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Where does this put her?

RocketRiderRocketRider Registered User Posts: 19 New Member
edited April 2013 in Home Schooling and College
Hi again... dd's SAT results in today... they look pretty good to _me_ but where does this put her in regards to scholarships/good schools?

Reading 800 Math 670 writing 730 overall 2200
Sat II Bio 790 Chem 700 Lit 720

She's possibly a National Merit semifinalist from the PSATs
We just sent in a Questbridge application for help with... applications, I believe. We are in the upper end of their income scale so I don't think we'll be accepted, though they did send us a letter.

For some background info, dd has been homeschooled and started community college half-time at 14. We always figured she would just take those credits and apply to a local state college at the typical age of 17-18. But if she has excellent scores and a scholarship, she could possibly attend a better school than we had anticipated.

One monkey-wrench in the works is that she has food allergy so severe that it would be impossible for her to eat safely at any college cafeteria -- she would definitely feel most comfortable close enough for me to help restock her food supply.
Post edited by RocketRider on

Replies to: Where does this put her?

  • sbjdorlosbjdorlo Registered User Posts: 4,791 Senior Member
    Hi RocketRider,

    As far as test scores go, those are great scores and make your D competitive at any school. Of course, schools are looking for a whole lot more than test scores, but as far as your question goes, yes, those test scores are very good!

    I guess the big question for you is, if your daughter's allergies are so severe that you feel she needs to go to college close by, your options are local colleges or moving to where she goes to school if she chooses to apply to farther away colleges.

    No easy answers. My middle son has multiple issues including type 1 diabetes and at this moment, we feel he should live at home during college. We may have the flexibility to move since my dh is eligible to retire in 1 1/2 years. Otherwise, we would make a local college work if he goes to college.
  • GeekMom63GeekMom63 Registered User Posts: 1,957 Senior Member
    There's nothing wrong with going to the local state college you've been planning on all along. But it could be possible to branch out, too.

    I don't know much about food allergies, but I do know two girls who are away at two separate colleges with severe allergies. It can be done, with private kitchens, etc. Not trying to tell you what to do, just to say that it IS possible to go away. My son wouldn't be able to take care of himself in that way, though.

    Or you could consider a school a 6 hour drive away and come monthly and stock the freezer. (could you do that for me too please? :) )
  • RocketRiderRocketRider Registered User Posts: 19 New Member
    Thanks to both of you. :-) I know, I have a whole new level of guilt now... what if she could go to a *great* college, and we hold ourselves back because of the disability? You've made me feel better that "plan B" might just be the best one, after all.

    sbjdorlo, your diabetic son in a very similar situation as my daughter; the caution about food, and the potential for disastrous situations are much the same. So I'm sure you "get it". I'm just afraid she'll get an offer from somewhere great and... and...

    Thanks too for the info about the scores. Poor kid, second thing I said was, "Well, maybe you can take it again and bring up that math score. I think "they" like to see it above 700!" But I guess we'll let her slide by now... :-D
  • sbjdorlosbjdorlo Registered User Posts: 4,791 Senior Member
    RocketRider,

    Well, she *could* retake the SAT if she really wanted to. :-) I confess my goal for my son was 2250 (have no clue why that was a goal) and above 700 on all subsections. But I really think it depends on the major and other factors.

    My 15 year old (diabetic son) will take the SAT this June. I have no doubt he'll take it again next year or senior year because of his math score. :-)

    Good one, GeekMom! Hey, my son and his buddies at MIT recently cooked meals for a group of young women (this was an event with Campus Crusade for Christ), so anything's possible! LOL
  • WonderGirl2013WonderGirl2013 Registered User Posts: 42 Junior Member
    Does she plan to earn an Associate's degree? I ask this because colleges will not question the credibility of her Homeschool/highschool diploma if she does have a degree from an accredited institution. I am assuming she is a dual credit student.
  • marblingmarbling Registered User Posts: 158 Junior Member
    >>> I ask this because colleges will not question the credibility of her Homeschool/highschool diploma if she does have a degree from an accredited institution. I am assuming she is a dual credit student.

    The vast majority of colleges will not question the credibility of her diploma/transcripts. She has the test scores to back up her grades. For the handful of colleges across the country which might balk, a student can just choose to go elsewhere. It's just not a real issue.
  • GeekMom63GeekMom63 Registered User Posts: 1,957 Senior Member
    Colleges want outside verification, but that doesn't mean an entire associate degree, it means good test scores, a few classes, and letters of recommendation.
  • johngflynn657johngflynn657 Registered User Posts: 3 New Member
    Thanks to both of you. :-) I know, I have a whole new level of guilt now... what if she could go to a *great* college, and we hold ourselves back because of the disability? You've made me feel better that "plan B" might just be the best one, after all.
This discussion has been closed.