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Out of State Merit Scholarships

addygefreaddygefre 13 replies1 threads New Member
Hello! I am an out of state Junior from Minnesota interested in University of Florida due to excellent pre-health program. I would likely major in public health, microbiology, and/or business administration. I will not receive FA anywhere, have no college fund, and am receiving no help from parents.
I want to know if anyone thinks I am competitive for a merit scholarship at U of F.
-white female
-full IB candidate
-16 dual enrollment credits at private university my school is on the campus of
-summer college math classes
-1550+ SAT, retaking for higher, perfect for math
-NHS with lots of community service hours
-Tennis Captain and State participant (not good enough for Florida though!)
-worked all through high school
-good rec letters
GPA is unweighted at my school, probably like a 3.8 ish
Thank you so much for your time! I really appreciate all the input I can get while trying to narrow down schools that I have a good chance at merit aid for.
37 replies
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Replies to: Out of State Merit Scholarships

  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 3850 replies70 threads Senior Member
    Did you take the PSAT/are you a National Merit Semi-Finalist?

    Just to clarify...your parents have a high income but will not contribute any money for college costs?
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  • addygefreaddygefre 13 replies1 threads New Member
    I did. I am not. I received a 1420- not national merit material.
    Yes, that is correct.
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  • GatorDad305GatorDad305 431 replies24 threads Member
    If you are paying yourself, then UF is probably not your best bet. You will get more merit money from other state schools like Alabama, for example. What about univ of Minn?

    UF is not known for big merit awards. Most in state kids qualify for bright futures scholarships, which can cover full tuition.

    If your heart is set on Florida, you would be better served to look at USF, UCF and even FSU (offers a tuition waiver to some out of state kids)
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  • addygefreaddygefre 13 replies1 threads New Member
    thank you so much for your advice! I really appreciate it!
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  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 3850 replies70 threads Senior Member
    edited February 25
    Self-funding your college costs will be limiting...and unfortunately will dictate what your options are. Why won't your parents contribute? Would you be able to live at home and attend either community college or one of the U Minnesota system 4 year colleges?

    At U Alabama you would qualify for $26K scholarship, but total COA is around $51K, leaving $25K of costs, per year. That is not going to be affordable without your parents' help. https://scholarships.ua.edu/freshman/out-of-state/

    U Minnesota merit options seem more limited than U Alabama. Take a look here, to see if there are any opportunities where you fit the requirements. https://admissions.tc.umn.edu/costsaid/schol_campus.html

    Also look at the other U Minnesota system schools. Take a look at U New Mexico, ASU, and U Arizona, too.

    To build some savings, can you get a full-time job this summer? Work part-time now and senior year, then again full-time summer following senior year? Depending on the job(s) you may be able to save $5K-$10K that way. HS students in my area can make $15/hour babysitting/nannying on the weekends and full-time in the summers.

    You will also be able to take out a total of $27K in Federal Direct Student Loans over the four undergrad years: $5,500 freshman year, then $6,500/$7,500/$7,500.

    Even if you can cobble together $10K with work earnings plus loan each year, it might be a good option to consider community college for a couple of years, maintain a part-time job, and then transfer to a 4 year school to complete your degree.

    Do some research on past CC threads too...there are many, here is one:
    https://talk.collegeconfidential.com/financial-aid-scholarships/2161948-let-s-talk-regional-exchange-universities-that-also-give-merit-to-further-reduce-costs.html#latest

    I'll also call @thumper1 @mom2collegekids @MYOS1634 for other ideas.
    edited February 25
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  • bgbg4usbgbg4us 1519 replies44 threads Senior Member
    hey addygfre - you have some great stats and have worked hard! well done. I think if you look around, you can find some colleges that will give you really good deals on tuition; some full tuition; some really reduced.

    but, what's very hard to find are schools that cover room & board. That runs around $11-14K per year, and the majority of the time, freshmen are required to pay that.

    Some schools have a few full-ride scholarships that cover all; but those are very very competitive. So - I just want you to keep this all in mind. It's good you are starting to look at it all now. Keep working hard!
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  • chenlnchenln 12 replies0 threads New Member
    Thank you for starting this thread. I know many people in this situation and will continue to follow. Good luck.
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  • addygefreaddygefre 13 replies1 threads New Member
    U of MN gives close to full merit rides to students from my school. However, due to my family situation I really need to get out of state.
    I work a lot but with costs of my long commute to school, car insurance, books for college classes, ect. I cannot save much even without frivolous spending.
    I am considering many of schools that give merit aid such as Lehigh, UMich Ann Arbor, UMass Amherst, ect. I have had to cross many schools off of my list due to not wanting to lose transfer college/IB credits I have already completed.
    I know that I will have to take on a great deal of debt and I am okay with and prepared for that.
    Thank you for your input!
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  • addygefreaddygefre 13 replies1 threads New Member
    Along with UPitt and Tulane. However I know many of these scholarships are highly competitive.
    What I am most looking for is a school that accepts transfer credits from dual enrollment and IB, large enough to have summer courses so I can graduate early, and merit scholarships to offset cost. I could not care less where the school is located as long as its not in Minnesota.
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  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 3850 replies70 threads Senior Member
    addygefre wrote: »
    U of MN gives close to full merit rides to students from my school. However, due to my family situation I really need to get out of state.
    I work a lot but with costs of my long commute to school, car insurance, books for college classes, ect. I cannot save much even without frivolous spending.
    I am considering many of schools that give merit aid such as Lehigh, UMich Ann Arbor, UMass Amherst, ect. I have had to cross many schools off of my list due to not wanting to lose transfer college/IB credits I have already completed.
    I know that I will have to take on a great deal of debt and I am okay with and prepared for that.
    Thank you for your input!

    This is helpful.

    It sounds like you are preparing well, but needing to get minimum of a full tuition award will make all schools reaches. You will need to cast a wide net.

    What do you think you will be able to spend per year, counting the direct student loan?

    Lehigh and U Mich (for OOS) do not offer much merit...what are you seeing that suggests they do? I would be surprised if you could get anything approaching full tuition...and then you still have room and board costs as well as transportation costs, etc.

    Be careful with dual enrollment/IB credit and confirm that you will get credit before committing to any school. It can take a lot of digging to figure this things out. Public schools tend to offer more credit (in terms of allowing one to potentially graduate early) than do private schools.

    It's great that you are starting on this early. Your least costly options will be in-state...Minnesota is a big state, why do you have to leave?

    I don't recommend you take out greater than the $27K in Federal Direct Student Loans. Any thing above that will require a co-signer.

    You said you intend on being pre-health type major or bus admin....what type of career are you thinking about? Is med school a goal?

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  • addygefreaddygefre 13 replies1 threads New Member
    Yes, I am planning on attending med school. It is worth noting that once I get to med school, my tuition will be paid for.
    I go to a college prep school and was previously considered by guidance and counseling a competitive applicant for ivies but ended up eliminating those options due to lack of merit aid. I hope this can paint a better picture of my competitiveness.
    Umich lists 18 full rides to out of state students per year and Lehigh also lists minimal full rides. I understand the competition of these but I have already written many of the essays and am prepared to be rejected. I just don’t want to limit my possibilities and want to attend the best school I can.
    I planned on withdrawing no more than 30k per year in federal student loans.
    I have examined maximum credit transfer and what is accepted at all schools carefully.
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  • addygefreaddygefre 13 replies1 threads New Member
    Oops! I missed that I am okay with up to that 30-35k mark a year.
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  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 3850 replies70 threads Senior Member
    Yes, your stats are great and you should certainly apply for full ride scholarships...but they will be highly competitive, with many ivy caliber students competing.

    You need an affordable safety.

    Who will co-sign your undergrad loans in excess of the $27k in total for 4 years?
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  • addygefreaddygefre 13 replies1 threads New Member
    Family members who will co-sign but not pay for school in respect to my parents wishes.
    Thank you for your guidance! I appreciate it so much
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  • thumper1thumper1 77112 replies3427 threads Senior Member
    I planned on withdrawing no more than 30k per year in federal student loans.

    Nope. Your max federally funded student loan is $5500 for the year.

    Will your parents take out loans, or co-sign?

    Regardless...$30,000 a year...$120,000 total loans for undergrad is WAY too much in loans if you plan to go to medical school, where you will need tons of loans!
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  • addygefreaddygefre 13 replies1 threads New Member
    I have enough credits to graduate in 2-2.5 years which I have take into account.
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  • addygefreaddygefre 13 replies1 threads New Member
    Many of these schools have public health programs which enable you to take 33,000 in loans a year.
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  • fl1234fl1234 256 replies1 threads Junior Member
    @addygefre It sounds like you have it all figured out. The cryptic nature of your personal situation (I understand it is sensitive) makes it difficult for people to give input. It does not make sense to me why you HAVE to go OOS. There are no schools in MN that give you the physical buffer with family you want? I imagine that you are living near this family now, and have been for many years. Why not 2-2.5 more years?

    Like other responders, I would caution you against taking significant loans for OOS undergraduate school, it is not worth it. If you cast your net wide enough, you may find someone who gives you a full ride or close to that. But, you will have to do a lot of searching. UF will likely not be that school, unless you are NMF.
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  • Mwfan1921Mwfan1921 3850 replies70 threads Senior Member
    I’m going to page @WayOutWestMom so that she can help OP understand how taking classes in the summer and using DE or IB credits to graduate ug in 2–2.5 years might impact medical school admission.
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  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom 10640 replies229 threads Senior Member
    edited February 25
    Hi @addygefre

    As you know medical school admission is extremely competitive and only about 40% of applicants get accepted in a given year.

    However, I want to caution you that medical schools are extremely reluctant to admit younger than typical students. (Less than 1% of matriculants are age 20.) Med schools will strongly question the maturity level of younger students and it is your job to convince them that you're mature enough to handle med school and the delicate intimacy of treating patients. The median age for newly matriculating students has been on an upward trend for the last decade and a half and is now 25.

    Med schools are extremely picky about pre-requisites. It's a buyer's market and they can afford to be as picky as they want since every med school in the country gets 10X more applications than they have seats.

    You should not assume that you will be able to use your IB credits to complete admission requirements. Also do not assume that you will be able to use DE credits to fulfill admission requirements unless you supplement them with upper level coursework at a 4 year college.

    There are a large number of medical schools that do not accept AP/IB credits to fulfill admission pre-reqs. Full stop.

    Those schools that do accept AP/IB credits strongly recommend (which in med school speak = require ) all applicants supplement any AP/IB credits with an equivalent number of upper level classes in the same department as the AP/IB credits.

    For example, if you have 8 credits for IB general chemistry that are accepted by your undergrad as credit toward graduation, medical schools will still expect you to take an additional 2 semesters/8 credits of inorganic or analytical chemistry in order to be considered a competitive applicants for med school.

    The same holds true for CC credits. Rightly or not, adcomms do not view CC credits as having the same rigor and level of competitiveness as coursework taken at a 4 year college. You are expected to supplement any CC coursework with additional coursework in the same department at a 4 year college.

    Medical schools also do not accept AP/IB credit for required lab classes. Those will need to be taken/re-taken at a 4 year college.

    Medical schools strongly recommend that applicants do NOT take summer pre-req classes. Because of the shorter summer term, summer classes often do not cover all the same material as do regular term classes and do not cover the material with same depth or detail. Something always gets cut out to accommodate the reduced number of class hours during the summer.

    Taking classes in the summer is poor use of a med school applicant's time. Summers are better used to participate in the expected pre-med ECs. ECs are extremely important. Without appropriate ECs you might as well jus throw your med school application in the trash. You won't be considered for an admission.

    Expected pre-med ECs:
    --clinical exposure (paid or volunteer) in direct patient contact positions
    --community service with disadvantaged populations
    --physician shadowing, especially in primary care specialties
    --leadership roles in your activities
    --lab bench or clinical research experience

    While it's great that you have been a high achieving, ambitious student in high school, if med school is your goal, you may need to slow down and follow a slower, more methodical path in undergrad. When it comes to getting a med school admissions, faster does to equal better.
    It is worth noting that once I get to med school, my tuition will be paid for.
    Are you sure?

    Med school tuition is averaging around $45K/year for in-state public med schools. Private and OOS public med schools have tuition in the $60-90K/year range.

    edited February 25
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