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Elite Colleges’s Love For Community College Transfer Students

RiversiderRiversider 789 replies90 threadsRegistered User Member
edited July 17 in Parents Forum
It sure helps these students but what’s in it for these colleges? Good students who can’t get into or afford top colleges are more likely to go to other colleges on merit scholarships, not community colleges. They reject far more better applicants and then pick up some transfers who are more than likely needing aid and acclimatizing in university environment on top of that.
edited July 17
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Replies to: Elite Colleges’s Love For Community College Transfer Students

  • cptofthehousecptofthehouse 29248 replies57 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    It’s all about supply and demand. They lose a certain number of students in certain disciplines, they want to fill their seats with some kids proven to do well in college in those fields. They want to keep the graduating class size within certain numbers.

    I also do not think the transfer accept %s are shockingly high
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  • RiversiderRiversider 789 replies90 threadsRegistered User Member
    edited July 17
    That makes sense. It sucks for better students who couldn’t get in and had to go to less selective colleges but helps community college students who would never have qualified on merit as freshman to any good college and obviously fill up college’s empty slots and keep less popular departments going. On paper it can be shown as college’s compassion for less privileged.
    edited July 17
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  • OHMomof2OHMomof2 12735 replies235 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Also, community college students have to transfer to complete a BA. So there isn't any "bad fit, didn't work out with college x" risk to them.

    And it is an effective way to get low income but high achieving kids (or veterans and somewhat older students) .

    Question: Anyone know which elite takes the most transfers (as a % of the class)? I assume one of the UCs, but in the private LAC/U world? Seems with very high retention rates (and in some cases 4 year housing requirement or guarantee) there isn't a lot of room for transfers, at most "elites".
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  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 2043 replies28 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Question: Anyone know which elite takes the most transfers (as a % of the class)?
    Don't know off the top of my head, one would have to check the CDSs. Cornell probably takes the most in absolute numbers, not sure about %.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 77733 replies678 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited July 17
    Regarding the original premise of this thread, not all "elite" colleges emphasize community college transfers. https://www.thecrimson.com/article/2018/2/4/transfer-students/ suggests that Harvard does not (their example transfer students came from USMA, Wake Forest, Georgetown, Oxford, UPenn, even though a community college transfer student, if one existed, would make the story more interesting).
    OHMomof2 wrote:
    And it is an effective way to get low income but high achieving kids (or veterans and somewhat older students) .

    For Stanford and Princeton, non-traditional students seem to be among their targets for transfer student recruitment and admission. Non-traditional students commonly get their start in community college.
    OHMomof2 wrote:
    Question: Anyone know which elite takes the most transfers (as a % of the class)? I assume one of the UCs, but in the private LAC/U world?

    Probably one of USC (probably due to being in California, where it is not hard to get strong students among community college transfer applicants), Cornell (at least for the semi-public contract divisions), and Columbia (General Studies division for what it defines as non-traditional students).
    OHMomof2 wrote:
    Seems with very high retention rates (and in some cases 4 year housing requirement or guarantee) there isn't a lot of room for transfers, at most "elites".

    That assumes that the college's business model plans for equal size frosh/soph/junior/senior classes. Not all colleges' business models are planned that way. The California public universities business models assume high junior level transfer intake (about a third of graduates are supposed to be students who started at community colleges), for example. Cornell's contract colleges and Columbia's General Studies division are probably similar.
    edited July 17
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  • skieuropeskieurope 38873 replies6866 threadsSuper Moderator Super Moderator
    edited July 17
    not all "elite" colleges emphasize community college transfers. https://www.thecrimson.com/article/2018/2/4/transfer-students/ suggests that Harvard does not.
    The data set is also tiny with ~12 transfers per year.
    For Stanford and Princeton, non-traditional students seem to be among their targets for transfer student recruitment and admission.
    Also note that, aside from the low number of transfers (13 in the last cycle), Princeton only recently started accepting transfer applications, having eliminated them in 1990.
    Cornell probably takes the most in absolute numbers,
    Cornell, like the UCs and some others, have articulation agreements to offer guaranteed transfer. The better question, without getting into debate on definitions such as "elite," is which private college has the most transfers without articulation agreements. Obviously one can look at the CDS, but someone perhaps has already pulled the numbers.
    edited July 17
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  • RiversiderRiversider 789 replies90 threadsRegistered User Member
    edited July 17
    Yale and Rice take some CC transfers.
    edited July 17
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 77733 replies678 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited July 17
    Absolute number of new transfers in a recent year:
    USC: 1,448 https://admission.usc.edu/wp-content/uploads/Transfer-Profile-18_19.pdf
    Cornell: 645 http://irp.dpb.cornell.edu/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/CDS_2018-2019_v5.pdf
    Columbia: no CDS or other information published

    For USC, 49% of new transfers came from California community colleges, 30% were scions/legacies, and 28% were first generation to college, but very few were military related (22 veterans, 2 active, 4 reserve or NG, 10 dependent).
    edited July 17
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  • lookingforwardlookingforward 33512 replies363 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Not all transfers get decent aid, if any. Depends on the college.

    Agree with ski that the only real power in applying from a cc is when there's a guaranteed transfer policy in place. Otherwise, it's not as simple as supply and demand. There are still standards and applicants from other 4 year schools. It's not a matter of "sloppy seconds."

    I always saw a GT opportuity as a public service of sorts. Accept the most qualified, let others transfer to to other state schools.
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  • RiversiderRiversider 789 replies90 threadsRegistered User Member
    edited July 18
    @sylvan8798 Any high achiever should be able to get merit or aid at some 4 year college so it’s not a bias, just a fact. However, I understand there are exceptions, personal/family issues and bigger hurdles for many but we are taking about majority here. Majority of CC doesn't qualify for selective colleges.
    edited July 18
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  • bluebayoubluebayou 26691 replies174 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Any high achiever should be able to get merit or aid at some 4 year college so it’s not a bias, just a fact.

    And it's also 'just a fact' that the majority /all? merit colleges do not meet full need. There are few true full rides out there.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 77733 replies678 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    [quote=Riversider]Any high achiever should be able to get merit or aid at some 4 year college so it’s not a bias, just a fact. [/Quote]

    Of course, if enough such high achievers decide that (for example) PVAMU full rides are desirable, PVAMU may stop offering them or make them harder to get to avoid blowing out it's budget (why full rides have become less common than before).
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  • Eeyore123Eeyore123 1383 replies19 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Sometimes even a full COA scholarship isn’t enough. The family is dependent upon them either for income or labor.
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  • lookingforwardlookingforward 33512 replies363 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Whythese threads, in the first place?
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  • ProfessorPlum168ProfessorPlum168 3983 replies86 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited July 18
    I found this thread educational. I didn't realize that Cornell (or Columbia) had so many community college transfers. I always assumed transfers into elite private schools were like once in a blue moon.
    edited July 18
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 77733 replies678 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I always assumed transfers into elite private schools were like once in a blue moon.

    For some such colleges, like HYPS, the yearly transfer intake is a few dozen at most. But USC, Cornell, and Columbia have different business models.
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  • garlandgarland 15983 replies198 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Columbia's transfers are generally to the College of General Studies, which is an entirely different admittance structure from the other two colleges, Columbia College and Columbia SEAS. It is specifically set up for nontraditional students, which is a very cool thing. So it really can't be compared to regular admission stats for other Ivies (more similar to Harvard Extension, though my impression is more assimilated into regular CU class structure than HE is, though I could be wrong.) CGS also doesn't offer the same financial aid structure as the two other UG colleges of Columbia. CC and SEAS have very few transfers, as retention is very high.

    Offering this information without judgment, but just to clarify this.
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