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Emory nursing school

murphy1008murphy1008 Registered User Posts: 62 Junior Member
edited January 2014 in Emory University
My D applied to Emory and is interested in nursing. Since it is not direct entry into the nursing school I am wondering if anyone knows how difficult it is for an Emory student to be accepted into the nursing program. All the other schools she applied to was direct entry into the nursing school.
Post edited by murphy1008 on

Replies to: Emory nursing school

  • aigiqinfaigiqinf Registered User Posts: 4,032 Senior Member
    Admission to the nursing school for students at Emory's College of Arts and Sciences and Oxford College is now automatic. You simply need to meet the following requirements:

    Complete the 60-credit hours of prerequisites at Emory or Oxford College
    Earn a “C” or better in the prerequisite courses
    Submit an online application (only the application - no supporting documents are required) by January 15th of the year they wish to begin the nursing program
  • murphy1008murphy1008 Registered User Posts: 62 Junior Member
    aigiqinf - thank you! My D loved Emory and applied RD. She was accepted EA to Villanova, University of Pittsburgh and Case Western Nursing. She is just waiting to hear from NYU and Emory. She was worried about having to apply but it seems it shouldn't be an issue. Again thanks!
  • mgfammgfammgfammgfam Registered User Posts: 60 Junior Member
    Don't come to Emory for nursing. Go to either NYU or Pitt. Nursing is a very piratical major which requires a lot of clinical practices. Georgia's hospitals are not as good as NYC's in general.
  • whenhenwhenhen Registered User Posts: 5,638 Senior Member
    Seriously? What do you base that claim on? Regardless of your opinion of the school (it looks like you're transferring based on your post history), Emory is a medical powerhouse in a major city with an excellent nursing program. People in Atlanta still get sick, they still require treatment. I lived with the child of an Emory nurse, who had nothing but good things to say about Emory's nursing program.
  • bernie12bernie12 Registered User Posts: 5,293 Senior Member
    edited February 2014
    I love that.......Georgia hospitals are not as good as the ones in NYC and therefore you shouldn't want to learn or practice in them as much. Wow! This also explains why many residents are attracted to Grady. That's a very mature insight that takes into account the actual quality of the school which is very strong especially for a private school. "I'm too good to be working in these hospitals!". Lovely. I mean, we're talking UG nursing here for goodness sakes.

    In addition, if I were interested in anything clinical, I would happily work at Emory hospitals, Grady, or many other hospitals in Atlanta. If the pre-meds can learn a lot in these settings and flock here, I'm sure students in the nursing program at Emory and GSU benefit as well.
  • mgfammgfammgfammgfam Registered User Posts: 60 Junior Member
    1. Medical excellence does not equal to nursing excellence. They are so different.
    2. When we evaluate a hospital's good or bad for nursing, we don't use USNEWS, which is all about medicine.
    3. It does not matter if I am transfer student or not, I know this program, and just give my ideas. If the parent wants to know more, please message me.
  • bernie12bernie12 Registered User Posts: 5,293 Senior Member
    Uhmmm, who said that we used USNews? It just appears that Emory's nursing school and Georgia State's are doing quite well (I think GSU may be better, but that's expected. It's a public school whose program is probably much larger). I think most nurses are getting sufficient experiences and training in the hospitals or else the enrollment levels at these places would not be doing that well. In addition, it's a nursing school. Nobody says that you need to stay in Atlanta aftwards if you don't like the treatment of nurses within the context of these hospitals. The job of the nursing schools are to train you for any situation at any hospital. Whether or not you can see yourself working in Ga. hospitals in the future has little to do with the training provided by the bachelors of nursing program. Again, many prospective medical school residents probably don't necessarily want to stay in the state of their med. school for their residency program, but it's not necessarily because the training they got through experiences in such hospitals was poor, they could prefer a different setting or climate within certain hospitals, but again, this has little to do with the training program itself. I would primarily worry about such things at the Masters of Nursing level. From what I've heard, most people I know associated with the program seem to enjoy and think that it does provide adequate training. But then again, they seem less inclined to claim that the conditions of the hospitals have hindered their success or experiences.
  • mgfammgfammgfammgfam Registered User Posts: 60 Junior Member
    I think most nurses are getting sufficient experiences and training in the hospitals or else the enrollment levels at these places would not be doing that well.

    Not true. Due to shorten period of the nursing program, many nurses could not gain enough clinical experiences by their graduation day. Many nursing students have very few experiences to practice nursing skills before their role transition. Role transition placement is also not optimistic.

    In addition, it's a nursing school. Nobody says that you need to stay in Atlanta aftwards if you don't like the treatment of nurses within the context of these hospitals.

    I am talking about this program, not job placement. This program really does not worth the tuition that nursing students paid.

    The job of the nursing schools are to train you for any situation at any hospital. Whether or not you can see yourself working in Ga. hospitals in the future has little to do with the training provided by the bachelors of nursing program. Again, many prospective medical school residents probably don't necessarily want to stay in the state of their med. school for their residency program, but it's not necessarily because the training they got through experiences in such hospitals was poor, they could prefer a different setting or climate within certain hospitals, but again, this has little to do with the training program itself. I would primarily worry about such things at the Masters of Nursing level. From what I've heard, most people I know associated with the program seem to enjoy and think that it does provide adequate training. But then again, they seem less inclined to claim that the conditions of the hospitals have hindered their success or experiences.

    Again, please do not compare medical students and nursing students. There are huge differences between those two types of system. Residency program is not even required for nursing student. For nursing student, the experiences they gain in school and hospital prior to graduation are way more important than you think.

    In summary, I am discussing this program only, not the nursing school or this university. I appreciate and respect this university and many faculties in NHW; however, it just is something wrong with this BSN program. I do not know if many BSN students enjoy this program or not, but from what I know, many BSN students would like to seek their MSN in another school, even though they have priority to get in NHW.
  • aigiqinfaigiqinf Registered User Posts: 4,032 Senior Member
    It just appears that Emory's nursing school and Georgia State's are doing quite well (I think GSU may be better, but that's expected. It's a public school whose program is probably much larger).

    Well, with US News, Emory #21 is ranked and Georgia state is ranked #79.

    Emory's nursing school is small and well-funded. It's a good place to go, particularly given that Emory Healthcare is the largest healthcare provider in the state of Georgia. Also, admission is guaranteed to students who attend Emory College or Oxford College and complete the prerequisite courses with a 2.0 or better.
  • bernie12bernie12 Registered User Posts: 5,293 Senior Member
    edited February 2014
    Maybe I have on my Georgia blinders where people tend to talk about GSU's nursing program as if it is the most highly regarded.

    For one, nurses don't do residency, but they obviously must get hands on experience (in which case, much more will come in the MSN programs). And secondly, If I did a BSN program, I would not return for the MSN unless it was free. I would seek a new experience just because (like I'm aiming for a Ph.D in mol. biol and did not bother applying to Emory), so I don't know if that's a good measure. However, I would agree with the notion that the price of the program makes it not as worth it. However, I can pretty much say that about any program at selective private schools that charge 55-60k. It's (the undergraduate education aspect) really only truly worth it if you have significant grants and scholarships to reduce that total cost, which many do. However, full pay, hell no. I don't really even think the BBA program is worth as much as Emory charges despite the job outlooks. No one can truly claim that the BBA training is particularly special or rigorous, only that it does what it's supposed to do...land students a decently paying job after graduating (regardless of their level of training). It's more of a branding, networking, and career services thing than it is about training. With all of this said, I still can't see the nursing par being anymore underwhelming than other programs at such an expensive university. Such is the state of undergraduate education today that I would agree that those without good fin. aid should find cheaper schools that can give a similar (or better) experience, The one thing that you can say about professional training is that it is often kind of standard (especially UG prof. programs), so there shouldn't be some giant advantage of attending Emory or other selective universities with them unless you really want the brand or you see other things at the institution that can enhance your experience. For example, a person that isn't solely focused on nursing, but is also focused on other aspects of healthcare and would like to engage themselves in those as well, may get something close to their money's worth by coming to Emory. If it's just nursing and then moving on, not so much.
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