Welcome to College Confidential!

The leading college-bound community on the web

Sign Up For Free

Join for FREE, and start talking with other members, weighing in on community discussions, and more.

Also, by registering and logging in you'll see fewer ads and pesky welcome messages (like this one!)

As a CC member, you can:

  • Reply to threads, and start your own.
  • Post reviews of your campus visits.
  • Find hundreds of pages of informative articles.
  • Search from over 3 million scholarships.

Post-graduate study in Europe?

nbachris2788nbachris2788 Registered User Posts: 4,447 Senior Member
edited July 2007 in Graduate School
I'm a few years away from graduation, but I've started to think more about what I plan to do after my undergraduate education. I've been thinking that it'd be a great opportunity to attend a post-graduate institution in Europe. Does anybody know of any complications that would arise from such an intention?
Post edited by nbachris2788 on
«1

Replies to: Post-graduate study in Europe?

  • DespSeekPhdDespSeekPhd Registered User Posts: 991 Member
    Debt. Most European universities will charge you full tuition. If that's not a concern, I think it's be a great opportunity.
  • nbachris2788nbachris2788 Registered User Posts: 4,447 Senior Member
    But since European universities are public, aren't they inherently cheaper than American private schools?
  • DespSeekPhdDespSeekPhd Registered User Posts: 991 Member
    Not necessarily. First of all, the exchange rate right now between dollars and pounds or Euros is brutal for Americans. Secondly, it's pretty expensive to live in Europe. There are cheaper tuition rates for EU residents, but the international tuition is much higher. Also, you must have proof (at least in the UK, probably in several other countries) that you have enough money to pay tuition and support yourself for the entire year. Basically, you have to have a year's worth tuition and living money in a bank account before you are accepted. You can't equate the European system to the American system - I suggest you do a bit of research.
  • naurunauru Registered User Posts: 1,158 Senior Member
    Postgrad in Europe is way cheaper than in the US, at 95% of European universities, even after accounting for the exchange rate and living costs. And yes, this is because so many of them are public. When I applied for graduate schools I applied in both the US and Europe, and did quite a bit of research on this. Only the most expensive European Universities (LSE, LBS, and a few others) can match with their overseas tuition the exorbitant fees charged to domestic students at private universities in the United States.

    I say do your research. There are loads of great programs in Europe, even in non-English-speaking european countries. At the graduate level, a large number of degree programs at European universities are offered entirely in English.

    Full overseas tuition at excellent European universities is a fraction of what you would pay at a private university in the US.
  • nbachris2788nbachris2788 Registered User Posts: 4,447 Senior Member
    After some basic research, it looks like attending UK schools would cost around 20 000 pounds, or roughly 40 000 dollars. Doesn't sound too different from most elite American universities.

    But are European universities, since they're public, more stringent with scholarships? Being a Canadian myself, I know that public schools don't have billion dollar endowments and don't give the kind of generous scholarships that Ivy League level schools do.
  • DespSeekPhdDespSeekPhd Registered User Posts: 991 Member
    "Postgrad in Europe is way cheaper than in the US, at 95% of European universities, even after accounting for the exchange rate and living costs. And yes, this is because so many of them are public. When I applied for graduate schools I applied in both the US and Europe, and did quite a bit of research on this. Only the most expensive European Universities (LSE, LBS, and a few others) can match with their overseas tuition the exorbitant fees charged to domestic students at private universities in the United States."

    Actually, most students in the US don't pay at all for their postgrad. It's increasingly common for PhDs to be fully funded, which includes tuition remission, stipend, and often some health insurance.
  • nbachris2788nbachris2788 Registered User Posts: 4,447 Senior Member
    There are also many fellowships for post-grad study in Europe, like the Fulbright scholarships, right? It's only for one year, but most European universities award Masters degrees after a year, correct?
  • DespSeekPhdDespSeekPhd Registered User Posts: 991 Member
    There aren't "many" fellowships. The Fulbright is VERY difficult to get, especially in western European countries, as they get hundreds of applications for each spot.
  • Professor XProfessor X Registered User Posts: 893 Member
    I am curious as to why no one is mentioning that in most academic fields (rather than vocational/professional ones, like an MBA, MPA, MEd, or MSW), graduate study in the US is most usually paid for by assistantships and fellowships, which carry full tuition remission as well as a stipend..
  • oops_jooops_jo Registered User Posts: 21 New Member
    Well Professor X, that's probably because it was indeed mentioned by DespSeekPhD
  • Professor XProfessor X Registered User Posts: 893 Member
    Thanks oops-jo! My bad!
  • urrjunurrjun Registered User Posts: 67 Junior Member
    From what Ive seen in Europe\ you find a professor to match your Phd interest and join a project; which is relatively easy since the admissions process is not as cutthroat as the US (at the school I am at, as long as you have above a certain grade % your last year of undergrad, you are accepted). However it is ENTIRELY up to the student to find funding through related colleges/departments. Also, since most students leave undergrad with a combined bachelor/Masters degree(Msc), there will probably not be coursework for PhD students.
  • quicksilver40133quicksilver40133 - Posts: 281 Junior Member
    Just an additional thought: to the best of my knowledge, postsecondary education (both undergraduate and graduate) is generally regarded as better in the US than in Europe. It will depend upon the program and university, obviously, but perceived educational quality should be a factor in your decision.
  • bruno123bruno123 Registered User Posts: 1,390 Senior Member
    Just an additional thought: to the best of my knowledge, postsecondary education (both undergraduate and graduate) is generally regarded as better in the US than in Europe. It will depend upon the program and university, obviously, but perceived educational quality should be a factor in your decision.

    Personally, I think undergraduate education is actually better in Europe than in the US, particularly in math and natural sciences, which are studied at a much deeper level in European universities. On average, the US compares favorably to Europe though in professional education (medicine, law, business) and for advanced research degrees (PhD). There are however several world-class institutions in Europe for doctoral studies, e.g. Cambridge, Oxford, Imperial College, and LSE in the UK, or ETH in Switzerland.
  • Bieu203Bieu203 Registered User Posts: 120 Junior Member
    To add on to that list Sciences Po and ENA of France too for those who are interested in political science/international relation.
«1
This discussion has been closed.