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NCP Doesn't Pay Court-Ordered Child Support - Zero Contract

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Replies to: NCP Doesn't Pay Court-Ordered Child Support - Zero Contract

  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone 24783 replies20 threads Senior Member
    In many cases, the NPC assumes two married parents...not a single parent.

    I can't remember a single NPC that didn't ask marital status, and all seemed to have the options of single (never married), divorced, widowed, married. Some things don't matter, like if you are looking for the simplified assets test, the under $50k is for the return, and it doesn't matter if it is for one parent, for two parents with both working, for one parent working but filing the return as married - it's under $50k. Having two parents gets an extra 'family member' for the count.

    I think there are NCP who do not pay their required child support but a waiver would not be granted because the NCP does have contact or there is a way to contact that parent. My brother had a lot of contact but paid no child support.

    Every school is going to have its own standards for granting the NCP waiver. Some might want proof that the CP/student made an attempt to contact the missing parent while others may have a period of time required for not seeing the NCP before granting a waiver (5 years? 10 years?). Discuss it with the schools.

    I don't see how a school like Alabama or UK would be a better choice for a florida resident than a Florida school on Bright Futures. If you want no loans, no gaps, the way to go is Bright Future/ Benacquisto full ride.

    Only you can decide if it is worth it to take loans or work in order to go out of state and avoid a Florida school.
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  • CCtoAlaskaCCtoAlaska 579 replies4 threads Member
  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Forum Champion Financial Aid, Forum Champion Alabama 84339 replies1049 threads Forum Champion
    Some colleges' NPCs do ask if the parents are divorced, and provide spaces to fill in NCP income and assets if they are.

    Interesting

    Which ones?
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 83388 replies741 threads Senior Member
    edited December 2018
    Re:#23

    Princeton and any school using the College Board template and requiring NCP information.
    edited December 2018
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  • TrendaLeighTrendaLeigh 202 replies25 threads Junior Member
    I learned a bit more about the NCPs situation last night after talking to his brother. His brother, who is a responsible, reliable individual, indicated that he is sure the NCP (his brother) would NOT complete the FAFSA. He has lots of issues with back taxes, court cases, etc., although his "above the table" income is low. The brother also reminded me that the NCP has assets of at least $350,000 from the 1/3 of the house he inherited with his parents. The brother thought maybe the fact that it was in a trust might make a difference...?? There are also numerous court cases, law suits, etc. swirling around him. He also has several domestic disturbance calls, etc., although I'm not sure there if he was arrested. (I mention this because he's not the type of person you want to push - I've opted not to aggressively pursue child support because we live a sane, drama-free life, and I want to keep it that way.) It's a cluster.

    We actually don't know where he's currently living and have had no contact with him for years - but I could not truthfully tell the schools we couldn't find him.

    I realize every college is different, but does anyone have stats on the percentages of waiver requests that are granted? Or personal experience when the NCP does not have contact with the children and does not pay court-ordered child support?

    She has several great safety and match options in Florida, but wants to at least explore other options, knowing they have to work financially. If the chance of a waiver being granted is small, though, we'll likely limit our search to schools that don't require NCP info.

    @ucbalumnus and @thumper1, thanks for the list of CSS schools with NCP info.
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  • thumper1thumper1 78283 replies3528 threads Senior Member
    I learned a bit more about the NCPs situation last night after talking to his brother. His brother, who is a responsible, reliable individual, indicated that he is sure the NCP (his brother) would NOT complete the FAFSA

    I’m guessing this is a typo. Non-custodial parents do NOT ever complete the FAFSA, and their income and assets are not ON the student FAFSA.

    Non-custodial parents are required to submit the NCP Profile form at some colleges.
    He has lots of issues with back taxes, court cases, etc., although his "above the table" income is low. The brother also reminded me that the NCP has assets of at least $350,000 from the 1/3 of the house he inherited with his parents. The brother thought maybe the fact that it was in a trust might make a difference...?? There are also numerous court cases, law suits, etc. swirling around him

    None of these are the basis for a non-custodial parent waiver, in my opinion. BUT apply for NCP Profile waivers at the colleges that require them...and see what happens. You might get granted these waivers. Check with the schools for what they require to get this waiver...then request.

    But also have some options that do not require the NCP forms on your kid’s application list, as well as places where large merit is also possible as merit won’t be dependent on filing financial aid forms (unless specific awards have a need component).

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  • TrendaLeighTrendaLeigh 202 replies25 threads Junior Member
    @thumper1, yes I meant the CSS. The info about his back taxes and other issues was to explain why he will likely refuse to complete CSS if we can locate him. The focus of our waiver would be that he has had zero contact for years and does not pay even court-ordered support.

    I am trying to get a sense of whether most schools would consider a waiver under these circumstances. I will contact a few of her wish list schools to see if I can get more insight beyond what’s stated on their website.

    We definitely have financial/academic safety schools. In learning more about the process, I am realizing she will likely need to go to an in-state public school, and I know that will be ok. However, because she has done everything she could to have more options, I don’t want to prematurely give up on the financial side until we have thoroughly explored all reasonable avenues.

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  • blossomblossom 10386 replies9 threads Senior Member
    Do you have documentation that your ex has not complied with court-ordered support? Your waiver is MUCH stronger when you've got a "I petitioned the court on XYZ date to garnish his wages" situation vs. "He owes me money" situation.

    I would also get a letter from a clergy person who knows your D (if there is such a person) to attest that she's had no contact with her dad since XYZ date. I think the colleges are leery of the "Her dad is a bum" scenario vs. "After years of a good faith effort to maintain contact with her father and to have him comply with visitation and financial support per the divorce decree, she has effectively been abandoned by him".

    Just a suggestion. A VERY high percentage of divorce situations involve "s/he doesn't want to pay his fair share", which if I read your description with my cynical hat on, is how it reads. Not saying that this is accurate- but it's certainly one way to read it.
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  • TdoesCollegeTdoesCollege 161 replies0 threads Junior Member
    The brother thought maybe the fact that it was in a trust might make a difference...?

    Assets in a trust need to be reported on the FAFSA even if they're not available during the time window of college attendance. This has been an annoyance for me.
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  • lookingforwardlookingforward 35380 replies399 threads Senior Member
    edited February 2019
    The fact he hasn't paid support is one point. The fact there's been no contact in 4-5 years is equally part of it. Not that you "could" find him if you made it a campaign or pressed relatives. You may not want to track him down and establish contact. That could blow the waiver.

    The Fafsa looks at the custodial parent. Not the AWOL parent's possible assets. OP doesn't need to report what her ex-husband has, may have, or what the BIL thinks. They're divorced. Even on the CSS, each parent reports for her/himself, in a divorce. The absent parent would use the NCP form.


    So I agree, contact a few colleges, or otherwise find their NCP waiver form, and see the sorts of questions asked. Some do require back-up letters (GC, social worker, clergy, it depends.) If support stopped and you discussed that with your attorney, maybe that attests. It's not that you had to have filed a lawsuit.

    edited to reflect ex, not "husband."
    edited February 2019
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  • momofmusician17momofmusician17 630 replies54 threads Member
    edited February 2019
    @TrendaLeigh - Be prepared to be able to prove the lack of contact. My daughter's father has had no contact with her since May 2010. Our situation is such that it is very obvious that her father would not be able to contribute. We still had to provide 'proof' that he could not pay. We are not religious people, so a priest/preacher was out. Her HS Counselor started in August of last year and was not aware of the situation. She did end up writing a letter that said that her dad did not appear on any school records. I also had a court order from 2010 showing that the only contact that he could have with her was through letters, and other documentation that I would prefer not to put on an open forum. BTW - It cannot be your own attorney.

    Even in a situation where it is blatantly obvious that there would be no way that the NCP could contribute, we still had to provide multiple pieces of proof.
    edited February 2019
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  • TrendaLeighTrendaLeigh 202 replies25 threads Junior Member
    @blossom - Yes, we have documentation about lack of payment as his wages were originally garnished, and those payments stopped when he moved/quit. I appreciate the advice about watching the tone...it's definitely more than a case of him not paying his fair share. In the last ten years, he's seen them once for about an hour. The only money we ever received was through garnishment - otherwise, no cards, no calls, much less presents.

    @lookingforward, good advice. The waiver form specifically states that "no contact" may be an acceptable reason, but refusal to complete the CSS is explicitly not a reason.

    @momofmusician17, gosh it's hard to prove a negative, isn't it? I have his name on school records, but never his address or phone. I'm confident her school counselor would be happy to help; I think I'll mention it now so there's a history to the conversation. Need to put aside my embarrassment...

    Thank you for sharing your experiences and insight. Much appreciated.

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  • momofmusician17momofmusician17 630 replies54 threads Member
    @TrendaLeigh - Explaining our situation to my daughter's counselor was awful, but necessary. Just remind yourself that you shouldn't be embarrassed. His actions have absolutely nothing to do with you.
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  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone 24783 replies20 threads Senior Member
    In your situation, a letter from his brother might have some weight. The brother could confirm that he's not been around for years, that your children are not included in his family's events and holidays, that he takes steps to avoid you and the children.

    It is really impossible for anyone but the FA officer to know what a school wants for the waiver. Last year there was a poster on CC whose ex did pay court ordered child support, but she still got a waiver at St. Olaf (and I think several other schools). We don't know what her divorced agreement called for but whatever it was, St. Olaf accepted it and granted the NCP waiver.
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  • thumper1thumper1 78283 replies3528 threads Senior Member
    And your kiddo might get the waiver at some schools....but not at others. That happens too.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 83388 replies741 threads Senior Member
    In general, due to the lack of transparency regarding NCP waivers, any college where getting an NCP waiver is necessary for affordability should automatically be put into the "reach" category, even if admission chances are estimated as "match", "likely", or "safety".
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  • thumper1thumper1 78283 replies3528 threads Senior Member
    @TrendaLeigh I noticed you mentioned your multiple 16 year olds on another thread. Do you have twins?

    If you have two kids who will be attending college at the same time...and you are trying the net price calculators (some do account for single parents)....make sure you indicate there will be two in college.
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  • TrendaLeighTrendaLeigh 202 replies25 threads Junior Member
    Yes, they're twins, but she skipped 8th grade, so she''s a year ahead. (He's a sophomore.) At this point, he's not sure he even wants to go to college, at least right away; he says he can't stand the thought of four more years of sitting in a classroom. The funny thing is that he actually likes learning for learning's sake more than his sister, so I keep telling him that college is not like high school - no more interactive notebooks...!! Don't get me started. :-)

    But yes, it's another factor to consider because I think in the end he will decide to go to an in-state college. I suppose this may help our NPC/EFC, but in reality, I'm sure it will cost more out-of-pocket if both are in school. Good to think longer term!
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