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Transfer from Columbia

seasattendeeseasattendee Registered User Posts: 1 New Member
edited January 2012 in Columbia University
Hello,

Contrary to what many people may believe, going to Columbia or any Ivy league may not be what it's all cracked up to be. I'll admit I am only a freshman in my second semester but I'm finding things that are fundamentally wrong in my eyes. Like the ridiculous competition, arrogance, and stress. But that's only scratching the surface and to avoid a long drawn out complaint I'll dive into what I really want to talk about.

I'm an engineer, hoping to do chemical engineering and am here at SEAS. I'm not enjoying it as much as I'd hope and debating on transferring to Kansas State University.
Reasons:

1) As you all know, Columbia is very liberal so the education is different and I feel more directed to becoming a leader or some sort of financial, medical, lawyer type degree while K-State is more to the point, technical courses. In other words, I would take more engineering and science related courses I like at K-State.

2) K-State is obviously a lot less expensive (I'd be in state) and on the same note. How much difference would it be to get a degree in chemE from K-State then Columbia if I plan on going into the field?

3) New York feels so foreign to me and so do the people. I realize this attitude may change over time but maybe I don't want it to. Going to K-State is a lot more social and not so foreign so I could keep the same lively personality instead of adopting a new drowned out ignorant, working one.

Help me please and don't say, Columbia obviously is a better school so go there, take into fact I'm wanting to become a chemical engineer and nothing more for a fair amount of time. And please be harsh but fair, thank you to anyone that helps!
Post edited by seasattendee on

Replies to: Transfer from Columbia

  • seafood92seafood92 Registered User Posts: 117 Junior Member
    I'm not in either of the schools you are talking about. Both schools are great but obviously Columbia is more elite. You mentioned that you feel more comfortable in Kansas and that living in New York may affect your grades, which in the end could lead to turmoil on your CV when applying for jobs. I can guarantee that once you get into the workforce if you have somewhat of a similar GPA in either school an employer is more likely to choose an Ivy League over a state university. That's the reality, but you probably knew that.

    Now if your GPA is tanked at Columbia, say a 2.9-3.1 and you have a 3.6-3.8 (still going to be hard for a chemical engineer) they may choose the state university over the lower GPA. I'm not sure because I'm not an employer, but I am close to a CEO of a mechanical engineering company (Mother's employer) and he has stressed that university prestige DOES matter when he looks at CVs.

    The class instruction should not be that different. Of course at Columbia the instruction level will be a little higher and that is because the nature of the Universities. That does not mean that Kansas City will not prepare you to become a great chemical engineer. You were bright enough to enter Columbia University and you will likely end up with a job either way. Do what you feel is right.
  • mmmcdowemmmcdowe Registered User Posts: 2,353 Senior Member
    You obviously feel that Kansas is a better fit for you. If you are confident in this fact, then the obvious choice is to transfer. Just make sure you are comfortable, because it will be a hell of a lot harder coming back than leaving.
This discussion has been closed.