right arrow
Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04

150 hr rule in Texas...do other states have this?

13

Replies to: 150 hr rule in Texas...do other states have this?

  • ordinarylivesordinarylives 3173 replies43 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    See, and I thought quite few charged for AP credit! From what I've seen, the charges are small, but still...
    · Reply · Share
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 78229 replies690 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    GTAustin wrote:
    I'm curious what tuition rebate eligibility means.

    It is presumably an incentive for a Texas resident student to graduate from a Texas public university in the minimum possible number of credits for his/her degree (up to 3 extra credits allowed), to allow the state subsidy of the public universities to be stretched to cover as many students as possible (instead of a smaller number of students taking more credits worth of courses each).
    http://www.collegeforalltexans.com/apps/financialaid/tofa2.cfm?ID=447
    · Reply · Share
  • 3scoutsmom3scoutsmom 5524 replies337 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Following the link from ucbalumnus to the FAQ link Question #4
    http://www.collegeforalltexans.com/index.cfm?objectid=C11E6975-F85E-C1C8-73B1AEEF1E771640

    NM students at UTD would not be eligible anyway because you do indeed have to actually pay $1000 in tuition to get the rebate. dang! TANSTAAFL!
    · Reply · Share
  • GTAustinGTAustin 1180 replies9 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    @3scoutsmom, I'm not complaining!
    · Reply · Share
  • STEMFamilySTEMFamily 1322 replies5 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited June 2016
    My D has a warning that she is about to hit the limit at Arizona State. She is a NM Scholar going into her senior year. The page says the limit is 180 and she currently has 151. 41 of those are AP credits. Strange that they count the AP hours but do NOT count the 3 credits from a duel enrollment class that they transferred and even counted toward her minor. With 2 majors and a minor, she has had several semesters at 18 and above hours but will finish in 4 years with one 3 credit class this summer that isn't covered by her scholarship.

    It really doesn't seem fair to count AP credits against the limit, especially when they specifically state that transfer credits do not count. They do not ask you what credits you want accepted.

    I guess we are going to have to call the school about this. Her scholarship is full tuition for 8 semesters and this limit was never mentioned.
    edited June 2016
    · Reply · Share
  • texaspgtexaspg 16506 replies340 threadsForum Champion Pre-Med & Medical Forum Champion
    People graduate normally with 120 semester hours. Isn't 180 a lot?
    · Reply · Share
  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone 22972 replies17 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    ^^ Yep, and that's what they are trying to avoid, the 6 year undergrad student.
    · Reply · Share
  • GTAustinGTAustin 1180 replies9 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    But if you are going in with 30 to 40 hours from AP/Dual Credit and take 18 hrs/semester for 4 years, 180 hours is very doable in 4 years.
    · Reply · Share
  • STEMFamilySTEMFamily 1322 replies5 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited June 2016
    ^this

    I agree that 180 is alot if you are not including AP and transfer hours.

    My D actually has 41 AP hours plus 6 hours of transfer dual credit from high school which only leaves 133 available. All of her hours are actually contributing to her majors and minor. Looking back she probably would not do the minor again, but do we really expect that students should know going in exactly what they want to study?

    These rules may eliminate the 6+ year undergrad but I don't see how they are going to necessarily increase the 4 and 5 year graduation rates. I think it would make much more sense to track rate of progress toward whatever degree/s the student is admitted to.

    These policies do nothing about students who take more years because they retake classes several times to pass which seems to happen a lot in D's major at ASU. In that case, they may take more than 6 years to graduate (or worse not ever get a degree at all) but it isn't because they hit some credit limit.
    edited June 2016
    · Reply · Share
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 78229 replies690 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Regarding students who fail and have to retake courses, note that at least some of the Texas policies count attempted credits, even if the student fails or withdraws from the course after the census date (effectively "wasting" the space in the course).

    It is, however, not very friendly to count credits from before high school graduation (AP, IB, college courses taken while in high school) toward such limits, since high school students usually are not specifically following the course plans for a major and other college degree requirements, so many of the transferred credits earned before high school graduation may end up being generic elective credits.
    · Reply · Share
  • LOUKYDADLOUKYDAD 824 replies18 threadsRegistered User Member
    For those kids coming into state public Us with 50+ hours of AP and/or dual enrollment credit (like my DS18), I could totally imagine a system where they would design aid (merit and otherwise) to encourage these kids to graduate in three years. As a self interested parent the luxury of that fourth year where my kid doesn't have to live in an adult world yet isn't on my couch when I come home from work sounds great. As a taxpayer thinking about the use of scarce resources, not so great. Yes there are some hours within the 50+ total hours that may not necessarily apply to a specific degree, etc. But since at least 30+ do, a fourth year isn't necessary, and if it becomes so it would totally make sense to me if it was on my dime.
    · Reply · Share
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 78229 replies690 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Re: #51

    The main problem with that is that AP and IB credit, where allowed for subject credit and advanced placement, can only be applied to entry-level courses. So the student may not be as far ahead in progress toward graduation in terms of subject credit and placement as s/he may be in credit units. If the student's major has a long prerequisite sequence, then forcing him/her to graduate early due to the AP and IB credit may make scheduling more difficult than graduating on a normal schedule without any AP or IB credit.
    · Reply · Share
  • LOUKYDADLOUKYDAD 824 replies18 threadsRegistered User Member
    I get that issue, but it seems overblown in the sense a kid would have had to have really overloaded in an area in HS to get that far off course.

    Most UG degrees are less than 130 credit hours right? So with the distance between that and 150 hours a kid would have had to have taken more than 7 classes in HS for college credit that wouldn't count toward a degree. From where I am sitting, even though my kid has about every AP available to him, it would still be pretty hard for him to do.

    If you conquer most of the APs, it seems like you will inevitably be covering the gen ed requirements at most schools. More typically you would end up with a few (two or three) extra social science courses than you need. Two or three though, not more than seven.
    · Reply · Share
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 78229 replies690 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Not all schools allow getting out of most or all GE courses with AP or IB credit. At such schools, lots of AP or IB credit may just be free elective credit.
    · Reply · Share
  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan 12668 replies29 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    @ucbalumnus, most majors at American unis take only 1/4 to 1/3 of the 4 years of courses. Granted, there are exceptions (like engineering and other specialized curricula), but someone would typically have to either switch majors a lot or accrue multiple majors to bump against that limit even if they came in with a lot of AP credits. I can see the rationale for this limit. In the case of in-state tuition reductions and merit scholarships, a public school is subsidizing the student.
    · Reply · Share
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 78229 replies690 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    It is closer to 1/3 (sometimes closer to 1/2) than 1/4 for the percentage of courses or credits that a typical liberal arts major consumes out of the total courses or credits. However, the main issue can be the lengths of the prerequisite sequences for required and elective courses in the major, if the student is forced to graduate in a smaller number semesters due to bringing in lots of AP credit that is not applicable to his/her major.
    · Reply · Share
  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan 12668 replies29 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    @ucbalumnus, I've seen plenty of majors where only 1/4 (or less) of total credits are required for a major.

    And for those majors with long sequences, 1. Many times, AP's can be applied to the beginning of those sequences.
    2. Nobody's required to carry 18+ credits each term. Usually, 12 is enough to maintain fulltime status.
    · Reply · Share
  • GTAustinGTAustin 1180 replies9 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    For my DDs, the taking of AP/dual credit from HS has/and will allow them to take classes and dig deeper into two disparate interests in college - one is English Lit and CE, for my younger DD -CS and visual art. Yes, they could both graduate in 3 years in their main focus of study but will take 4 with 18 hrs/semester to follow 2 different passions. Isn't that what college is for to prepare for the future but also to expand yourself personally. Neither of my kids have gone to our state flagship because this was not allowed. Too many kids and not enough seats but at other schools they welcome it.

    · Reply · Share
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 78229 replies690 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I've seen plenty of majors where only 1/4 (or less) of total credits are required for a major.

    What majors at what schools?
    And for those majors with long sequences, 1. Many times, AP's can be applied to the beginning of those sequences.

    One example I know of is physics at Berkeley, which requires about 41% of the total credits for the BA degree. The prerequisite sequence is 6 semesters long for the courses required for the major, but some elective physics courses require 7 semesters to get to them. AP credit can shave off at most one semester from the prerequisite sequence, so the minimum prerequisite sequence is 5 semesters for the required courses, or 6 semesters if the student wants to take some of the electives. In addition, the Berkeley College of Letters and Science does not accept AP credit to fulfill its "seven course breadth requirement".

    Fortunately, for physics majors at Berkeley, the applicable credit unit ceiling does not come into affect unless one goes beyond 8 semesters, and it does not count AP or IB credit, or college credit earned before high school graduation against the credit unit ceiling.
    · Reply · Share
  • texaspgtexaspg 16506 replies340 threadsForum Champion Pre-Med & Medical Forum Champion
    @STEMFamily - It is possible that the warning is a programming trigger which automatically sends out the note about 180 limit.

    Has your D checked with the school or an advisor to see if it means anything to her since she is there on a scholarship? Since she is in her senior year, it will mainly impact her final semester if she takes 18 this semester and has only 12 left over.

    · Reply · Share
This discussion has been closed.

Recent Activity