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Does being marriend and having a kid affect financial aid?

thedarkstormthedarkstorm Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
Hey guys, I was wondering if being married and having a kid will affect how much financial aid I will likely get? I've never applied for it before.

Also, we just filed taxes for 2018-2019 - I was the only one working and we made just under 40k (after taxes) with my income.

I am just wondering how much financial aid I am looking at getting. I am going to be applying to ASU online and am 31.

Thanks!

Replies to: Does being marriend and having a kid affect financial aid?

  • thumper1thumper1 Registered User Posts: 73,807 Senior Member
    No you filed taxes for the 2018 calendar year.

    If you are starting college in fall 2019...you will need your taxes for both you and your husband from 2017 calendar year.
  • thedarkstormthedarkstorm Registered User Posts: 12 New Member
    I am actually planning on starting Spring of 2020. Will being married and having a child affect the amount I end up getting?
  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone Registered User Posts: 20,229 Senior Member
    You will file FAFSA as an independent. You will say you have a family household of 3. Those things do change your FA.

    If you are asking if you will get extra FA because you are married with a child, no. You'll get aid determined by the formula for a independent student.
  • mommdcmommdc Registered User Posts: 10,873 Senior Member
    Run the EFC calculator on the Collegeboard website, federal methodology. It will give you the FAFSA EFC.
    If it is below $6,000 you might get a Pell Grant.
  • DustyfeathersDustyfeathers Registered User Posts: 3,263 Senior Member
    If you're female, several of the women's colleges have special programs for women with children and FA associated with that. Tufts also used to have one, maybe still does.

    Check Smith, Mt. Holyoke, Bryn Mawr, Agnes Scott, Hollins, Simmons and Mills to see if they have special programs.
  • mommdcmommdc Registered User Posts: 10,873 Senior Member
    I think the student wants to take online college classes since they have a full-time job.
  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Forum Champion Financial Aid, Forum Champion Alabama Posts: 84,614 Forum Champion
    edited February 7
    I am actually planning on starting Spring of 2020.

    I don’t think that matters. It’s still the 2019-20 school year for FAFSA. So prior prior.

    Heads up!! One big problem with spring starts is that you could be mislead by the loan award.

    Let me explain, since you wouldn’t have been in school for fall, then they’ll combine your loan for spring....so you might get $9500 in loans for spring.

    BUT....then you’d be mislead into thinking that for Fall 2020, you’d also get that much, and you would NOT. You’d get HALF of that for Fall semester.

  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Forum Champion Financial Aid, Forum Champion Alabama Posts: 84,614 Forum Champion
    Are you OOS for that school? If so, you’re still going to have a huge bill.

    Run their NPC and see what you’d get.

    Are you a first time freshman? It sounds like you’ve been out of high school for awhile.

  • aunt beaaunt bea Registered User Posts: 9,572 Senior Member
    Everything is based on your income, the school's costs, how many units you are taking. No one here can tell you exactly what your funding will be, if any. That's why you need to check the NPC's.
    If you are expecting a full ride, I think you'll be disappointed.
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