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Location of Dartmouth

smashacesmashace Registered User Posts: 132 Junior Member
edited July 2010 in Dartmouth College
hey fellow CC'ers,
I'm considering applying to Dartmouth next year, and I was wondering how people that go there or that have visited the campus like the overall feel.

thanks
Post edited by smashace on
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Replies to: Location of Dartmouth

  • DmouthGrad2014DmouthGrad2014 Registered User Posts: 103 Junior Member
    This is an extremely broad and subjective question. You'll have to visit for yourself to see if you like it, so submit an application anyway -- and if you're admitted, attend Dimensions.
  • alexcuadalexcuad Registered User Posts: 233 Junior Member
    I visited in April and it is a great location. The campus itself is much larger than the town of Hanover, which has around 10,000 residents (most of which are students). You won't get as many courtyards and greens as for example Yale or Princeton, but the large green in the front is beautiful. I'm from Colorado so the weather seemed like an improvement (we still had snow at the time), yet is was noticeably colder than the other Ivies further south. I would say that the people in Hanover were tied with the Princetonites as first place in friendliness, both on campus and in town (this is in comparison to the other colleges on the trip, namely Amherst, Brown, Yale, and a brief look at Penn). It's architecture is not as striking as that of Yale, for instance, and I kinda dislike the rotation of dorm rooms essentially every quarter. The Residential College system at Yale was definitely more appealing, yet every school has its own culture. I would conclude by saying that after this visit, as far as campus and location go, I would rank Dartmouth third out of the schools I visited (after Princeton and Yale respectively). Hope this helps.
  • ConsolationConsolation Registered User Posts: 22,698 Senior Member
    alexcuad, students do not rotate dorm rooms every quarter. The only scenario in which that might occur is one in which you are away from campus for a succession of alternating terms. As in, in residence F sophomore year, away on an internship W, in residence S, in residence for sophomore summer in a different room, abroad F junior year, in residence W junior year. In that case, you would get a new room when you returned each time, since obviously the college is not going to be holding an empty room for you while you are away. If you are in residence for all of freshman year, for example, you will have the same room the entire time. There is some method by which friends can "pull" you into a room or suite with them, but I don't know exactly how it works.

    The potential for dislocation is a downside of the flexibility offered by the D plan, no doubt. It is probably one reason why so many kids at D decide to go Greek: the house provides a long term home base.

    I do agree that the residential college system at Yale is one of its greatest strengths, and a very attractive feature. Too bad more schools don't follow that model. Some schools try to set it up--Princeton and Williams, for example--but lack the physical plant actually designed for the college system. Harvard and Rice are two other schools that are known for their residential colleges.
  • alexcuadalexcuad Registered User Posts: 233 Junior Member
    Sorry for making that assumption ... my student guide when I was there was a junior and had already switched dorms six times, and knew he was about to again a few months later. I will agree, though, that is probably not typical.
  • I VI V Registered User Posts: 845 Member
    I have a question regarding the tours. I'm signed up for one this Saturday and on the Calender it only said that there were "tours" available--it mentioned nothing about an info session. Is it implied that an info session is part of the tour or is there actually no info session?
  • coureurcoureur Registered User Posts: 11,386 Senior Member
    ^Info session is usually held in McNutt Hall just before the tour.
  • bluebayoubluebayou Registered User Posts: 25,393 Senior Member
    sry, no Info sessions in May. (scroll down towards the bottom)

    Calendar & Event Signup
  • smashacesmashace Registered User Posts: 132 Junior Member
    One of my friends who visited dartmouth said that she didn't like it's ruralness. How is the area around dartmouth? Is it completely rural, or are there things to do around dartmouth? Also, how is the food here?
  • bluebayoubluebayou Registered User Posts: 25,393 Senior Member
    One of my friends who visited dartmouth said that she didn't like it's ruralness.

    A small town is definitely personal taste. Some kids long to be in NYC (or DC, or...), while others desire the opposite in a collegiate experience. Some prefer a suburban campus...
  • DmouthGrad2014DmouthGrad2014 Registered User Posts: 103 Junior Member
    It annoys me, to an extent, when people cite Dartmouth's rural location as a reason not to attend for a few reasons.

    First, you're in college to study. As such, you'll spend most of your time attending classes and hitting the books.

    Second, you'll (hopefully) be involved in extracurricular activities. Those will take up most of the remaining time of your day.

    Third, at Dartmouth, you're just a few hours from NYC, Boston, and Montreal. If you're longing for the city life, hit one up for the weekend.

    Even if you attend an urban university, you won't be in the city every day. At Dartmouth, you have all the benefits of a rural campus -- natural beauty, space, skiing, hiking, etc. -- and some of the world's best cities at the tip of your finger.
  • LobzzLobzz Registered User Posts: 1,970 Senior Member
    Although I've never visited Dartmouth, it's campus/location definitely appeal to me very much. It epitomizes what an "ivy" should look like, in my eyes.

    But then again... people have different tastes.
  • coureurcoureur Registered User Posts: 11,386 Senior Member
    >>It annoys me, to an extent, when people cite Dartmouth's rural location as a reason not to attend for a few reasons.<<

    It doesn't annoy me - not any more than it annoys me that some cite Columbia's or Harvard's hectic urban locations as reasons for not wanting to attend, preferring a more bucolic setting. All the good things you say about Dartmouth are true, but not everyone has the same preferences.
  • smashacesmashace Registered User Posts: 132 Junior Member
    Ok I see... I guess it just depends on the person's impression of the campus and whether they can see themselves at Dartmouth. The main reason I ask is because I'm curious to how the food choices are at Dartmouth (mostly because I am vegetarian). I was just wondering how the surrounding areas were so I could see whether there would be other places that I could eat at just in case Dartmouth didn't offer stellar meals.
  • LobzzLobzz Registered User Posts: 1,970 Senior Member
    I'm 112% sure you won't be the only vegetarian on campus.
  • bluebayoubluebayou Registered User Posts: 25,393 Senior Member
    Dartmouth offers vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free meals, as well as Kosher and many ethnic choices.
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