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Introducing a New Expert Content Section: Careers!

Computer Engineering job prospects?

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Replies to: Computer Engineering job prospects?

  • kkuo12887kkuo12887 Registered User Posts: 117 Junior Member
    You don't know what you're talking about. The cleaning staff don't necessarily need clearances. If uncleared persons were cleaning secure areas, they would be under close supervision by cleared personnel. No, a TS clearance and a technical background does not mean you will automatically make six figures.
    Actually, you're wrong. They would need a TS clearance. You've obviously never stepped foot into a secure area like a TOC. Leave the facts to people who have been there done that. You'll be much better off.
    I suspect that the majority of people with clearances are military people. But that's not what this conversation is about. We are talking about technical workers (e.g. engineers, scientists) with clearances, and only a minority of them have served in the military.
    Many of those engineers/scientists are reservists filling an MOS or CMF that has a high probability of requiring a TS clearance.
    I would take kkuo's comments with more than a grain of salt. 1 to 2 million dollars to sponsor a single TS clearance? Haha. You don't honestly think government contracts are THAT lucrative, do you? There would be no way that any defense contractor would sponsor any employee's clearance if it cost that much. At least wait until you graduate from college and start making the big bucks at your favorite defense contractor before you start giving people advice.
    I'm laughing so hard at you because you have no idea what you're talking about!
    Secret clearances are cheap. Top secret clearances are incredibly expensive. Do you actually know what a background investigation for a TS clearance involves? OPM sends investigators to your elementary school, middle school, high school, every single employer you list, your neighbors, etc. The entire process will likely take a calendar year to adjudicate. They cross check everything, dot all the Is cross all the Ts. That process is lengthy, meticulous, and more importantly expensive.
    As for a defense contractor sponsoring an employee's clearance, re-read what I posted. You have to have an understanding of how funding is allocated in government.
    Also, it would be close to impossible to be a commissioned officer in the military without having graduated from college. Re-read my 1st post in this thread.


    The moral of the story for you is that you need to do less talking and more reading. You have a great day bud.
  • aegrisomniaaegrisomnia Registered User Posts: 1,026 Senior Member
    You guys are great.
  • KamelAkbarKamelAkbar Registered User Posts: 500 Member
    By my calculations, it would take (the equivalent of) 40 man hours per week at $4166 PER HOUR for three months straight to make my investigation cost $2mil. I don't know anyone who gets paid that much, especially not government employees. I always heard that clearances cost about $50k on average, but who really knows? The only person I knew who took a year had an illegal alien parent.

    Don't forget that military culture is corporate culture with more bureaucracy, more micro managers, and more 25 year-olds who think they're leaders just because of the insignia on their chest/hat/shoulder.

    ...and toilet cleaners are sometimes uncleared and escorted to the toilets. That's what the red badges and red lights in the hallway are for. Most of them were cleared military kids doing it as a second job, though.
  • kkuo12887kkuo12887 Registered User Posts: 117 Junior Member
    First of all, there are uncleared AND cleared laborers in classified environments. The cleared workers are usually enlisted Army with TS clearances scrubbing toilets as a second job for extra cash. The uncleared workers also occasionally come in and are escorted by MPs. I've seen some places where everyone's cleared and others where almost nobody is. If you've been a secure area like you claim to have been, you would know the red lights that line the hall are there for a reason. The red badges are, too.
    Thank you for your insight. Congrats on being able to experience one facility with "red lights" and "red badges".
    The only person I knew who took a year had an illegal alien parent.
    And that was probably for a Secret clearance, not for a TS clearance. A year or more is the norm for a TS clearance. You're showing a wealth of knowledge on this topic so far. I'm very impressed.
    By my calculations, it would take (the equivalent of) 40 man hours per week at $4166 PER HOUR for three months straight to make my investigation cost $2mil. I don't know anyone who gets paid that much, especially not government employees. I always heard that clearances cost about $50k on average, but who really knows?
    Assumptions are the root of all mistakes. You are assuming that there is no waste at all and no other overhead. Why don't you just go ask Mokonon how long his background investigation lasted compared to how long it should have lasted?
    Don't forget that military culture is corporate culture with more bureaucracy, less proven leaders, and more kids who think they're leaders because of the insignia on their chest/hat/shoulder.
    Less proven leaders. More kids. And you are speaking from personal experience because you served?
    Roger that "KamelAkbar"! I suppose you do not have any sort of bias with the US military's involvement in the Middle East...do you?
  • KamelAkbarKamelAkbar Registered User Posts: 500 Member
    Ah, spoken like a true Army 2LT.
    And that was probably for a Secret clearance, not for a TS clearance. A year or more is the norm for a TS clearance. You're showing a wealth of knowledge on this topic so far. I'm very impressed.

    Thanks for the valuable insight, LT. However, this person is a Persian Farsi linguist with a TS/SCI. My TS took three months.
    And you are speaking from personal experience because you served?

    Yes. But, because I am not totally disregarding OPSEC, I'm not going to get specific here.
    Roger that "KamelAkbar"! I suppose you do not have any sort of bias with the US military's involvement in the Middle East...do you?

    Racist too! You're gonna be a General one day, boy. Unfortunately, you're talking to a white boy from the mid west.
  • kkuo12887kkuo12887 Registered User Posts: 117 Junior Member
    Racist too! You're gonna be a General one day, boy. Unfortunately, you're talking to a white boy from the mid west.
    When someone with the handle "KamelAkbar" has some generalizations of those who serve in uniform, you have to be a bit suspicious, wouldn't you say?
    No one currently serving in the NG or USAR can reasonably expect to make O-7 without being AGR. The real Army sucks. There I said it.
    Yes. But, because I am not totally disregarding OPSEC, I'm not going to get specific here.
    Why don't you elaborate to the point where you are not disregarding OP and PERSEC?
    My TS took three months.
    Which is probably the case because...
    Unfortunately, you're talking to a white boy from the mid west.
    Now how long do you think that would have taken if you had a less than Caucasian name and were not already a US citizen. You might still be waiting for your clearance today!
  • yagottabelieveyagottabelieve Registered User Posts: 549 Member
    yagottabelieve: Are people really being brought in to do comp engineering jobs? With the job prospects the way they are, would employers really be paying and taking the risks to sponsor immigrants for H-1Bs?

    Yes to both. Some employers, such as Cisco and Juniper, are bringing people who do not currently have the legal right to work in the US in, and/or hiring people to work in their offices outside the US. They maintained that despite the lackluster economy and the (relatively) high tech unemployment, they still can't find qualified people, so they outsource, offshore, etc.

    Also, use your favorite search engine to look up information on the "five pound butterfly" to get an idea of the criteria some tech companies list in job postings, and how difficult those criteria are to meet.
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