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The Weight of Ink - August CC Book Club Selection

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Replies to: The Weight of Ink - August CC Book Club Selection

  • bookwormbookworm 8806 replies72 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    I finally finished reading this book. I’ve been enjoying the comments, but didn’t have anything intelligent to add. The writing is lovely.
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  • CBBBlinkerCBBBlinker 3421 replies35 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Just thought of another question ...... Ester went to Alvaro's father to offer him the plan that she marry Alvaro. But wasn't Alvaro presumed dead at sea? How did Ester know he was still alive? Did I miss that?

    PS Is there a way to save a draft of your comment before posting it, as there was previously on CC?
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  • Mary13Mary13 3955 replies82 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    The reader only knows that Alvaro’s ship sunk because of the research done by Aaron and Helen. My understanding is that during the time period of Ester’s story, the ship hadn’t sunk yet — that would happen a few months after Alvaro’s return. I don’t have the book with me, but that’s my recollection.

    @CBBBlinker, in the new format, the draft saves automatically (but I’ve found that you have to give it a minute; if I close out too quickly, it’s gone).
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  • Mary13Mary13 3955 replies82 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    We all know that our phones spy on us and then take appropriate action, but I wish mine had made its move a little more quickly: Today’s Amazon Kindle Deal of the Day is The Weight of Ink. Only $2.99!

    https://www.amazon.com/Weight-Ink-Rachel-Kadish-ebook/dp/B01I4FPLUG/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?keywords=the+weight+of+ink&qid=1565534129&s=gateway&smid=A1KUURLZXZKET0&sr=8-1
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  • SouthJerseyChessMomSouthJerseyChessMom 3845 replies15 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Super I am buying it now, thanks mary13 for sharing from the woods in Wisconsin 😛 baby left today ....time to read
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  • CBBBlinkerCBBBlinker 3421 replies35 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @Mary13 I bought my Kindle copy of "The Weight of Ink" a while ago when it was previously on sale. My good luck that we then chose to read it!
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  • Singersmom07Singersmom07 4111 replies80 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    I go t about 3/4 through before book had ot go back to library. Picked up the kindle sale today. Glad I can now finish.
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  • HImomHImom 34089 replies389 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    My library was able to let me renew the book twice, so I can still have it through the discussion.

    Agree that at the time it was proposed that Ester marry Alvaro and care for the elder HaLevy, there was no info about the ship Alvaro was on supposedly sinking—that was research done by Helen and Aaron centuries later.

    I thought Ester showed great resourcefulness in coming up with that plan to save and improve so many lives—her own, Alvaro’s, Rivka’s, and Mr HaLevy.

    It was also kind of Ester not to show Alvaro that his brother’s name was written as the groom by his father and for not to make a fuss.

    The book sure made me glad I wasn’t alive during the time periods covered.
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  • Mary13Mary13 3955 replies82 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    HImom wrote:
    The book sure made me glad I wasn’t alive during the time periods covered.

    Wow, me too. If I traveled back in time, I’d be dead in a week from either pestilence or food poisoning—or maybe just the godawful smell.

    We can start thinking about October’s book at any time. However, we’re also still here for @jollymama, @Singersmom07, or anyone else who is still reading The Weight of Ink. Would love to hear from you after you’ve finished!
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  • HImomHImom 34089 replies389 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    I would likely have died from the allergens that abounded, very little medical care, poor sanitation, not being able to keep my mouth shut and more.

    People lived tough lives. I feel very fortunate to be around at this point in history, where women have many more options. Men also have more options now.
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  • ignatiusignatius 3376 replies21 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Previously mentioned:
    Daisy Jones and the Six

    The House of Broken Angels

    Killers of the Flower Moon
    (nonfiction)

    Educated (nonfiction) paired with Cheaper by the Dozen - I still want to read this but the waiting list (92+) at my library is daunting. I don't want to buy it because it doesn't sound like something I'd reading more than once.

    New suggestions:
    Golden Hill: a novel of old New York

    Calvin
    - by Martine Leavitt paired with Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson (any of the various Calvin and Hobbes books). A friend recommended the book and since I'm a Calvin and Hobbes fan, I thought I'd throw the suggestion out for consideration. The book falls in the YA genre - topic serious enough (schizophrenia) - length under 200 pages (for those who are busy resettling their own YA back to school) and hey Calvin and Hobbes.
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  • Mary13Mary13 3955 replies82 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Daisy Jones and the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid

    The House of Broken Angels by Luis Alberto Urrea

    Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann (nonfiction)

    Educated by Tara Westover paired with Cheaper by the Dozen by Frank B. Gilbreth and Ernestine Gilbreth Carey (both memoirs)

    Golden Hill: a novel of old New York by Francis Spufford

    Calvin by Martine Leavitt paired with Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson (any of the various Calvin and Hobbes books).

    Any others to add? Do we want to throw some NYT bestsellers into the mix? Or a beloved classic? What are you all in the mood for? I thought The Weight of Ink was rich with material for discussion, but it seemed to have only niche appeal--a fabulous niche, but still. :smile:
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  • bookwormbookworm 8806 replies72 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    I learned a lot from Killers of the Flower Moon.
    Most everyone in my bookclub enjoyed Educated. Quite a contrast to Cheaper by the Dozen.
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  • VeryHappyVeryHappy 18409 replies324 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    I'm not suggesting any particular book, but I loved The Weight of Ink, A Gentleman in Moscow, and The Dry. If there's a common theme there, let's go with that! As I've mentioned before, I'm not a fan of science fiction or fantasy. Even Once Upon a River was too fantastic for me.
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  • silverladysilverlady 762 replies19 postsRegistered User Member
    My suggestion would be "Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine". It is a great book.

    I would not choose anything on the current best seller lists. I purchase books that I will ultimately give to our library. (The library gets between $800 and $1500 for new acquisitions a year.) I don't really want to pay full price for a book, if I don't have to. Also, anything too new is hard for people who are on the library wait lists. They can be quite long.
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  • SouthJerseyChessMomSouthJerseyChessMom 3845 replies15 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 13
    House of broken angels sounded like such a sad book, apparently, just the opposite.

    “The setup may sound like a tearjerker, but the book's spirit is irrepressibly high. Even in its saddest moments, The House of Broken Angels hums with joy. Big Angel spends much of the book listing what he's grateful for: family, marriage, working, oysters, being taller than my kids. “

    “Everyone is grieving, Big Angel most of all, and yet this is not a novel about grief. It's a novel about how amazing it is to have been alive.”

    https://www.npr.org/2018/03/07/590072624/despite-a-sad-setup-house-of-broken-angels-hums-with-joy

    In this “raucous, moving, and necessary” (San Francisco Chronicle) story by a Pulitzer Prize finalist, the De La Cruzes, a family on the Mexican-American border, celebrate two of their most beloved relatives during a joyous and bittersweet weekend.

    National Bestseller and National Book Critics Circle Award finalist

    A New York Times Notable Book / One of the Best Books of the Year from National Public Radio, American Library Association, San Francisco Chronicle, BookPage, Newsday, BuzzFeed, Kirkus Reviews, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Literary Hub
    edited August 13
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  • ignatiusignatius 3376 replies21 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 13
    @SouthJerseyChessMom:: I (re)mentioned House of Broken Angels because September is National Hispanic Heritage Month so I thought it might be apropos.

    @Mary13: Don't you have some suggestions to add?

    @silverlady: I'm glad you suggested a book too.

    FWIW: So far this year, we've read
    *three historical - The Nix, Once Upon a River, and The Weight of Ink
    *a classic - A Room with a View

    I freely admit that The Nix fits in contemporary also but what I seem to remember most are those college years and the Democratic convention. And Once Upon a River has elements of mystery and magical realism also but the time period is the 1800s if I remember correctly - so historical mystery.





    edited August 13
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  • mathmommathmom 32115 replies158 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    I think I was interested in House of Broken Angels before because I've read almost no Hispanic/Latino literature and would be unlikely to pick it up myself.
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  • Mary13Mary13 3955 replies82 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    VeryHappy wrote:
    I'm not suggesting any particular book, but I loved The Weight of Ink, A Gentleman in Moscow, and The Dry. If there's a common theme there, let's go with that!

    I've racked my brain, but the only common denominator is that I loved those books, too!
    ignatius wrote:
    @Mary13: Don't you have some suggestions to add?
    Lol, all I want to do is read Little Women. I can't WAIT for Greta Gerwig's film to come out.

    Here's what we have so far:

    Daisy Jones and the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid

    The House of Broken Angels by Luis Alberto Urrea

    Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann (nonfiction)

    Educated by Tara Westover paired with Cheaper by the Dozen by Frank B. Gilbreth and Ernestine Gilbreth Carey (both memoirs)

    Golden Hill: a novel of old New York by Francis Spufford

    Calvin by Martine Leavitt paired with Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson (any of the various Calvin and Hobbes books).

    Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman
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