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Columbia for I-banking

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Replies to: Columbia for I-banking

  • karotkarot Registered User Posts: 1,200 Senior Member
    Why the binary distinction? Clearly, there exists a hierarchy between targets and non-targets. But among the targets, individual ability trumps school affiliation.

    I agree that it's not a binary distinction, but I don't entirely agree with the statement that individual ability trumps school affiliation.

    First you have to define individual ability.

    GPA? If that were true, then why are there people with a 3.6 and didn't land an interview when another person from the same school with the same Major but lower GPA landed an actual offer? Yeah, GPA does factor into individual ability but there are other things.

    Extracurriculars? Again, the more the better (in terms of both quantity and quality) but ECs alone won't get you in.

    Interviewing ability? Yes but that helps you land the job. Some people get dinged before they can even interview.

    The list goes on. My point is, you guys are wasting time disagreeing over this point.
  • wifey99999999wifey99999999 Registered User Posts: 381 Member
    Is it common for a Operations Research student to go into I-Banking job?

    I know Financial Engineering students pretty much all go to i banking, but what about Operations Research students?
  • objobsobjobs - Posts: 192 Junior Member
    karot wrote:
    Example:


    School A has undergrad population of 100 and grad population of 10. Assume for the sake of simplicity that under and phd last one year.

    All undergrads at school A decide to go to grad school, so 0% are "pre-professional." But, because the grad school has a max population of 10, we get 10/100*1000=100 = Score A. The other students have to go to another school for grad school.

    Now let's look at school B. It looks exactly the same as School A (# under at A= # under at B and # phd at A=# phd at B) with the excpetion that people at B hate phd and just want to work/go to law/medicine/etc.

    Because of this, 0% of undergrads at B are going to get a PHD and 100% are "pre-professional" Size of Phd program stays the same and just recruits from other undergrad colleges for Phd class. Score B = 10/100*1000=100= Score of A.

    So two scenarios:
    School A in which 100% of undergrads are "pre-professional" and school A gets score of 100.
    School B in which 0 % of undergrads are "pre-professional" and school B gets score of 100.

    Your score on this list tells us little to nothing about the percentage of undergrads at the school that are "pre-professional". What affects the scores are the sizes of the under and grad programs.


    I am fairly certain that the study tracks whether or not undergraduate alumni/ae receive PhDs, not where they received them. But if you want to look at the (NSF) list which shows the "percentage of undergrads [that] go on to [successfully] pursue PHDs," here you go:

    nsf.gov - SRS Baccalaureate Origins of S&E Doctorate Recipients - US National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • objobsobjobs - Posts: 192 Junior Member
    columbia probably has more folks than other ivies that enter into education, non-profit and in general social justice work - i will offer anecdotally.


    Again, with the anecdotes.
  • karotkarot Registered User Posts: 1,200 Senior Member
    I am fairly certain that the study tracks whether or not undergraduate alumni/ae receive PhDs, not where they received them. But if you want to look at the (NSF) list which shows the "percentage of undergrads [that] go on to [successfully] pursue PHDs," here you go:

    nsf.gov - SRS Baccalaureate Origins of S&E Doctorate Recipients - US National Science Foundation (NSF)

    Thanks for the data, this is much more useful. You know better than to give me "fairly certain"
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