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10th Grader Falsely Accused of Cheating

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Replies to: 10th Grader Falsely Accused of Cheating

  • roycroftmomroycroftmom 3421 replies40 threads Senior Member
    There are some parents who obviously believe their child is perfect and anyone trying to curb the kid's conduct for the good of the school (and the kid's character) is in the wrong, and nothing will change their view. Those kids will not have a good adulthood.
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  • roycroftmomroycroftmom 3421 replies40 threads Senior Member
    Jazzymom7, your example actually works against the kid, not the teacher. When caught in the wrong, people try to cover up, whether they are doctors or students, as likely occurred in this case. That is a far cry from claiming the teachers are on some vendetta against the kid, just as the doctors likely didn't intentionally cause a risky mistake because they were on a vendetta against you. In both cases, parties tried to evade responsibility for their actions.
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  • jazzymomof7jazzymomof7 248 replies23 threads Junior Member
    edited February 2019
    @roycroftmom My example was more about whether or not individuals in certain professions are inherently trustworthy. Medical professionals no longer get my blind trust. Neither do I believe teachers deserve blind trust.

    Sometimes students cheat. Sometimes teachers mistakenly believe a student cheated. Were it my kid, I wouldn't assume guilt or innocence. I would want to be present in conversations about the incident, and I'd want to see the evidence.

    If my kid were to come home and say he was in a 3 vs 1 meeting like the one OP described, I would be very disturbed. Regardless of whether or not the student cheated, IMO, the meeting was inappropriate.
    edited February 2019
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  • yourmommayourmomma 1323 replies1 threads Senior Member
    You added in an entire narrative that the OP did not include. The fiction of that is great but just list in order what mom wrote then added in her follow up posts. This might be your experience, your imagination, or even what mom has imagined, but it is not presented in what mom wrote. Again, this is not some Law and Order episode written for entertainment, this is real life. What possible reason for accusing a bright (teacher said "brilliant" according to mom), upstanding student? What is the motive behind such an interrogation? It is nonsense.

    Sure there is some writer's embellishment in my take. But it wasn't a simple "confessed to cheating." The evidence we do have is that they were getting "angry" with his denials. And that they continued to accuse him after his denials. That's how you coerce a confession. Why would they do that? I don't know. But what I do know is that some do. The OP also states that the Principal disagrees with the punishment but the teacher won't "budge." That tells me something. Why won't the teacher budge? Maybe his ego is in the way?

    My kid was accused. I was accused. The same tactics where used 40 years apart. Both cases were BS.
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  • Nocreativity1Nocreativity1 1112 replies55 threads Senior Member
    @jazzymomof7 "My example was more about whether or not individuals in certain professions are inherently trustworthy."

    I trust the student when he said he was unable to explain how his answer was derived and that he cheated. I look at motivations.

    The student had everything to gain by cheating and denying it to his parents who apparently believe him blindly. The teacher and school have nothing to gain by accusing a highly regarded student.
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  • jazzymomof7jazzymomof7 248 replies23 threads Junior Member
    @Nocreativity1 According to the student, he was coerced by 3 adults into making that confession. 2 of the adults did not understand the math involved, and the only adult in the room who did understand the math is a first year teacher who did have something to gain by making sure that once he had gone to such lengths to accuse the student, the student was found guilty and punished.
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  • roycroftmomroycroftmom 3421 replies40 threads Senior Member
    Jazzymomof7, the school likely wanted to find out the truth. Once the parents are involved, and often their lawyers, that is much less likely to happen , as it is in everyone's interest to dig their heels in and not talk to the other side. No, I really don't think a false confession is likely in this case (compared to custodial police cases where the accused may already have a record or other undisclosed felonies to worry about). I'm glad the school had 3 adult witnesses-If they had fewer, parents would be complaining about that too, claiming collusion.
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  • SatchelSFSatchelSF 1372 replies13 threads Senior Member
    edited February 2019
    OP hasn't been back on since yesterday, and will be surprised no doubt to see where this all has gone! Anyway, there are lots of assumptions being made, only some of which seem supported. Here is what caught my eye in the OP's posts:
    The teacher accusing him has only taught for one year, and just got his degree a year prior to that.
    The teacher actually contacted the principal to accuse him of cheating before he even spoke with my son at all.
    This is a very inexperienced teacher, and may already have switched jobs prior to arriving at this school. As to ability, that is an open question. This is a high school, not the NSA or Google, and talented math degree holders have many options.
    [The teacher] said he had "consulted with a colleague" who also said it was impossible from the work on the page to derive those answers.
    This is a red flag to me. Appealing to some unnamed authority figure who was not present at the meeting suggests a lack of confidence or incompetence, combined with a desire to justify actions to the principal, who didn't understand the math:
    Only one person in the room would have any chance of understanding the explanation, and that's the teacher that made the accusation.
    It does not appear likely that the student got the questions wrong, at least to me:
    He was told that he had cheated, because he had the same answer on two problems of the person sitting next to him, basically without the supporting steps outlined thereon.
    It seems the absence of supporting steps underlay the belief that the student cheated, not the identical answers, implying that both students' answers were correct (if both problems were wrong, then there would be no question of cheating, no need to "consult a colleague," etc.) Again, we do not know what sort of questions, but if we are talking simple things like computing the definite integral of a simple function or a simple u-substitution integration - roughly where we might be in BC in Feb - yeah, plenty of kids could do those in their heads with no work.

    Finally, it appears that the principal has some doubts about the teacher too:
    The principal agreed with me that the penalty was far too harsh, and that the situation had not been handled correctly at all. However, the teacher will not budge, even with her intervention, and the principal told me that she recommended I pursue it with the head of the school.
    I have personally seen new and inexperienced teachers get defensive when challenged and dig in their heels. One at my kid's school last year was dismissed mid-semester, and I played some role in having another teacher's policies put under the microscope, which resulted in multiple grade changes for multiple kids. I hope OP comes back and comments further.
    edited February 2019
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  • momofsenior1momofsenior1 8757 replies83 threads Senior Member
    We actually don't know what the teacher did. All we know is what the student, by way of what they told their parent, thinks the teacher did. That's the biggest problem here, we are only hearing one side.

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  • yourmommayourmomma 1323 replies1 threads Senior Member
    2 identical incorrect wrong answers with no work shown...no ability to explain how answer was derived...confession.

    Quack...quack...quack.

    But this is not what happened. Work was shown. It is alleged that the work couldn't lead to the answer. The kid had a hard time explaining himself during interrogation.

    Maybe, just maybe what you do is call little johnny in after class and ask him how he got his answer without any allegation of cheating. Let him explain. If he can fine. If he can't, fine. Now you have some corroborating evidence and you can move on from there.
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  • ordinarylivesordinarylives 3211 replies44 threads Senior Member
    [The teacher] said he had "consulted with a colleague" who also said it was impossible from the work on the page to derive those answers.
    This is a red flag to me. Appealing to some unnamed authority figure who was not present at the meeting suggests a lack of confidence or incompetence, combined with a desire to justify actions to the principal, who didn't understand the math

    And, you see, to me, this suggests due diligence, as in a check to make sure this is probably cheating before I accuse a student.
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  • MaineLonghornMaineLonghorn 39979 replies2197 threads Super Moderator
    MODERATOR'S NOTE: This thread has turned into one big debate with lots of assumptions being made on both sides. I am closing it. The OP can start a new thread to update. @Andromache
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