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How Do Admission Officials View Online High School Classes?

CCEdit_TorreyCCEdit_Torrey 32 replies308 threads Editor
The Dean advises a parent who is considering moving her daughter from a traditional high school to online courses: https://insights.collegeconfidential.com/how-do-colleges-view-online-classes
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Replies to: How Do Admission Officials View Online High School Classes?

  • JanieWalkerJanieWalker 440 replies16 threads Member
    PA Homeschoolers AP Online classes and CTY online courses are extremely rigorous. I am pretty certain college admissions officers who deal with homeschoolers consider those providers to be of extremely high quality. Ditto for Stanford’s online high school courses and Davidson’s online courses....I’ve a feeling the reputation regarding rigor of online providers varies according to the online institution...just as public school reputation varies according to the public school.
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  • ASKMotherASKMother 214 replies1 threads Junior Member
    Sounds like from the article that Admissions Officers do not look highly upon on-line or virtual school (as they call it in our district). However it seemed to be more of an opinion piece as there was no real data/stats or even interview quotes to back up the theory that on-line classes will hurt your chances of getting into the really competitive schools. Article could have used more actual facts.
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  • lookingforwardlookingforward 34856 replies394 threads Senior Member
    edited October 3
    She was speaking from experience and about one family's choice. And sure, some state programs are strong, but many outside programs are not. This also seems about exclusively homeschooling. Not just some courses.

    The scales aren't tipped against these kids. But the best of them do more with learning than just take classes online. And a good slate of ECs, including with peers.
    edited October 3
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  • JanieWalkerJanieWalker 440 replies16 threads Member
    Agreed, @lookingforward - just like the best public and private school kids have great ECs with peers.

    This article is misleading - again, just as there are subpar public and private schools, there are subpar online schools/classes. And just like there are some outstanding public and private schools...so are there some outstanding online schools. I don’t think, based on the current data, that graduates from Stanford’s OHS or homeschoolers who use primarily PA Homeschoolers for their AP Online classes have any disadvantage when it comes to college admissions.

    I think that college admissions officers know which online courses are worth their salt and which aren’t - just like they know which public and private schools are worth their salt and which aren’t.
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  • BeangoalsBeangoals 42 replies1 threads Junior Member
    It definitely depends on which schools we're talking about. I attended a public online high school (virtual academy) and got into all eleven schools that I applied to. The university I am currently attending is a private tier-one research university with a 15% acceptance rate. I believe that the admissions officials view online students the same way they view students who attended a brick-and-motor school. GPA, SAT, personal statements, and extracurricular activities are the determining factors.
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  • austinmshauriaustinmshauri 9086 replies337 threads Senior Member
    NYS doesn't accept diplomas from online high school programs. Many homeschoolers take classes at their local SUNY. If they take 24 credits spread over specific courses (science, history, English, math, etc) they're granted a high school equivalency certificate. They use that to apply to college. If they can't afford to pay for classes out of pocket they teach the required courses and get a Letter of Substantial Equivalency and use that to apply to college.

    It's important to know what your targets want. We looked at college websites before our eldest started high school to see what they required from homeschoolers. We discovered that many wanted more credits in core courses than our state requires homeschoolers to take. Some were more than students need to get a diploma from the local high school, so it pays to check.
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