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Feds uncover admissions test cheating plot

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Replies to: Feds uncover admissions test cheating plot

  • observer12observer12 Registered User Posts: 289 Junior Member
    edited March 17
    @privatebanker "we are mad that some rich people can buy these"

    I'm certainly not "mad" that rich people can buy whatever they want. That's why I suggested that universities just put those seats up for auction so that any rich person with a kid who can meet some baseline score like 1400 or 32 can bid for his child to get a seat. The college gets the same benefit.

    The only thing that bothers me is the idea that it is a charitable donation. If it is really a charitable donation, the donor will give whether or not his child is put in the same pool as other students and admitted if the application and student stand out so much that they get one of the coveted 5% admit seats. If the donor expects his child to be admitted as long as he meets some baseline, it isn't "charitable" anymore, at least in my opinion.

    I am far less cynical about the very rich than a lot of posters here who insist that we need to keep letting big donors children in through the back door because if they were admitted in the same pool as other students and didn't get in because their application did not stand out over other students, those donors would not donate. I believe the ones who are TRULY donating for charitable purposes will continue to donate.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 75,544 Senior Member
    How will those elite colleges continue to give out so much financial aid to those deserving low SES families if the lose their mega donors?

    There really are not that many low SES students in elite private universities to being with. Only 10-22% of undergraduates there are on Pell grants.

    Also, some are the "privileged poor" who managed to get into prep schools on scholarship or top quality public schools, rather than coming from the limited opportunity educational environments that are common in low SES areas.
  • menloparkmommenloparkmom Registered User Posts: 12,826 Senior Member
    Time to move on.

    amen!!!
  • observer12observer12 Registered User Posts: 289 Junior Member
    edited March 17
    @blueskies2day

    I agree with many of your points. This probably would have been a one day story without the Hollywood ties. I'm shocked at how many people were unaware that years before these Hollywood people were caught, the U. Pennsylvania basketball coach got paid by a very rich Florida businessman to designate his 5'8" son as a recruit so he could get into Wharton. That coach -- who left to go to the Celtics -- even passed along the information to another Penn coach still there (who has since left) to make sure that the money paid by the dad in exchange for his son to go to Wharton was received correctly.

    That happened many months ago and almost no one noticed.
  • wyzragamerwyzragamer Registered User Posts: 63 Junior Member
    Is anyone else sick of people who reason that this scandal justifies affirmative action policies? I’ve seen so many articles to that effect recently.

    This ignores the fact that Singer allegedly misrepresented students’ ethnicities. And perhaps even more importantly, a second wrong doesn’t make a right just because it involves a different group.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 75,544 Senior Member
    alh wrote:
    If it hurts your non legacy kid to get denied, imagine how a multi generation legacy feels.

    The elite college legacy is most likely to have other college choices. Non legacies are more likely to be constrained by money or other issues limiting their other college choices. For example, how about a student from a low income family who has DACA status and lives in a state with poor in state public school FA and no provisions for DACA students?
  • gallentjillgallentjill Registered User Posts: 2,403 Senior Member
    edited March 17
    @ucbalumnus
    There really are not that many low SES students in elite private universities to being with. Only 10-22% of undergraduates there are on Pell grants.
    .

    20% pell grants seems pretty good. That means 1 in 5 students are very low income. Pell grant recipients are not the only students who benefit. Lots of families who don't qualify for pell are still only able to attend these schools through their generous FA policies. What percentage of students at Harvard get some form of FA?
    Also, some are the "privileged poor" who managed to get into prep schools on scholarship or top quality public schools, rather than coming from the limited opportunity educational environments that are common in low SES areas.

    What does that matter? These kids managed to find a way to get a decent education. Good for them. The point is that their families would not be able to send them to college without the generosity of donors.
  • privatebankerprivatebanker Registered User Posts: 3,935 Senior Member
    edited March 17
    @observer12 Hey 5 8 players can be good. Spud webb and mugsy Bowes were
    5 4. And they could dunk. Heck Steph Curry is 5 11 and the best player in the NBA. (Don’t believe his stats. I’ve stood next to him).



    We could start a new thread saying the Basketball scholarships are unfair to anyone not really tall. Even if you shoot just as well. That is an unfair advantage you are born with like really rich grandparents. Probably a higher genetic probability of being 6 5+ than the numbers of Uber rich Harvard legacy grandparents.
    :-?
  • observer12observer12 Registered User Posts: 289 Junior Member
    edited March 17
    @lookingforward "Don't assume they don't give from charitable intentions (as well as the need to unload some wealth) or that it's only about quid pro quo. "

    YOU are the one who acts as if it is a quid pro quo, not me.

    I said to put their children in the same pile as all the other applicants and if their kid is admitted, that's great because we all know that the donor wasn't donating with the understanding that his kid would get in.

    I don't see how you can have it both ways. I guess I'm calling the bluff of all the people who say those donations aren't contingent on an admissions advantage for their kid. Since they aren't contingent on that, why would you give that to them if there are more worthy students to choose?
  • ShanFerg3ShanFerg3 Registered User Posts: 217 Junior Member
    @makemesmart
    Rich people don’t get rich in a vacuum, their wealth comes from society.

    So money is just given to rich people from society? I want that. Where can I sign up for that?
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