right arrow
Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04

1980-2017 UCLA Admissions Stats!

KTJordan78KTJordan78 175 replies9 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
This is so cool - totally hidden on the UCLA Admissions site. In 1980 UCLA had an admit rate of 74% and a yield of 67%.

Thots?

http://www.apb.ucla.edu/campus-statistics/admissions
8 replies
· Reply · Share

Replies to: 1980-2017 UCLA Admissions Stats!

  • ericbadmonericbadmon 490 replies14 threadsRegistered User Member
    :D That's hilarious. UCLA with a 74% admit rate.. Can't say I'm surprised tho. Whenever my highschool teachers would talk about how they could get into USC with a C average back in their day, it always sounded like they were from another world
    · Reply · Share
  • Tik1127Tik1127 376 replies24 threadsRegistered User Member
    Speaking of old stuff from UCLA. This uploader took his camera and recorded UCLA in 1987 and 1988. On campus, we even had a bowling alley.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eBrFfmpRiU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zCzkOHdFPGE
    · Reply · Share
  • KTJordan78KTJordan78 175 replies9 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    edited May 2018
    @ericbadmon USC was significantly easier to get into in the 90s than UCLA. In 1997, USC stats were 70% admitted with a median SAT of 1190. UCLA that same year had a 33% acceptance rate with median SAT of 1310.

    USC kids are gonna start **** this thread, but facts are facts on that.
    edited May 2018
    · Reply · Share
  • OldUCalumOldUCalum 1 replies0 threadsRegistered User New Member
    @KTJordan78, @ericbadmon

    As an old UC alum, I thought I'd share some information regarding the UC application policy that was in place prior to about 1986. Up until 1986, prospective students were allowed to apply to only ONE UC campus, so most people would select the ONE UC campus that he/she had great confidence of admission or presumably would select the ONE dream campus with great hope of admission. I can speak for myself and my peers at the time, but we were very careful about which campus basket to place our one application egg. You can see the statistics reflecting some change in 1986 with the jump in applications and the decrease in admission percentage.
    · Reply · Share
  • aggies1989aggies1989 14 replies0 threadsRegistered User New Member
    Can confirm what OldUCalum is saying, when I was a senior in the fall of 1984 and applying to schools, I had to choose the one UC that was a fairly sure bet for me to get in. If I shot too high and didn't get in, then I would have had to go to a CSU. That's why the UC acceptance rates were much higher back then, you had to choose carefully. Quite a bit different from nowadays with the mass application approach.
    · Reply · Share
  • ericbadmonericbadmon 490 replies14 threadsRegistered User Member
    @OldUCalum That's pretty nuts, I've never heard that before. But in general, it is to my knowledge that schools across the board had lower requirements/average admission scores back in the day
    · Reply · Share
  • KTJordan78KTJordan78 175 replies9 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    There also weren't test prep classes, test prep books, "super scores", multiple test-taking options, etc. You took the SAT based on your knowledge from high school, and that was your score. If you took it a second time your scores were averaged together. Also, back in the day there was no such thing as "AP". If you had a 4.0 that meant you literally got an A in every single class in high school. Imagine that.
    · Reply · Share
  • UCBUSCalumUCBUSCalum 1057 replies4 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    All true regarding SAT prep, super scores (UC's don't super score anyway), weighted GPA, etc. Also back in the 80's and prior, UCLA was more known for sports (especially basketball) than academics compared to UC Berkeley. It is quite an accomplishment the past couple of decades that UCLA's academic reputation has ascended to be about on par with UC Berkeley. Today, UCLA is still known for good sport programs. The results is record number of applications and very low acceptance rates the past few years.
    · Reply · Share
This discussion has been closed.

Recent Activity