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Guaranteed Transfer

sexy123sexy123 Registered User Posts: 646 Member
edited October 2005 in Cornell University
if cornell responds back at you with a 2-year guarentee transfer..
meaning you can go to their school after 2 years of study at another 'college of ur choice' but you must have have a GPA of 3.3 after 2 years..
would it be better to attend a 2 year community college
or a 4 year university?
an easy college where you can easily get a 4.0?
whats ur feedback on this..
thanks
Post edited by sexy123 on

Replies to: Guaranteed Transfer

  • hopeful4cornellhopeful4cornell Registered User Posts: 378 Member
    4 year university.. and heres my reasoning. say you go to a place like mich or uva... if you get a >3.3 for first two years you're in great shape to do well at cornell. you might even like it better at those schools if you're really doing well and decide to stay there(you have that option). If you don't get over a 3.3, maybe you're not cut out for Cornell at that point and it would be better just to stay with your newly made friends at a still-good university.

    If you go the 2-year CC route, I guarantee you'll be less motivated to work hard and do well. While you may pull out a great GPA, it won't mean much and you'll suddenly feel ovewhelmed when you're taking 3rd year classes at Cornell. Plus, there is the possibility you could get stuck at a CC and I'm sure you wouldn't want to do that.
  • gomestargomestar Registered User Posts: 4,699 Senior Member
    i'd have to say it denpends on your financial situation.

    If you can afford other private schools w/o a problem, then go for it. Otherwise, do the 2 year CC route. You wont be less motivated to work hard and do well. Last year, before comming to Cornell, i split classes between a community college and Syracuse University. I enjoyed my CC classes much more. Against popular opinion, my CC classes wern't easy and unmotivating. In fact, i liked them alot more than my Syracuse classes. They were significantly smaller, teachers were much better, and it was much easier to participate in discussion. I knew syracuse was a rip off when i saw two of my professors at the community college. They taught the same course and everything. I dont think you'll be overwhelmed when you come to cornell as long as you take the proper courses. Obviously, only taking gym classes and easy electives wont suit you well. If you're going into sciences, take the bio, chem, physics, calc, whatever else you need. Create a tough schedule at the CC, and you'll be fine. Comming from a CC, i aced my first three tests here at Cornell. I was prepared nicely. And believe me, you wont get stuck at a CC. If you suck, maybe, but if you're motivated enough to want to go to Cornell, you'll be fine.

    Where ever you go, just work hard and don't give up. I'd go for the CC route, it'll save you loads of cash in the end. You'll need that cash when you finally enroll here.
  • UCLAriUCLAri Registered User Posts: 14,740 Senior Member
    If you go the 2-year CC route, I guarantee you'll be less motivated to work hard and do well. While you may pull out a great GPA, it won't mean much and you'll suddenly feel ovewhelmed when you're taking 3rd year classes at Cornell. Plus, there is the possibility you could get stuck at a CC and I'm sure you wouldn't want to do that.

    Blah blah blah, unqualified CC bashing, blah blah blah. Look, I know plenty of people who went to CCs first, pulled off amazing GPAs (me included) and went to our 4 year schools and then kicked butt. And really, my 4.0 during my first year of school means something. I worked hard for those grades. And I was never overwhelmed at UCLA, either.
  • hopeful4cornellhopeful4cornell Registered User Posts: 378 Member
    I stand corrected. I don't have the CC experience to say that you'll be less motivated. and we have two people here ^^ that have taken the CC route and done well.

    still i recommend a traditional route if u have the resources to do so. it just provides you more options in the end and you're not restricted to thinking about cornell for the next two years (assuming you don't want a CC degree).
This discussion has been closed.