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Andhra Pradesh State Boards - what is their value vs the CBSE?

johndoe7todayjohndoe7today Registered User Posts: 16 New Member
edited February 2012 in India
My score in the 10th Standard was 83%. I did this under SSC - the AP state board

Score in the 11th & 12th standards was 81% mean. I did this under BIE - again AP state board, called "Intermediate 1st and 2nd years".

Compared to the CBSE, which is "harder" or "easier" depending on who you talk to, are my scores less valuable to colleges? Do international colleges tend to look down upon the state board results?
Post edited by johndoe7today on

Replies to: Andhra Pradesh State Boards - what is their value vs the CBSE?

  • Tizil7Tizil7 Registered User Posts: 1,686 Senior Member
    This is probably the worst place to ask, considering we're students, much the same as you. The proper people to ask this would be admissions offices of each individual college that you are planning to apply. Anyways, from what I know, you're not at any disadvantage.

    Note: The part in bold answers your question. Just for emphasis.
  • johndoe7todayjohndoe7today Registered User Posts: 16 New Member
    Thank you, Tizil. I've read your posts on many topics here, and your 'from what I know' is good enough for me :)

    I'll make it a point to ask the colleges I would like to attend, though.
  • Tizil7Tizil7 Registered User Posts: 1,686 Senior Member
    Sorry, I may have come across as rude john doe :) Basically, from what I have read on colleges' website, they claim and do look at an applicant within perspective. Otherwise wouldn't all top schools have rich white kids? :p

    So as long as you do the best within the boundaries of the opportunities provided to you, you will not be at any disadvantage.
  • johndoe7todayjohndoe7today Registered User Posts: 16 New Member
    Oh no, you were not rude at all! I am grateful to have a doubt that's been gnawing me clarified. I've read more than a few posts by others elsewhere that are downright spiteful and unnecessarily angry... you are simply being honest and giving me sound advice. Much appreciated!

    I really have a long way to go before I am anywhere near 'applicant' status. Tons of research needs to be conducted. In fact, my situation is very different from other 'hardcore' students here, I'm 22 years old (no degree yet), and working freelance - it might not be a surprise if I end up applying 2 years down the line (it's already late, so why not wait for even more financial stability).

    However, this was one great doubt for me, and this is something I cannot go back and change. I'm still game for SAT, I can & will hit a 2350+ when I get around to it. But high school, I cannot repeat or repair (it was back in 2007 that I got my 12th results), so I wanted to know if this has already precluded me from applying to the Ivys at all... and your post has given reassurance :)
  • tastyclestastycles Registered User Posts: 183 Junior Member
    I really doubt your high school marks would of much importance if you've had a 5-7 year gap from education.

    BTW, you should look into Continuing Education programs that many universities offer. Like the School of General Studies at Columbia. They tend to accept older students who've had a break from education in greater numbers.
  • Tizil7Tizil7 Registered User Posts: 1,686 Senior Member
    tastycles wrote:
    I really doubt your high school marks would of much importance if you've had a 5-7 year gap from education.
    Don't doubt it. It's not correct. How else would colleges get educational perspective? :rolleyes:

    Anyways, johndoe, your special condition could present some anomalies - could be either good or bad, I can't say. From what I know, colleges don't have a problem with delayed education due to military service. You'll have to check with your colleges separately.

    Here's the best news: since you are 22, you should definitely check out Columbia's School of General Studies :D

    EDIT: Just read tasty's full post, even he mentioned Columbia GS :)
  • johndoe7todayjohndoe7today Registered User Posts: 16 New Member
    Tastycles (bold handle I must note :P), that's excellent advice about Columbia's GS. I wasn't even aware of such programs... let me see: ivy league prestige (check), better chances of getting in (check), academic rigor (check), better fitting social ecosystem (check). I will certainly look into this, thank you :)

    Tizil, thank you for that - I did hope my education so far is not worthless now simply because of reasons of, :cough:, vintage.

    Unfortunately, I've never served in the military. So yes, the question of why this delay happened will hang quite heavily in the air for any admissions officer. However, I believe this to be an advantage. I am otherwise quite lackluster in academic or extra curricular achievements to be frank (your typical Indian tier-2 town student); but I have a ton of life experience, multiple professionals like doctors as clients who I built software for - who will write stellar recommendations if I only ask, a personality acutely tuned to marketing myself and making the best of what opportunities I have. The troublesome past seas I have sailed through the years, along with my family, have been nothing if not a wake-up call to what would have been a person doomed to perpetual mediocrity.

    Looking at the lofty principles that institutes like Harvard or MIT seem to uphold, at least on their about pages, about what kind of students they like to admit - I don't see too much of a problem getting in, if only they give me a chance and hear me out. This was why I was worried about the apparent sub-standard nature of my certification - worried that I will be 'weeded' out before being given due consideration. Thanks again for clearing that up :)

    It is now a question of finances. Do I wait till I can pay my way in (oh it *will* happen), or do I apply now and look for aid? Many claim that not asking for aid doubles the chances of acceptance, and that's an alluring prospect... and so on my mind bumbles away making this post much longer than it already is - thanks again you both :)
  • HCaulfieldHCaulfield Registered User Posts: 150 Junior Member
    @johndoe7today

    "Many claim that not asking for aid doubles the chances of acceptance, and that's an alluring prospect"

    MIT is need-blind. And so is Harvard.
    They dole out aid based on your need. They do not let your request for aid come in the way of your acceptance. These places will fund you if they believe you deserve a place in their class. They don't let the finance-factor come between them and someone they want.
  • johndoe7todayjohndoe7today Registered User Posts: 16 New Member
    HCaulfield, those are encouraging words, thanks!

    Then the only thing remaining now is to "Dare to dream", I reckon :)
  • rrroarrrroar Registered User Posts: 33 Junior Member
    @john: Not sure if u still need an answer, but I asked the same question to colleges and they replied saying it doesn't matter which school you go to, since many students don't get to choose. They only see to that you "make use of all your opportunities". Though, they want like rigourous syllabus.
  • HCaulfieldHCaulfield Registered User Posts: 150 Junior Member
    @johndoe7today

    My best friend made it to Stanford in Early Action with aid. And that best friend belongs to the same board as you...So chill! :) No one discriminates on the basis of the board you chose. All that matters is how well you have used the opportunities that were available to you.
  • johndoe7todayjohndoe7today Registered User Posts: 16 New Member
    rrroar, "Rigorous" is subjective. But Caulfield's post right after yours cleared that up. Thanks a lot for replying with details of your personal experience :)

    HCaulfied, I wish your friend the best of luck, even after the fact that such a talented person needs no help from luck; and you too, in all your application endeavors. Thank you for another excellent answer, it makes me really hopeful - and I say hope is always the most important thing (second only to Time, of course) :)
This discussion has been closed.