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Bio & Society vs. Bio

webwriter1001webwriter1001 Registered User Posts: 1 New Member
edited May 2013 in Cornell University
For those of you who have had either major - Biology & Society or Biological Sciences - what are the pros and cons of each?
Rather, what careers could I possibly look forward to in either field? Which do you think is the better one to do, whether there are less difficult courses to fulfill, or whether it takes more time to generally spend in school for it?
Please help; advice is appreciated.
Post edited by webwriter1001 on

Replies to: Bio & Society vs. Bio

  • EquilibriumEquilibrium Registered User Posts: 1,217 Senior Member
    Take a thorough look at the major requirements for each, and see which major matches your interests more.

    As for bio sciences, most majors are either premed/health and/or go onto grad school in biology. Some go on to get jobs afterwards, but that is much less common.

    I don't know much about bio & society, but it tends to be a little more "humanities" oriented than plain biological sciences. Most people in that major tend to go onto grad school and/or medical school afterwards as well.
  • gatewaysgateways Registered User Posts: 45 Junior Member
    I'm not a bio and society major, though I am in Science & Technology Studies (both majors are offered by the same department) - Bio & Society is more interdisciplinary than just a bio degree - as @equilibrium said, Bio & Society is a little more oriented to the humanities - I'm assuming that in the graduation requirements, you're not taking as many "hard science" bio courses (though I'm not sure, I haven't compared the requirements), but take some courses that discuss environmental ethics, history of medicine/science, science/medicine/agriculture and society, controversy over GMOs, conservation and governance, etc. I know some people in Bio & Society, and a lot of them are planning on going to medical school, though I also know some who want to work in public health and other related fields.
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