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How does one go about getting a full ride to an out-of-state university?

KareeAKareeA Registered User Posts: 6 New Member
I have no clue how or why colleges give free rides to High school students. I would like the chance to earn a half or full ride to an out-of-state university, but I don't know what I have to do to increase my chances. I have a 3.8 GPA, 25 college credits so far (possibly A.A by the time I graduate in May 2019), 9 AP classes (5 completed AP classes so far, 3 As and 2 Bs), +100 community service hours, and 10% of my class. I'm not a valedictorian, but I do feel like I'm a very hardworking and dedicated student. Based on the information, what would my chances to get a full ride be and what should I do to increase my chances?

P.S. I'm asking this question in particular towards North Carolina State and Campbell University.
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Replies to: How does one go about getting a full ride to an out-of-state university?

  • allyphoeallyphoe Registered User Posts: 1,561 Senior Member
    NCSU: https://park.ncsu.edu/about/

    Campbell's Presidential is about half tuition, so not close to a full ride.
  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Forum Champion Financial Aid, Forum Champion Alabama Posts: 83,895 Forum Champion
    What are your test scores
  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston Registered User Posts: 14,007 Senior Member
    Chances of getting a full ride (tuition, room and board) scholarship are virtually zero. The only possible way is if you are VERY low income and accepted to a college that meets full need.
  • CU123CU123 Registered User Posts: 2,695 Senior Member
    Full tuition - maybe (with some very good scores), full ride - no
  • thumper1thumper1 Registered User Posts: 70,976 Senior Member
    You wrote this today...
    For my March SAT I got a 1220. 670 in RW and 550 in Math. Would this be considered a good score? My next SAT is scheduled for August 25th. What ways can I improve my score? Specific advice on studying? I'm aiming for anywhere between 1,300-1,360. Is that range a good SAT goal?

    I can’t think of any college where you will get a guaranteed full ride with your current SAT score...or even a 1360.

    And that SAT score would not be a slam dunk for admission to schools where full need is met for all. Also...we don’t even know if you have financial need.

    Why OOS...why?

    What are your instate options?
  • lyndonwslyndonws Registered User Posts: 15 Junior Member
    Fill that FAFSA with schools that offer high merit scholarships (up to 10). Have to see where the cards fall ...
  • Erin's DadErin's Dad Super Moderator Posts: 35,727 Super Moderator
    ^ Make sure you have a safety you can afford and would be happy to attend. Depending on your finances and your state, that may very well be your local CC.
  • Twoin18Twoin18 Registered User Posts: 733 Member
    "Chances of getting a full ride (tuition, room and board) scholarship are virtually zero. The only possible way is if you are VERY low income and accepted to a college that meets full need."

    To be specific, the chances are virtually zero *with your current academic profile*. These scholarships exist but are very competitive. To be a contender you'd need a profile approximating 4.0UW (in a most rigorous course schedule) and 1550+ SAT/35+ ACT and in the top 1-2% of your class, plus something else in terms of leadership/high level EC achievements. If you were competitive for an Ivy League school then you would have a decent probability of receiving a full tuition scholarship somewhere and would have a chance of being competitive (though with no guarantee) for a full ride scholarship at those universities that offer them. Remember that (ignoring athletic scholarships) there are far fewer full rides in the US than there are high school valedictorians.
  • CU123CU123 Registered User Posts: 2,695 Senior Member
    .....and that somewhere will be a very middle of the road or lower college.
  • Twoin18Twoin18 Registered User Posts: 733 Member
    ...which is the trade-off many people make, money or prestige, especially if the prestige option is unaffordable or barely affordable. But unfortunately not with this level of stats.
  • evergreen5evergreen5 Registered User Posts: 1,045 Senior Member
    edited May 16
    Wyoming would give a scholarship of 9.6k for those stats, but OOS COA is 28k, so there would still be a cost of 17-18k.
    http://www.uwyo.edu/admissions/scholarships/non-residents/rms.html
    http://www.uwyo.edu/admissions/scholarships/cost-of-attendance.html

    (and probably too far away. just throwing it out there.)
  • coolguy40coolguy40 Registered User Posts: 1,604 Senior Member
    Check out Alabama, Auburn, and Mississippi State.
  • lvvcsflvvcsf Registered User Posts: 2,161 Senior Member
    There are places you might get full tuition for your stats. I am not sure what the SAT to ACT conversion is but the University of Southern Mississippi offers full tuition for those with a GPA of 3.0 and an ACT score of 30. They have other competitive scholarships but those can be well .... competitive. It's actually a beautiful campus. Full tuition, room and board can be difficult to find even for those with excellent scores. It's actually a pretty inexpensive place to go OOS to begin with. The total COA for OOS is less than $26k.
  • thumper1thumper1 Registered User Posts: 70,976 Senior Member
    @KareeA

    For all we know...the colleges being suggested here are instate.

    It’s not easy getting a full complete free merit ride anywhere. It’s even more challenging when you are not a state resident.

  • Twoin18Twoin18 Registered User Posts: 733 Member
    "It’s not easy getting a full complete free merit ride anywhere. It’s even more challenging when you are not a state resident."

    Is the second part of this statement true for full ride merit only scholarships? It may be correct for many need based scholarships especially those that are given to local kids, but most if not all of the competitive full ride merit scholarships that I'm aware of are not restricted to instate students. Its also far from clear that there is a bias towards instate students, when the mix of instate vs out of state recipients usually has more OOS kids than the college as a whole.
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