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How Is Getting Into College/Universities Using A Homeschooling Diploma and Transcript Honestly Fair?

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Replies to: How Is Getting Into College/Universities Using A Homeschooling Diploma and Transcript Honestly Fair?

  • albert69albert69 Registered User Posts: 3,247 Senior Member
    We're talking about home schoolers here, not high school dropouts. They are not synonymous.
  • TsunadePrimrosesTsunadePrimroses Registered User Posts: 76 Junior Member
    No, of course homeschooled kids aren't the same as highschool dropouts. I never said that they were. What I said in my original question was: "What I'm saying is, how is it FAIR that someone can just print a diploma or transcripts up from their computer, and then use them for college entry? The fact of the matter is that anyone could simply write a transcript and say they were homeschooled."

    And so far, not one person has given me a straight answer. At all.
  • albert69albert69 Registered User Posts: 3,247 Senior Member
    It is fair. Home schooled kids go to school at home, thus their transcripts should come from home. Simple as that. Public schooled kids go to school at the school, so their transcripts come from there. That simple.
  • TsunadePrimrosesTsunadePrimroses Registered User Posts: 76 Junior Member
    OK, but what would stop someone from lying on the transcripts if printing them at home is totally fine? Can you honestly not see my point?!
  • austinmshauriaustinmshauri Registered User Posts: 7,685 Senior Member
    @TsunadePrimroses, What prevents most public schools from lying on the transcripts they print for their students?
  • albert69albert69 Registered User Posts: 3,247 Senior Member
    edited April 2015
    Wow, it must be nice to have such a marvelous life that you have to borrow trouble so adamantly. Cry me a river.

    The answer that you're looking for is that nothing can really stop someone from making a fraudulent transcript. That doesn't mean that it will benefit them, however.
  • ZekesimaZekesima Registered User Posts: 360 Member
    edited April 2015
    OP--my son is now in public high school, but I homeschooled him through 8th grade. For junior high, I gave my son a 3.8 gpa for the classes he took at home, including some advanced courses (i.e. my husband taught my son chemistry using his old Cornell University materials). At our homeschool an A- was 3.7, not 4.0 as at the local schools. Also, I never considered that I should be weighting some of my son's grades (I didn't know about this practice until after he'd started at the local HS). So, my son's GPA was actually lower than it should have been (which may have hurt him when applying for admission to a prestigious local STEM program--he didn't get in). So, sometimes parental grading can be tougher than that of the local the school system.
  • TsunadePrimrosesTsunadePrimroses Registered User Posts: 76 Junior Member
    The Atlanta schools link you posted on page 1 is a decent example of what can happen if someone tries to commit fraud in the public school system. Once someone finds out there's been cheating, there are other sectors of the government and multiple people that can be used to help and solve any fraud issues. Or, even if no one ever found any fraud or didn't care to look for it for whatever the reason...There would still always be the possibility of finding any lying or cheating.

    Not like how in a homeschooling situation, where someone could literally just print a transcript from their home computer.

    Who would be there to stop anyone who was lying about the homeschooling, at all?
  • albert69albert69 Registered User Posts: 3,247 Senior Member
    Why is this such a concern to you? Do you know anything about the legal requirements for home schooling? They do exist, believe it or not.
  • TsunadePrimrosesTsunadePrimroses Registered User Posts: 76 Junior Member
    Oh! I didn't realize there were more replies @austinmshauri for my response.

    To the others: How you personally feel or your personal situations,wouldn't stop anyone from printing whatever they wanted to on their home computer...It concerns me because I don't feel like it's fair to be able to just print something and not have to provide proof! For the colleges at least. Yes, I'm aware that there are homeschooling laws, but I was talking about college admissions. How is that honestly fair?
  • albert69albert69 Registered User Posts: 3,247 Senior Member
    Thank you, @LKnomad. While I do think that standardized tests only show so much, one has to be at least semi-educated to score reasonably. Home schooled kids can be on par with all levels of kids from public education systems. If they were not educated, they wouldn't be.
  • TsunadePrimrosesTsunadePrimroses Registered User Posts: 76 Junior Member
    @LKnomad Yes, that's what I meant to a T. But, the problem I have...Do you realize that if someone attends a community college first, then they don't always need to take any of those tests in order to get into universities? Do you see how EASY it would be to commit fraud?
  • albert69albert69 Registered User Posts: 3,247 Senior Member
    edited April 2015
    Okay, we get your problem. Got any solutions? Let me guess - more government regulations?

    As for the community college to regular universities - you don't even need a transcript to get into community colleges as a dual credit student. But if the student can do the work, how is it wrong to let them take classes and then transfer?
  • TsunadePrimrosesTsunadePrimroses Registered User Posts: 76 Junior Member
    @albert No, not exactly...Off the top of my head: What if in order to attend CC and universities, all students had to complete highschool equivalence? NOT the GED, but either attending a physical highschool or doing an online program? Otherwise, don't go to college. I know you'll probably hate my answer, but you asked for one.
This discussion has been closed.