremont MC, Pomona, Harvey Mudd, Scripps, Pitzer) -- all 5 min walk from each other
    - Five Colleges in Massachusetts (Hampshire, Mt. Holyoke, Amherst, UMass Amherst, Smith) -- all have a free bus system among them and are 10-30 minutes apart depending on the school
    - The Quaker Consoritum (Haverford, Bryn Mawr, Swarthmore, UPenn) -- free regular buses among all of the schools but UPenn and for that the students can take a train to Philly -- about a 20 minute trip to Philly. Haverford to BMC is like 10 minute trip. Swarthmore to Haverford and BMC is like 30 minute trip.

    Basically if you get into one of the consortium schools you can take classes at any of the others. Each school has a distinct personality.
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