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MFA program

ThevintageratThevintagerat 0 replies1 threadsRegistered User New Member
So I'm new to this, I'm hoping someone can help! I am graduating in the spring and my undergrad will finally come to a close. I'm a painting major and I had a dream of getting my masters, then pursuing a university teaching job. Sadly life has been no stranger to me, getting in the way, along with my own choices, that have left my overall GPA at a 2.2. Most professors have told me not to worry, that " they'll look at my portfolio, they'll consider me off of that more than my GPA". I'm sure that's true and part of me thinks that I shouldn't worry too much because my portfolio shows a much better version of myself, the person my GPA cant. However, I can't help but worry. Does anyone know any information that could help me, ease my mind? any schools that with a great portfolio I could stand a chance at? or just any advice at all.
edited July 29
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Replies to: MFA program

  • JBStillFlyingJBStillFlying 6747 replies23 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited July 29
    What type of degree are you expected to get in the spring - a BFA or BA or BS or ?? Are you at a dedicated college of art and design, a university, a liberal arts college? what portion of your education was in your major vs. gen eds and non-studio electives?

    There's more to your transcript than just your GPA. A lot will depend on which classes you excelled at and which you didn't. A C in Calculus might not keep you out of a good MFA program - different story w/r/t a C in Painting Studio.

    Who would be your recommenders? How well known are they for placing students in MFA programs? How do you think you will do on the GRE (typically required but check your schools of interest to make sure) compared to other applicants? These are areas where you have some control.

    Not sure about painting specifically, but was under the impression that many MFA candidates were older and had been out in the word for a bit after college. In that case, much of their portfolio would come from that experience. One nice thing about making a name in the professional world is that it might lead to a contractual position with a local art college or similar even without the MFA. A tenured position is very hard to achieve; an adjunct position less so (most art colleges consist of adjunct faculty). The MFA will help with both, of course, but typically MFA-degreed instructors (whether adjunct or tenure-track) also have studio experience somewhere (which makes sense, given that the both the MFA and BFA are professional degrees). Most likely you'll need substantial studio experience in order to be considered for an academic appointment.
    edited July 29
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