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CC or Post-Bac?

Jozhou6891Jozhou6891 Registered User Posts: 15 New Member
edited May 2011 in Pre-Med Topics
Trying for Med-School but since i am a business major for undergrad i would need to get my preqs out of the way. Do you guys suggest a CC or a post-bac?
From my understand post-bac is more formulated towards med-school and a CC will require more self-motivation but cost a boat load of money less.
Do med schools look at the institution that you did your preqs at?
And what are the classes that I would need to take from a CC if I decide to go that route and save some money?


Thanks in advance
Post edited by Jozhou6891 on

Replies to: CC or Post-Bac?

  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Forum Champion Financial Aid, Forum Champion Alabama Posts: 84,178 Forum Champion
    ????

    Have you already graduated from college?

    If so, is there a instate public that offers a post-bacc?
  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom Registered User Posts: 9,700 Senior Member
    Do NOT do your pre- med requirements at a CC. Since you will not have any higher level science classes taken at a 4 year college, your coursework will be severely discounted when it comes to admissions and you'll likely get rejected. Everywhere.

    Since you have already graduated, you MUST take your pre reqs at a 4 year college or university if you want to be competitive for admission.

    The exact coursework you will need to take depends somewhat on the med schools you are applying to.

    In general, you'll need:

    2 semesters /3 quarters of introductory biology with lab
    2 semesters general chemistry with lab
    2 semesters organic chemistry with lab
    2 semesters general physics with lab
    1-2 semesters of college level mathematics (generally interpreted to mean 1 semester calculus and 1 semester of statistics)
    1 semester composition/writing

    Some schools require additional coursework including, but limited to: biochemistry, genetics, anatomy & physiology, calc 2, upper level humanities, a second semester of writing.

    Check the website for each medical school you think you might apply to for their requirements. OR buy a copy of the MSAR. ($15 for web access; $25 for print version + web access)
  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Forum Champion Financial Aid, Forum Champion Alabama Posts: 84,178 Forum Champion
    Dumb question.

    Does a graduate have to do an official post-bac program? Or, can a graduate just enroll in these classes at a local state univ and then apply to med school?
  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom Registered User Posts: 9,700 Senior Member
    Well, D1 didn't do a formal post-bacc. She took her coursework on her own part time at the state U in town. (Of course the state U in town is our state flagship....)

    A college grad can take their pre-reqs on their own at any 4 year college or university. You don't need a formal program. You just need to fulfill the requirements.
  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom Registered User Posts: 9,700 Senior Member
    RE: post #3

    That should read: Some schools require additional coursework including, but NOT limited to: biochemistry, genetics, anatomy & physiology, calc 2, upper level humanities, a second semester of writing.
  • vpappas83vpappas83 Registered User Posts: 126 Junior Member
    WayOutWestMom took the words out of my mouth and hit all the most important points.. here's my 2 cents...

    the writing course needs to be writing-intensive and not necessrily an english course.

    Also note a post-bac program treats students as degree enrolled (usually offering a certificate) and includes great things like the opportunity to receive the all important committee letter and even more so the tuition of a full-time student. Additionally, through most post-bacs you get early registration and sometimes guaranteed space in prereq courses. You can look at some great post-bac programs listed on the aamc.org site, look for "career changers". Some include MCAT test prep, and even affiliations with some universities which can guarantee you interviews if you can keep a certain GPA (3.6 usually).

    If you take the classes on your own most schools have specific rules about registration that make it difficult to get the classes you need, and charge per credit hour.
  • Jozhou6891Jozhou6891 Registered User Posts: 15 New Member
    thx alot for all the responses, i guess the general feelings are that taking my preqs at a CC is not worth the risk to justify the savings.
    Too bad i missed the post-bac program for this year therefore i have to wait a whole year. I am planning on doing some volunteer work and maybe do 2 intro science classes to see how i might coop. Anything else I might consider starting right now while i still have a little bit of free time?
  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom Registered User Posts: 9,700 Senior Member
    I think that brushing up on your science and doing volunteer work--both medically related and general community service--is plenty right now.

    Where would you do the science classes?

    Remember that even if you only audit a class, it must be reported on your AMCAS application.
  • Jozhou6891Jozhou6891 Registered User Posts: 15 New Member
    In terms of my science preqs I think they are gonna be done either at a post-bac program starting next year in august or i might go back to my cal-state and enroll for a second bachelor and get the preqs out of the way like that hopefully starting this year.

    What do you guys think? Is that something viable and what major should i pick if i go the second bac route since they are both gonna both end up to be about 3 years.
  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom Registered User Posts: 9,700 Senior Member
    I don't think it matters what you pick for your second bachelors's, although you might have an easier time getting into the science classes you need if you're a science major--since they'll get priority for limited seats at registration time.
  • vpappas83vpappas83 Registered User Posts: 126 Junior Member
    Stay AWAY from BIO... it's the most common degree application to med school.... May I suggest chemistry? Biochem?
This discussion has been closed.