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CGPA, GPA, Percentage

anvesh95anvesh95 Registered User Posts: 302 Member
edited February 2012 in India
I was wondering about how Colleges Convert Percentages from Indian Schools to their Level, because the level of difficulty is pretty high here, compared to there.
I have like a 76% in 11th, and thats the 4th highest percentage for my school.
If they converted that to gpa, it would be somewhere like 2.5.

So anyone knows? :)
Post edited by anvesh95 on
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Replies to: CGPA, GPA, Percentage

  • Tizil7Tizil7 Registered User Posts: 1,686 Senior Member
    anvesh wrote:
    because the level of difficulty is pretty high here, compared to there.
    Not by much. In fact, if you look at the whole schooling experience, I would rate them at par with us. That's a discussion for another time though.

    They look at your percentages in perspective to others at your school or region. These regions are divided by the university itself. You can read more about it online. There's this person who choose to do his PhD in how the admission process at Harvard works. I can't find the exact source, but his thesis deals with how Harvard (and plausibly other universities) divide applicants into regions based on population.
  • tastyclestastycles Registered User Posts: 183 Junior Member
    The difficulty here isn't more, the way marks are given is. A fail here is 40%, whereas in some US schools its 60%. So that accounts for the disparity of our marks converted using a US GPA scale.
  • idream17idream17 Registered User Posts: 286 Junior Member
    What would a 10 CGPA in 9th and 10th get converted to? And (sorry for being na
  • tastyclestastycles Registered User Posts: 183 Junior Member
    Some high schools in the US give more weightage to certain subjects/courses while calculating a students GPA. Like honours or AP classes. Sometimes junior/senior year courses are given more weight in calculating the average. So if you're using weights while calculation you get a weighted GPA, but if you use a simple conversion scale(A is 4, B is 3.....) you get an unweighted GPA.
  • anvesh95anvesh95 Registered User Posts: 302 Member
    so there is no definitive way to convert cgpa/percentage to gpa ?
  • desivaderdesivader Registered User Posts: 31 Junior Member
    You don't need to convert your school's grading to US standards. Admission offices have officers assigned to different regions who understand the local grading systems and opportunities present.

    Moreover, the school profile that you send also gives the adcoms some idea about how the grading is done.

    I personally sent them my transcripts with my original school grading. I would suggest you do the same. Your counselor can then explain the grading, any inflation/deflation policies etc, in the school profile.
  • Mrinal2207Mrinal2207 Registered User Posts: 779 Member
    just send ur transcripts with ur ORIGINAL grades or marks. Leave the rest to the colleges.
    There are more important things in college admission than converting ur grades into GPA.
  • tastyclestastycles Registered User Posts: 183 Junior Member
    There are agencies that you can contact which will convert school grades into a GPA. In fact you need to for certain colleges. Georgia Tech requires that.
  • akiettaakietta Registered User Posts: 114 Junior Member
    if you get 10 CGPA then convert that to percentage i.e 10*9.5=95
    Now divide 95/25 then your gpa will be around 3.7 or 3.8.
    But the above figures are not correct because if you get >= 95 Marks then your GPA will be same.
  • Mrinal2207Mrinal2207 Registered User Posts: 779 Member
    You really dont need to convert percentage to gpa, colleges can do that!!
  • tastyclestastycles Registered User Posts: 183 Junior Member
    That may pose a problem for them.

    I guess that they understand ICSE better then.
  • idream17idream17 Registered User Posts: 286 Junior Member
    ^^^ exactly. Those figures are not correct because getting a CGPA 10 does NOT mean you've got 95%. And since 10 is the highest CGPA one can get, it would be incorrect to convert it to 3.7 or 3.8 gpa's. That is implying its impossible to get >95% or >3.8 gpa in India.
  • tastyclestastycles Registered User Posts: 183 Junior Member
    In any case, GPA's are meant for all 4 years of high school. So your school marks play a much greater role in it than one-off board marks.
  • anvesh95anvesh95 Registered User Posts: 302 Member
    Oh right, I was just wondering, because I have a couple friends with a 3.7-3.8 GPA in the US, and that's like an average GPA. But I have a 76% in 11th , and that's pretty low, but it's like in the top 10 of my school.
  • ENVY94ENVY94 Registered User Posts: 13 New Member
    I would really like to hear the answer to that question. Every year, my school's students get selected by Georgia Tech and UIUC, and rejected by Universities with similar acceptance rates.

    One of my seniors is matriculated in Penn State, and his counselor told him that most US universities don't care about CBSE simply because they don't trust it. They rely on SAT marks and essays for evaluation.

    Georgia Tech asks applicants studying under foreign education systems to convert their marks into some sort of a GPA (which is usually high even for average students) through a credit evaluation agency, and UIUC only asks for grade 10 board marks (which are generally a lot higher than school marks). I think this accounts for their accepting more CBSE students compared to other Unis. However, I may be wrong. This is just speculation.
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