Welcome to College Confidential!

The leading college-bound community on the web

Sign Up For Free

Join for FREE, and start talking with other members, weighing in on community discussions, and more.

Also, by registering and logging in you'll see fewer ads and pesky welcome messages (like this one!)

As a CC member, you can:

  • Reply to threads, and start your own.
  • Post reviews of your campus visits.
  • Find hundreds of pages of informative articles.
  • Search from over 3 million scholarships.

Getting Accepted does NOT mean that a Merit Scholarship will be forthcoming....

12527293031

Replies to: Getting Accepted does NOT mean that a Merit Scholarship will be forthcoming....

  • mommdcmommdc Registered User Posts: 10,961 Senior Member
    Competitive scholarships are not automatic. Not everyone who meets the required criteria will receive one.
  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Forum Champion Financial Aid, Forum Champion Alabama Posts: 84,712 Forum Champion
    edited December 2016
    @Portercat I have seen several Test Optional schools state on their scholarship pages that test scores must be submitted for merit consideration.

    That said, I've heard of one or two TO schools that don't require scores.


    You are right that the merit and FA processes aren't often transparent. Yes, NPCs are often out of date, using obsolete Costs of Attendance (old Tuition rates, etc), and sometimes even include MERIT awards without asking any stats!!!

    I was very disgusted that one NPC routinely showed full FSEOG grants to Pell recipients, which is very misleading.

    Another mom showed me that several well-known schools' NPCs didn't ask for about assets!
  • CourtneyThurstonCourtneyThurston Registered User Posts: 1,376 Senior Member
    "I have seen several Test Optional schools state on their scholarship pages that test scores must be submitted for merit consideration."

    This is definitely the standard: test optional for admission, NOT test optional for money. This is true at my school and other top schools, including Pitzer et al. I worked with a bright kid with great stats apart from his low ACT. He got into Pitzer but struggled to win institutional scholarships. We spent a lot of time and effort crafting his essay around some amazing things he'd done, and he still got waitlisted for a number of institutional scholarships. Even at test optional schools, even when everything else is perfect, you're unlikely to win merit money without top test scores, too. [He ended up winning Gates so all was well.]
  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Forum Champion Financial Aid, Forum Champion Alabama Posts: 84,712 Forum Champion
    It makes sense that TO schools will require scores for merit because virtually all of their students have high GPAs. TO schools still want to report a high test score range for the upper quartile. Some would argue that by being Test Optional, it allows them to exclude "lesser scores" that might drag down their reported middle quartiles.
  • professordad999professordad999 Registered User Posts: 9 New Member
    We'd give (the directional where I teach, that is) a couple thousand merit in this case - and we don't charge anyone OOS tuition (I'm always asking the admissions people why we don't advertise that much, I suppose, being a branch campus we don't expect a lot of OOS applicants other than sports recruits). This is why I keep pestering my own son (ACT 34, better than 2.8 grades, though) to at least get an application in in time for merit aid (much as living at home seems about two notches above suicide to 1 year olds, I suppose).
  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston Registered User Posts: 15,018 Senior Member
    In this past admission cycle colleges seem to be falling into two groups: under enrolled and overenrolled. In the Boston area Northeastern was overenrolled 308 freshmen, BU overenrolled 90 and BC overenrolled 112, all without going to the waitlist. Some top Midwestern LAC's including Oberlin and Kenyon were also under enrolled. Not to mention many lower tiered colleges that are struggling for students and even survival in some cases.

    Colleges that are overenrolled and in high demand are likely less willing to up the merit ante to get a student to enroll unless the student is one of the topmost applicants. Colleges that are under enrolled may be willing to give a large "merit" award to many if not most accepted students.
Sign In or Register to comment.