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Be Straw Free

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Replies to: Be Straw Free

  • anomanderanomander 1651 replies4 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1,655 Senior Member
    Styrofoam vs paper cups isn’t really a cut and dried issue. Sometimes styrofoam is actually the more environmentally friendly choice when you include the environmental cost to produce.

    https://recyclenation.com/2010/03/styrofoam-paper-cups/
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  • doschicosdoschicos 20426 replies209 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 20,635 Senior Member
    @anomander I do agree that one needs to look closely at options as they aren't that cut and dried however in addition to the article saying this "Unless you’re using a paper cup that is biodegradable (most are not), there are some aspects to consider.", the article is 8 years old. There has been a lot of progress since then in making better paper goods that are more green and biodegradable. Lots of the newer cups use plant-based instead of wax or petroleum-based coatings.

    The article also concludes with this, which I agree with:

    "There are better ways to drink your hot beverages, such as using a reusable tumbler, coffee mug or other container you wash and use over and over. If you have to use a disposable paper cup, find out if the establishment you are buying your drink from uses biodegradable cups. If they do, that is the way to go. As the cup industry moves away from the traditional method of manufacturing the current unrecyclable paper cup into a more biodegradable version, the battle between Styrofoam and paper cups may take a turn. In a scenario where the paper cup is biodegradable, a paper cup may win."

    Plastic has its uses. It's more about getting away from single use plastic products which have increased exponentially in the past few decades.

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  • anomanderanomander 1651 replies4 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1,655 Senior Member
    Yup, I’ve been using the same vacuum-insulated tumbler I bought from Starbucks for the past 15+ years! That thing is indestructible.
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  • lookingforwardlookingforward 32627 replies349 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 32,976 Senior Member
    Lol, notice you diss "feel good efforts," but willingly tell us yours. Sorry, but little bits do add up. The alternative is to give up and live only for one's own wants.

    And Tatin might suggest you don't need red Solo cups to play beer pong. Back in the day, people used jars or other glassware. Let's not forget the pollution created by manufacturing and transporting. And washing.

    Just do your best, folks. Try to be aware.
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  • dietz199dietz199 3575 replies73 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 3,648 Senior Member
    edited July 2018
    Lol, notice you diss "feel good efforts," but willingly tell us yours

    Actually, ours were done without fanfare, public announcement or kudos. In fact, some - like the metal lunch box, butcher paper wrapped sandwiches and washing foil - were ridiculed. The actions and behaviors weren't undertaken to garner attention, accolades, political gain or to announce to the world our elevated moral status. Just did it because it was the right - and financially prudent - thing to do. And therein lies the difference.

    As for the glass jars for beer pong...well...those are currently in use for our home canned goods. Once the pickles, pears and jam is eaten they will become available.
    edited July 2018
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  • doschicosdoschicos 20426 replies209 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 20,635 Senior Member
    edited July 2018
    "The actions and behaviors weren't undertaken to garner attention, accolades, political gain or to announce to the world our elevated moral status. Just did it because it was the right - and financially prudent - thing to do."

    You're being awfully judge-y and assuming you know others' motivations when you don't. Bet most people are doing it because they care about the environment and our planet. That isn't driven by wanting to garner attention. Why so angry about it? Seems like you're "triggered" by this thread, to use your wording. I really don't get it. We're just chatting about reducing usage of single use products and creating less trash. You can care and make some personal changes or, as evidenced by your posts, you could care less and do your own thing. Maybe you fall into the "fake climate change" camp, too. :-??


    Your practices seem very much driven by fiscal motivations much like my grandparents and, to a lesser extent, my parents did as a result of living through the great depression. The motivation is different from environmentalism but the results were that things were reused and not throw away which was better for the environment, IMO. Now, so much is made to be used and tossed, even what is referred to as durable goods (appliances and such) aren't as durable as they used to be creating too much crap. Cars are lasting longer which is a good thing.
    edited July 2018
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  • iaparentiaparent 249 replies1 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 250 Junior Member
    I am going to jump in to defend dietz a little bit, I agree that some of the "movements" are a bit ridiculous. Decreasing the use of straws is good but is it an effective use of government resources to mandate/legislate the issue? If we are going to legislate to reduce plastic waste maybe something other than straws would be more impactful.

    How about legislating retail packaging be reduced? Why does a one inch USB drive require a six in square package (that is impossible to remove)? Requiring different packaging of retail items would surely have more of an impact than straws. Why do stores/clothing companies use plastic strips (not sure what to call them) to attached price tags? These are certainly as difficult to recycle as straws, should we legislate that stores start using a different method?

    The two examples above are things the consumer has no control over (and there are many others) but would appear to be at least as detrimental as straws. We have a choice to use a straw and those that want to make a difference can. I just think if we are going to expend time and resources legislating why not do it in an area where the consumer can not do it on their own?
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  • csfmapcsfmap 445 replies14 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 459 Member
    I have a knee jerk response to those 'feel good' measures which really don't do much except make those who decide they're a good idea...feel good about themselves.

    Americans reportedly use 500 million straws per day! Even if that number is exaggerated, straws are clearly a problem, not just a feel good measure. They are totally unnecessary. Except for people with medical needs, straws aren’t needed to consume a beverage. It’s something we use for a few minutes then throw away to remain in our environment for up to 200 years.

    Not using straws is a simple thing that hopefully leads people to do bigger things, like eliminating all single use plastics.

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  • doschicosdoschicos 20426 replies209 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 20,635 Senior Member
    https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/american-airlines-bans-plastic-straws/

    "American Airlines’ announcement is part of a growing movement against single-use plastics, especially straws, which are seen as low-hanging fruit in the broader pursuit of sustainability."

    ^ I think that quote sums it up well. It's not that other plastic products or packaging aren't an issue. It's the beauty of the straw free movement - a good start because it is a pretty easy thing to give up for the majority of people and therefore an easy fix. It also gets people thinking and talking about about other ways they can eliminate single-use plastics and that's all good, IMO. It's a good first step, as the article also notes.
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  • ScipioScipio 8464 replies477 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 8,941 Senior Member
    "If you have a disability that requires the use of a straw or if you just prefer to use one, (lemon water or whatever), no one is saying no to ALL straws."

    You are indeed saying that. It's right in the title of this thread.
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  • doschicosdoschicos 20426 replies209 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 20,635 Senior Member
    Sounds like you and your community are not a good fit at all.

    For those of us living in jurisdictions where little is legislated, it's up to each person to make their own stand.

    "damages done each and every day as cars sit in traffic, idling - for hours on the weekends"

    Not to mention the waste of human time and energy. Both wastes are a big pet peeve of mine. Lots of hidden costs in many things that people forget to factor in like saying alternative energy sources are too expensive but not factoring in the cost of pollution or our involvement in parts of the world and, at times, wars just to ensure access to oil.

    However, I still think working on the low-hanging fruit like straws is still a good and very easy thing. It doesn't preclude us from tackling other issues as well.
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  • dietz199dietz199 3575 replies73 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 3,648 Senior Member
    edited July 2018
    I figure I offer my community the diversity of thought it desperately needs :)
    edited July 2018
    Post edited by MaineLonghorn on
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  • MomofWildChildMomofWildChild 22549 replies189 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 22,738 Senior Member
    I stopped for a Sonic iced tea after my run this morning and immediately felt guilty because there was the big 'ol straw. I didn't have my metal one with me, and I love that nice fat plastic straw in those large Sonic drinks. I do reuse it...... I really do a lot to minimize my footprint, but there isn't much these days that won't make bring on the guilt.
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