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Is there anything I can do? :(

wordsontourwordsontour Registered User Posts: 3 New Member
edited August 2005 in Financial Aid & Scholarships
I have a unique situation with college. I am 21 now, and I know the cutoff to file independently with FAFSA is 24 if not married, orphaned, etc.

My parents and I visited numerous colleges back when I was 18, and we had decided on one in particular. We talked to the financial aid counselor, and realized after a while that we couldn't even apply for FAFSA. My parents had a business which went to court because of problems with a co-owner, and has been locked up for years in the courts. They couldn't file income taxes for almost 10 years now. Therefore, me not being married or orphaned I cannot file independently and they cannot fill out FAFSA. My credit is not good enough for a loan and my parents (the jerks they are) refuse to take out a loan to help me. I've been told by colleges they can't help me because of the situation either. What am I supposed to do? Or do I have to wait another three years because my parents messed up.
Post edited by wordsontour on

Replies to: Is there anything I can do? :(

  • NorthstarmomNorthstarmom Registered User Posts: 24,853 Senior Member
    Don't you have a job? You can go to college part time while working and paying for your college. Start at community colleges, which are inexpensive, and are very welcoming to nontraditional students, including by offering night classes.

    Stop blaming your parents, and take charge of your own destiny. Presumably, you're the one who determined your credit rating. Do what it takes to get a good rating again, and then take out loans.

    Doing what it takes may mean doing things like not spending as much on entertainment or clothes, selling your car and buying a cheaper one, etc. However, if college is something you're determined to attend, you'll do whatever it takes to go -- and you'll stop blaming Mommy and Daddy for your situation.
  • wordsontourwordsontour Registered User Posts: 3 New Member
    You don't need to get an attitude about this. I asked a serious question, don't act like a jerk about it. Don't treat me like a child either with snotty retorts and remarks. Thanks for the sarcastic reply.
  • wordsontourwordsontour Registered User Posts: 3 New Member
    And yes I do have a job. I work almost 30-40 hours a week and only make between 100-200$ each week. I have a used car I don't make payments on, and I don't live on my own. My expenses aren't much.
  • hazmathazmat User Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 8,435 Senior Member
    Couldn't file taxes for 10 years. If that is the case then one presumes they have an attorney or you could probably get one to help you document the situation and approach the FA office again. I don't think you can get by without filing a FAFSA for yourself at least but surely you can seek advice from a JD/CPA or other professional who will be interested to help a student.
  • NorthstarmomNorthstarmom Registered User Posts: 24,853 Senior Member
    "And yes I do have a job. I work almost 30-40 hours a week and only make between 100-200$ each week. I have a used car I don't make payments on, and I don't live on my own. My expenses aren't much."

    So why not start attending community college? If costs are a problem, why not obtain a second job, save your $ and then attend community college?
  • hazmathazmat User Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 8,435 Senior Member
    Have you applied to a school? Have you filled out your part of the FAFSA? I should think you would need to be admitted first and then you can begin speaking about the problem finances. You are 21 and I think that helps and perhaps you can get a waiver of some sort.
  • soccerfanaticsoccerfanatic Registered User Posts: 909 Member
    Yeah I would also suggest looking into work-study, go part-time, and then get serious and do FAFSA and everything once you turn 24.
This discussion has been closed.