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Suggestions for best silk or fleece lined thermals for very petite female requested

PepperJoPepperJo 285 replies10 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
Warmth and quality more important than cost. Washer /dryer friendly is important, too.
Thanks!
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Replies to: Suggestions for best silk or fleece lined thermals for very petite female requested

  • chmcnmchmcnm 90 replies1 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    My wife likes SmartWool brand for all-around warmth. I like anything with Polartec for heavy weight warmth. Silk is the best lightweight material. Never anything cotton.
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  • HImomHImom 34200 replies391 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited July 16
    If you live near any outdoor gear stores, I'd start there. Talk with them about the qualities you want--wash/dry in dryer, etc., plus the weight you want (what temp range). They should be able to guide you. We got some very lightweight thermals that are like VERY THIN fitted sweatpants/tights. They don't show under your fitted slacks but do keep the chill off. I also have some smartwool and some other brands. The stores will also know what brands tend to fit petite females. Good luck & post what you learn (we have a petite D as well--5'2" & under 100 pounds).

    Wev'e found things for D at LLBean, REI, Patagonia, and a few other places. It may be more expensive but it does fit, which provides more warmth and stylishness than things that just hang on her.
    edited July 16
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  • thumper1thumper1 74304 replies3251 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    @PepperJo what will these undergarments be used for?
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  • SybyllaSybylla 3705 replies47 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Look at children's sizes too. IMO silk or wool isn't going to be dryer friendly. Costco used to carry Paradox in the snow belt and that was a nice base layer, had children's sizes too. Not pure anything, a bit of Merino. wash and dry friendly. I used to buy it up on sale.
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  • PepperJoPepperJo 285 replies10 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    @thumper1
    D’s preparing for cold Chicago winters. Looking to wear under jeans and sweaters without adding bulk.
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  • HImomHImom 34200 replies391 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Uniqlo also has generally smaller sizing, as it's made with Asians in mind. My family finds it tends to fit pretty well for more petite folks.
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  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone 22688 replies15 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Land's End or LL Bean. However, anything 'fleece lined' is going to be bulky.
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  • jym626jym626 55331 replies2878 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Merino wool is thin and washable.
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  • pishicacapishicaca 283 replies8 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    For non-fussy, easy to care for and inexpensive base layers, it's difficult to beat https://cuddlduds.com/
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  • cbreezecbreeze 4680 replies88 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Agree with ultimom.
    I am a bicoastal resident from the Bay Area and NY and I save my warm sweaters for the Bay Area because of the warmer, sometimes hot indoor heating in NY. I wear thin thermals in NY and I get them from Patagonia(on sale) and Costco (32 Degrees in child size XL as I am petite as well).
    I do have several very warm and long down coats which I keep permanently in NY. My favorite is the Marmot Women's Montreaux Coat.
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  • showmom858showmom858 2910 replies16 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    My D from the SoCal lived in New York City for 4 years and never wore base layers. She had a really nice long Patagonia down coat that came to her knees and Hunter boots with a warm liner as well as various warm gloves, scarfs and hats and she survived just fine.
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  • thumper1thumper1 74304 replies3251 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    We live where it is cold. Layers work better than undergarments...because as noted above....temps in rooms can really vary. It can be really hot in one room, then the next room can be really chilly. I would suggest your daughter get some fleece vests, and light weight fleece jackets. Those can be worn over her sweaters or shirts...and under her coat. That way...if she is too warm, she can just take the fleece thin off.

    Plus...when weather is chilly but not cold...she can just wear the fleece garments over her clothes.

    It is really hard to take underwear off if you are too hot!
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  • roycroftmomroycroftmom 2879 replies37 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I lived in Buffalo for years. Seriously, no one wore a base layer unless they were skiing for the day.
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  • PepperJoPepperJo 285 replies10 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    We’ve got the outerwear covered. My <100 pound D always runs cold, so we’re just looking for some layering options without the bulk. Thanks all for some good suggestions.
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  • thumper1thumper1 74304 replies3251 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I hear you...but really...layer on top of her clothes...not underneath. Lots of options.

    For outdoor things like skiing...layer under if she wants to...but not for day to day.

    I have fleece lined leggings...very comfy. I wear them for bike riding when it’s chilly. They would probably work just fine under jeans.

    She could also get flannel or chamois lined jeans...LLBean makes them. The only people I know who own them are 60 years old...or older...🙄
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  • HImomHImom 34200 replies391 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Wool tank tops are very nice for a light layer of warmth and can be worn under nearly everything. I use them constantly when I travel. They help moderate the temperature and because they’re wool, they breathe. Mine are from Icebreaker.
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  • thumper1thumper1 74304 replies3251 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    @PepperJo

    Can your daughter wear wool? I know i can’t!

    Also, if you do get wool, I would suggest something machine washable.
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  • momofsenior1momofsenior1 6989 replies49 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Another vote for not layering underneath but over. She will melt indoors and end up shedding layers in the work bathroom otherwise. Thick socks, warm boots, very long coat, good hat, and gloves.

    When it got super cold last year during the polar vortex, most companies allowed their employees to work from home and many places were closed entirely (including colleges).
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  • Snowball CitySnowball City 1724 replies51 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited July 17
    We live in the vicinity of Frostbite Falls:

    You know your daughter. If she runs cold, she will be cold. My philosophy is that it is best to be prepared when moving to a new climate.

    With the advent of the fashion of leggings, my kids wear older skintight leggings under their jeans. Works just as well as thermals. If she she get hot she can pop into the ladies room, remove them, and stuff them in her backpack. In the fall check Athleta online and see what they are offering. They usually are good with expanded sizing.

    A cami under a shirt can make a difference. I like the suggestion above for Icebreaker products. They are expensive but very good quality.

    If she looks good in a turtleneck, get a couple. it will keep the wind off her neck.

    Cashmere sweaters and cardigans are your new best friend. Light weight and warm and layer well. Send mesh bags for washing in cold on delicate and then she can lay them on the bed to dry.

    Invest in good wool socks such as Smartwool. They come in a huge variety of patterns and thicknesses. Thicker isn't always better because it may make the shoes or boots too tight. I wear them 10 months of the year. No joke.

    Does anyone in your family knit? Pick out washable wool at Micheals and have a bunch of hats made and ready. You can find a simple pattern on the internet. My girls lost the nice store bought hats but wore to death the ones made from home. It offers a tangible connection to someone who loves them.

    Don't buy boots yet. She can see what type is popular on campus or ask older students which brands have worked the best. Make sure they can handle slush and ice and aren't just cute.

    For the worst of the winter she is going to want waterproof insulated mittens. Fabric gloves or leather gloves will work fine until about Thanksgiving.
    edited July 17
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