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A university denied my scholarship after having paid the confirmation fee in time.

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Replies to: A university denied my scholarship after having paid the confirmation fee in time.

  • calmomcalmom Registered User Posts: 19,920 Senior Member
    The problem is that these students from Nepal are in no position to pay $10K for room and board -- and of course as international students would not be eligible for federal loans or federally-funded work-study.

    Essentially these students were lured in by a false promise -- maybe most wouldn't have better options in any case, given that there isn't all that much scholarship or need-based aid available for internationals at US colleges overall. But at least some would have cast a wider net.

    And it makes no sense that any college wouldn't be tracking its financial aid offers at the time they were being made. UT Tyler could have projected out how many international scholarships it wanted to award. They didn't have to offer a single scholarship beyond their budget in the first place.
  • PublisherPublisher Registered User Posts: 4,304 Senior Member
    @calmom: Yes, I understand. Nevertheless, I thought that UT-Tyler's response was worth sharing.
  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 Registered User Posts: 38,202 Senior Member
    edited May 14
    Note that all US students kept their scholarships - UT Tyler knew they'd be sued by US citizens but calculated international students couldn't.
  • CU123CU123 Registered User Posts: 2,699 Senior Member
    Just because they are international doesn't mean they can't sue.
  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone Registered User Posts: 18,871 Senior Member
    UT could have offered alternatives, like deferring for a year, or doing online courses for a year.
  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 Registered User Posts: 38,202 Senior Member
    edited May 14
    Not legally, sure. But imagine you're from a country where average wages are perhaps $150 a month. How do you sue a university 14,000miles away? Also the litigation cukteebs very American. Most people in other cultures don't sue.
  • calmomcalmom Registered User Posts: 19,920 Senior Member
    They can sue but it is probably cost prohibitive on an individual basis. Hard to find a lawyer they can afford to take it on. Though given the fact that the students have organized and assembled records to track the students, plus the high level of publicity --- perhaps there is a Texas lawyer who would be willing to take on the case on pro bono or reduced fee basis.

    The problem is that attorneys generally do not take on contract law suits on a contingency basis --- and generally in a lawsuit on a contract, there is no right for the prevailing party to collect attorney fees absent a specific written contract clause allowing that claim. No punitive damages unless the attorneys can prove a cause of action for fraud as well as breach of contract.

    The other problem is that lawsuits take time-- and these are young adults who want to be starting their educations now. So a lawsuit is unlikely to fix the problem. But yes, especially for the 40+ students still left without a viable alternative -- a lawsuit might be the best option. Not because it would solve their problems now, but the funds from a settlement paid out later might be very helpful to the students and their families.
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 28,641 Senior Member
    Any lawsuit wouldn't be resolved by the start of fall semester, even if you're a US kid, with access to US lawyers.

    What Tyler or the UTsystem could have done is assign a few high staff to try to resolve this by contacting other colleges. Or funded some legit group working toward the goal of settling these kids successfully at other schools. I don't see whether they did this.
  • CTScoutmomCTScoutmom Registered User Posts: 1,802 Senior Member
    The other things they could have done was back the scholarships off in the order they were accepted, rather than targeting everyone from Nepal. Yield is an entirely different concept from scholarships. You offer admission, and only offer scholarships up to the amount available. You then let other students know they are on a waiting list for the scholarship if it becomes available as others decline the offer. I would have thought that's how the systems works, given their insistence on committing by March 1st. In an age when other colleges are scaling back their merit scholarships, I have to wonder what they were thinking. They wanted to entice more applicants, but their plan worked a bit too well, and they didn't think to track the number of offers being made. Head should roll!
  • calmomcalmom Registered User Posts: 19,920 Senior Member
    Actually, I think that colleges do typically offer more merit money than they expect to actually pay out, precisely becaue for US students merit money is used as an enticement to attract high performing student who are likely to be cross admitted to more prestigious, higher ranked colleges --- so every year we see threads in April from students/parents weighing the choice of full pay at an Ivy vs. full ride scholarship at Less Impressive U. And American students who have no money for colleges but have the stats to qualify for generous scholarship money also would be eligible for generous need based aid from other schools -- so the US student offered the Presidential scholarship will either have enough financial resources to be able to also consider more desirable schools, or alternatively may be weighing the merit award against generous need based aid from other colleges.

    But obviously the situation changes when the aid is offered to international students unlikely to have other competitive options to consider. So I agree, for that pool of student, they should have tracked offers and once their limit was reached, admitted other students but waitlisted them for the scholarships money. Then the March 1 deadline would have made sense as a way of freeing up funds that could have then been offered to other students.
  • OHMomof2OHMomof2 Registered User Posts: 11,737 Senior Member
    edited May 15
    UT could have offered alternatives, like deferring for a year

    An excellent option. Disappointing still, but better than the basically nothing they did offer. And it seems workable - they did honor some 100 of these, why not defer the 65 or whatever to next year?
    What Tyler or the UT system could have done is assign a few high staff to try to resolve this by contacting other colleges. Or funded some legit group working toward the goal of settling these kids successfully at other schools. I don't see whether they did this.

    According to everything I've read these kids are being helped by volunteer counselors NOT from UT-T, and misc people who read about it and reached out, and each other. UT-T hasn't done anything but offer the much lower scholarships.

    Looks like the UT system as a whole just wants it to go away and has offered ho help at all to Tyler or to the students.
    You offer admission, and only offer scholarships up to the amount available. You then let other students know they are on a waiting list for the scholarship if it becomes available as others decline the offer.

    Logical, and totally workable given that they're already engaging in the ethically dubious (I'm being generous) practice of requiring acceptance and deposit before May 1.
  • OHMomof2OHMomof2 Registered User Posts: 11,737 Senior Member
    Another article -

    https://www.texastribune.org/2018/05/12/university-texas-system-ut-campus-and-17-million-broken-promise-admitt/ which recaps the lame excuses from the UT system (whose chancellor is retiring at the end of this month and had ho higher ed experience prior to coming on).

    And https://www.texastribune.org/2017/08/21/ut-system-oil-money-gusher-its-administration-and-trickle-students/ is about the 20 billion in oil money the system has, and how little it spends on financial aid.
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