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Should I refrain from applying to CC ED because of finances?

cwc73cwc73 14 replies6 threadsRegistered User New Member
edited September 2010 in Columbia University
I'm in LOVE with every aspect of Colubmia: the core, NYC, the campus. The feeling I got when I first walked on campus was indescribable. It's definitely my first choice, and I would totally apply ED. However, my parents don't want me to because, if I get in, I would only receive one financial aid package (and finances are definitely an issue). Columbia is definitely one of the more expensive schools I'm applying to (especially since it's in NYC). Should I wait until RD so I can get other aid packages or apply ED and, if accepted, hope everything works out financially?

Thanks!
edited September 2010
8 replies
Post edited by cwc73 on
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Replies to: Should I refrain from applying to CC ED because of finances?

  • StarsAlignedStarsAligned 435 replies29 threadsRegistered User Member
    If financial aid is that important to you, you should not apply for the binding ED.
    I would take a look at a few calculators and see if you like the results before deciding.
    Just FYI, I hear many cases where RD acceptances can bargain their finaid packages with better offers from other schools ... this may be a huge benefit for you!
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  • cwc73cwc73 14 replies6 threadsRegistered User New Member
    Thanks so much StarsAligned! I'll look into other options. If it's meant to be, it's meant to be. Right?
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  • CrimsonFutureCrimsonFuture 134 replies1 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    Or, if Columbia really is the school you will go to if you get in, apply ED. You don't like the fin. aid, appeal or break the ED binding contract citing financial circumstances. For whatever fraction of a percent advantage there is for applying ED, are you willing to hedge your chances of acceptance over a package that can be negotiated? This is an Ivy League school, it can afford to allocate more aid to you if you get in.
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  • StarsAlignedStarsAligned 435 replies29 threadsRegistered User Member
    I still think you shouldn't limit your options if you don't need to. Breaking ED contract is a rare occurrence, and it's for giving the option of a cheaper state school, rather than choosing another Ivy.
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  • cwc73cwc73 14 replies6 threadsRegistered User New Member
    Thanks for all of your advice, starsaligned and crimsonfuture. I definitely need to sit down and have a serious talk with my parents about this. Wouldn't it be great if finances didn't need to determine which schools you can apply to?
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  • cwc73cwc73 14 replies6 threadsRegistered User New Member
    Also, starsaligned--I was wondering if you could look at another recent thread I started ("CHANCE ME for Columbia College") and tell me your opinion about my chances. I would really appreciate it!
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  • pwoodspwoods 1078 replies18 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    "This is an Ivy League school, it can afford to allocate more aid to you if you get in."

    But it won't. John Kluge may have successfully appealed his scholarship offer in 1937 but these days, you pretty much get what you get. Of course they won't force you to attend, and they'll never ask you to pay more than you can afford, but Columbia (like all private universities) is pretty ****ing expensive. If you make less than $60,000/year, you'll pay nothing and if you make less than $100,000/year, you're fine. If you make significantly more than that, then it will be painful but on the other hand, you can afford it. I don't know if financial aid is really stingier if you apply ED, but I do know that you could stuck paying a lot (though again, never more than your family can actually afford). You have to decide whether a Columbia education is worth it, and if you're sure that you want to attend and pay the tuition.
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  • karbinkarbin 68 replies13 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    Unless things have drastically changed in the last three years, you can break ED citing insufficient financial aid
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