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Yale/Hogwarts/Oxford/Cambridge Like Residential College System

CupCakeMuffinsCupCakeMuffins Registered User Posts: 626 Member
edited October 2 in Colleges and Universities
Which schools in United States offer a similar experience?
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Replies to: Yale/Hogwarts/Oxford/Cambridge Like Residential College System

  • DeepBlue86DeepBlue86 Registered User Posts: 921 Member
    edited October 2
    Everyone gets sorted into a House at Harvard, but it doesn’t happen until sophomore year. Vanderbilt also does it this way. Like Yale, Princeton sorts first-years into colleges before they arrive on campus, but Princeton’s version differs in that many juniors and seniors don’t live in the residential colleges, and because of the eating club system there.
  • CupCakeMuffinsCupCakeMuffins Registered User Posts: 626 Member
    edited October 2
    That's somewhat similar in some ways but which schools other than Yale, offer an established residential college system like oxford and Cambridge, where you live and eat and play and often take many classes at your own college and have an intimate family like small community for all four years.
  • skieuropeskieurope Super Moderator Posts: 38,271 Super Moderator
    often take many classes at your own college
    Unlike Oxbridge, despite what Wikipedia says, courses are not specific to the residential college at Yale (or Harvard or Princeton). Some very small number of courses are held in the residential college as a supplement, not in lieu of.
    Everyone gets sorted into a House at Harvard, but it doesn’t happen until sophomore year. Vanderbilt also does it this way. Like Yale, Princeton sorts first-years into colleges before they arrive on campus, but Princeton’s version differs in that many juniors and seniors don’t live in the residential colleges, and because of the eating club system there.
    Rice is another.
  • LindagafLindagaf Registered User Posts: 8,353 Senior Member
    Franklin and Marshall does something like this, as does Union College, though they don't actually have classes in their houses. These colleges are small LACs, so there is no need to have dedicated classes for one housing community. There are probably other LACs that have similar arrangements. You may want to consider a wide range of colleges, not just ultra-selective ones.
  • GatormamaGatormama Registered User Posts: 1,030 Senior Member
    In terms of looks, Sewanee often gets compared to Hogwarts. We visited; beautiful, beautiful place, but it's not right for D19 (very small). The honors kids wear black robes, a la Oxbridge/Hogwarts.
  • momofsenior1momofsenior1 Registered User Posts: 3,312 Senior Member
    Purdue's honors college sorts into houses and has a house cup (complete with an app that tracks points) ; )
  • chablechable Registered User Posts: 14 New Member
  • AlmostThere2018AlmostThere2018 Registered User Posts: 850 Member
    Rice does this.
  • washugradwashugrad Registered User Posts: 702 Member
    UC San Diego has a bit of this... the large university is broken down into 6 colleges, each with a housing area on campus and its own set of breadth requirements. You can major in anything from any of the 6 colleges, although some fits are better than others. Kids rank their choices when they apply to the University and are given their assignment when they get accepted to UCSD. Not sure if you can swap once you are in. From what I understand, upper classmen typically don't live on campus. So you'd have your breadth requirement courses mostly within your college but other classes could be with anyone. (This was my oldest kid's 'also-ran' school so we looked into it heavily but she didn't end up going, so I could have some details wrong).
  • DustyfeathersDustyfeathers Registered User Posts: 3,076 Senior Member
    UC Santa Cruz is divided into individual colleges, each with its own mini program, personality, and specialties --I'm not sure how they "sort" however. I doubt they use a sorting hat, though.
  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 Registered User Posts: 38,821 Senior Member
    Durham would qualify but it's in the UK :D
    Rice is the one that seems closest to the sorting hat situation.
  • Emsmom1Emsmom1 Registered User Posts: 1,011 Senior Member
    Franklin and Marshall
  • LoveTheBardLoveTheBard Registered User Posts: 1,958 Senior Member
    Rice indeed comes closest to Yale/Oxbridge residential college system.
  • Twoin18Twoin18 Registered User Posts: 862 Member
    And Rice even has a pretty unique exchange program with Cambridge (https://ccl.rice.edu/students/fellowships/rice-nominated-fellowships/cd-broad-fellowship/)
  • ChoatieMomChoatieMom Registered User Posts: 4,763 Senior Member
    I lived, ate, played, and took classes in the Residential College at the University of Michigan. In my experience, Michigan was a small LAC.
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