Welcome to College Confidential!

The leading college-bound community on the web

Sign Up For Free

Join for FREE, and start talking with other members, weighing in on community discussions, and more.

Also, by registering and logging in you'll see fewer ads and pesky welcome messages (like this one!)

As a CC member, you can:

  • Reply to threads, and start your own.
  • Post reviews of your campus visits.
  • Find hundreds of pages of informative articles.
  • Search from over 3 million scholarships.
Please take a moment to read our updated TOS, Privacy Policy, and Forum Rules.

Do you buy older edition textbooks to save money?

BredericBrederic Registered User Posts: 11 New Member
What are the pros and cons of buying the previous edition of a textbook to avoid the high prices of the latest edition. Does anyone have any experience with this? For example:

"Porth's Pathophysiology: Concepts of Altered Health States" 9th edition costs $240.55 new but the 8th edition costs $216.56 (90%) less. If you want a used textbook the 9th edition costs $73.29 but the 8th edition is only $15.02 (80% less). Here's a side-by-side comparison (http://whichedition.com/books/porths-pathophysiology-concepts-of-altered-health-statesninth-edition,3869/) with publication dates, page counts, and publishers notes for both editions.

Which edition would you buy and why?
«1

Replies to: Do you buy older edition textbooks to save money?

  • gouf78gouf78 Registered User Posts: 5,824 Senior Member
    Does the text have a CD or access code to on-line video? You need to look at info on the text from the seller
  • BredericBrederic Registered User Posts: 11 New Member
    edited September 18
    Good point. The trend toward online content is a move by publishers to devalue their previous editions.
    How many professors use or require the use of the online content in their courses?

    In this case the 8th edition comes with a CD and companion website, and the 9th edition includes access to an online fully searchable online ebook.
  • intparentintparent Registered User Posts: 30,081 Senior Member
    edited September 18
    Ask the prof if it is okay before you do it. With the textbook, it can be hard to follow passages if the location (page #) has changed, and a problem if the chapter review problems are different.
  • BredericBrederic Registered User Posts: 11 New Member
    Those are good tips. Have you tried this yourself?
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 24,934 Senior Member
    You need to understand how content may have changed. Not just bells and whistles. Some newer editions update research or reflect newer thinking.

    Also, you compare by ISBN. And it seems Amazon has the same 9th edition ISBN for less. If you don't need to keep this book, think about renting.
  • BredericBrederic Registered User Posts: 11 New Member
    The only lower price I see on Amazon is for a textbook rental. Is that what you mean about getting the same ISBN for less?

    I think you're right that there are content changes that may not show up in the publisher's notes. I think the only way to be sure an older edition would work without at least some complications would be to do a page by page comparison. I wish that were practical or affordable!
  • intparentintparent Registered User Posts: 30,081 Senior Member
    edited September 18
    My kids rented textbooks -- if it isn't a book you need to own for future grad school prep/studies, you can usually do that. This isn't a new problem, by the way -- we used to wrestle with if 30+ years ago, too.
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 24,934 Senior Member
    edited September 18
    Just ask the prof, as intparent said. And no one checks page by page. But:

    I see that ISBN dates to 2013. So already older. (The 8 is from 2008. I'd forget it.) Amazon has used under $100. See the publisher site lww where they offer it for $138. You need to check if there are additional resources (CD or online key) this doesn't include, whatever supplier you use. You can call the publisher.

    You checked options through your college, right? Cuz I see some offer it less than 200.

    We've ordered via Amazon and from publishers, (had no issues with the latter, but this was some time ago.)
  • BredericBrederic Registered User Posts: 11 New Member
    Cool, my oldest kids are in high school now, but I definitely remember the annoyance of the textbook market from my college days. We didn't have the renting option back then.
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 24,934 Senior Member
    Btw, google by ISBN, that's the unique id.
  • Sportsman88Sportsman88 Registered User Posts: 1,579 Senior Member
    @intparent I had a network of students to buy and sell used books where I got more than the bookstore would give me for buy back and bought used from students at more than bookstore would give them but less than my price at bookstore for used.

    Our battle 30 years ago was prof using a new text every year, and that would happen. But the online code and CD is a big blow to used books savings.
  • BredericBrederic Registered User Posts: 11 New Member
    @Sportsman88 That's a great system.

    Do you know whether the professors are using and requiring the use of the online content most of the time?

  • BredericBrederic Registered User Posts: 11 New Member
    edited September 18
    @lookingforward I haven't done any ordering directly from publishers. Is that an option for students?

    Yeah, a 10 year old textbook is more than half the age of the average college freshman. :)
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 24,934 Senior Member
    As a parent, I ordered hs texts from several publishers. When you get to that point, you call and they'll tell you if there's some issue.

    You need this book? You're in a grad program?
  • BredericBrederic Registered User Posts: 11 New Member
    @lookingforward No, my grad school day are over, thankfully. I was just looking for some feedback on using older editions as a strategy for students in general. I've got three nephews/nieces in college.
«1
Sign In or Register to comment.