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Dynamics of Grants and Institutional Scholarships?

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Replies to: Dynamics of Grants and Institutional Scholarships?

  • nhskidadnhskidad Registered User Posts: 15 Junior Member
    Not planning on loan for 100% of EFC.

    @alooknac Scholarship details are general in the acceptance packet. Just mentions renewable for 4 years if a full-time student, in good academic standing and make regular progress towards graduation. Will look into the study abroad question.

    @sybbie719 I was thinking the same thing vis-a-vis losing a scholarship at a school that promises to meet 100% family need. Seems like they would be committed to funding either way? Perhaps that is why the others do not do merit aid?

    @mom2collegekids Yes all are CSS profile schools. While FAFSA EFC may be technically meaningless, I assume the results must be similar as they all are offering grants to bring our portion down to the EFC level. Right?
  • intparentintparent Registered User Posts: 33,508 Senior Member
    Run the net price calculator for all with 2 kids. Your costs may go down with 2 — but Oberlin won’t increase their merit (although you could get some need based aid). In that case, it might be cheaper to pick one of the need based schools.
  • nhskidadnhskidad Registered User Posts: 15 Junior Member
    Interesting info from Wesleyan. Fin. Aid.

    If the second child is at an institution with comparable tuition/fees they continue to meet 100% of need but build the award with the assumption of 60% of the EFC allocated to Wes.
  • thumper1thumper1 Registered User Posts: 69,483 Senior Member
    If the second child is at an institution with comparable tuition/fees they continue to meet 100% of need but build the award with the assumption of 60% of the EFC allocated to Wes.

    @nhskidad most Profile schools do the same...when two kids are in college...it’s not a 50/50 split of the family contribution. It’s 60%.
  • nhskidadnhskidad Registered User Posts: 15 Junior Member
    edited April 15
    Posting this here vs new thread as I got lucky with feedback from some of the more experienced folks on CC.

    Part of our final decision (see https://talk.collegeconfidential.com/parents-forum/2074289-may-1-deadline-logistics.html) will also be our understanding/communicating to DD impacts of difference between aid packages.

    Reed
    Sub Loan $0.0
    Un Sub Loan $5.5
    Work Study $1.8

    Wes
    Sub Loan $3.5
    Un Sub Loan $0.0
    Work Study $2.8

    Haverford
    Sub Loan $2.5
    Un Sub Loan $0.0
    Work Study $2.0

    Oberlin
    Sub Loan $3.5
    Un Sub Loan $2.0
    Work Study $2.7

    Net cost is about the same, O is 4k more (we will try to work on that)

    If subsidized loans are awarded based on need, Is there an advantage to choosing a school that seems to value our need higher?

    @thumper1 will love this question... Is there anything "different" about Reed that has 5.5 un-sub and Hav which has 2.5 subsidized, 0 un-sub? I assume it is just the natural outcome of formulas that do not see a need. Which would indicate to me there is an advantage to a school that sees need.

    Any favorite loan calculator out there to illustrate these sorts of things?

    *Actual they included $24 here, not sure what is up with that?!
  • brantlybrantly Registered User Posts: 2,808 Senior Member
    @nhskidad in post #11 you said:
    Grants and merit scholarship are the mechanisms used to do so, a not an indicator of applicant "superpowers".
    No. Merit scholarships have nothing to do with meeting your financial need. Awarding of a merit scholarship is completely outside the financial aid process. However, if your D does have a merit aid award, it reduces your family's financial need.

    Re post #12
    If subsidized loans are awarded based on need, Is there an advantage to choosing a school that seems to value our need higher?
    You are going about this the wrong way. There's no such thing as "valu[ing] your need higher." These are purely financial decisions on the part of the colleges. Each has its own formula for calculating need. Assuming your income and assets remain relatively the same, the financial aid award will remain pretty much the same. Forget about the EFC (which is irrelevant for colleges that use the CSS Profile, anyway). Just look at the bottom-line cost to you -- that's the amount of the check you will have to write to the college. Then calculate what your monthly loan payment will be after graduation. Those are all the numbers you need to know.

    Also, I would consider each of the awards pretty much equivalent. Which college does your D like the best?
  • nhskidadnhskidad Registered User Posts: 15 Junior Member
    Thanks, Brantly.

    Was using the term "value" in this case in a pure accounting sense, that is, if one school's formula seems advantageous to our family, should we consider that is decision making... (knowing of course formula could change year to year).

    Still, need to visit two of the schools which his holding up the "like best" decision. Serenity now!
  • thumper1thumper1 Registered User Posts: 69,483 Senior Member
    @nhskidad

    Your kid can take $5500 in Direct Loans with the max subsidized being $3500.

    So for any of the schools that offered you less than a total of $5500 in Direct Loans...you probably can bump it up to the $5500 with the remainder being unsubsidized (like Oberlin did ).

    Re: Reed. They determined that you didn’t have sufficient need for a subsidized loan at their school.

    At Haverford, you CAN ask for the additional $3000 in student loans...but they will be unsubsidized.

    The only caveat...the schools can’t award you need based aid that will exceed the cost of attendance. BUT you can take the Direct Loan to pay the remainder of your family contribution.
  • brantlybrantly Registered User Posts: 2,808 Senior Member
    So, to you, "value your need higher" just means "gives you more financial aid." But the difference in offers is almost immaterial. They are close enough that you can put the financial piece aside and let your daughter decide which school she wants to attend. You also need to decide whether travel costs are a consideration for your family. These schools are in different parts of the country, so I assume some of them would involve more travel costs than others.

    At this point I think you are focusing on the wrong thing. It's not like one school is a full ride and another offers nothing. You are splitting hairs.
  • alooknacalooknac Registered User Posts: 1,237 Senior Member
    There is a difference between sub & unsub loans. If it were my family, I would run some student loan calculators to see the $$ difference. No interest accrues on unsub loans till 6 months after grad. Not positive about other differences, just a piece of the puzzle to evaluate.
  • nhskidadnhskidad Registered User Posts: 15 Junior Member
    > At this point I think you are focusing on the wrong thing. It's not like one school is a full ride and another offers nothing. You are splitting hairs.

    Coming to that conclusion, slowly...., alas there is no secret to be found

    But I will take @aloonknac advice and find some calculators :-)
  • brantlybrantly Registered User Posts: 2,808 Senior Member
    edited April 17
    @nhskidad Yes, see what the loan payments will be after graduation. If the differences are meaningful to you, then by all means use that as a guide. It could be a $25-$75/month difference or something like that (just pulling that out of my head) due to the difference balances of unsubsidized vs. subsidized loans. Maybe if your daughter has a strong preference for the college that's giving less in subsidized loans you can ask her to pay that monthly difference.
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