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Second bachelor degree

LionKidLionKid Registered User Posts: 72 Junior Member
I'm sorry if it's the wrong sub-forum,but I have a question.

I'm currently studying in Romania and will be entering my 3rd and final year with a degree in finance-banking. I was wondering if I can get a second undergraduate degree in the U.S in the same or similar major.

I am a US citizen if that matters.
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Replies to: Second bachelor degree

  • b@r!um[email protected]!um Registered User Posts: 10,319 Senior Member
    Yes, but why would you want to? You could get an American Master's degree from a better university in a shorter period of time.
  • LionKidLionKid Registered User Posts: 72 Junior Member
    Well, I lack necessary internships that would make me competitive and also the fact that my school lacks some courses that would most probably exist in good US schools.

    I am planning to go study at a CC for two years and then transfer good maybe even top university,is it possible? Would my age be a factor? do I have to mention my previous degree?
  • guineagirl96guineagirl96 Forum Champion Math/Computer Science, Forum Champion Richmond Posts: 3,834 Forum Champion
    edited August 2014
    Many US colleges don't allow second bachelors and the ones that do will only let you do it in an unrelated field. I don't know if there's an exception to a degree earned in another country though.
  • aunt beaaunt bea Registered User Posts: 9,165 Senior Member
    Full fees at the CC and the universities paying non-resident tuition. You wont qualify for any financial aid.
  • aunt beaaunt bea Registered User Posts: 9,165 Senior Member
    Agree with guineagirl, you may not be able to major in the same field. You need to be aware that you will be returning to your country after you complete your education here and will not be sponsored for jobs. The immigration laws are strict. If a company tries to sponsor a non-citizen, they are required to state that there are no US citizens available for the position. In a business major like finance, that is not going to happen.
  • aunt beaaunt bea Registered User Posts: 9,165 Senior Member
    Sorry, I missed the citizen thing. But, for a second degree, you have to foot the bill on your own.
  • LionKidLionKid Registered User Posts: 72 Junior Member
    What if I don't mention that I have a bachelor in the first place? Is it possible?
  • b@r!um[email protected]!um Registered User Posts: 10,319 Senior Member
    What if I don't mention that I have a bachelor in the first place? Is it possible?

    That could get you into all sorts of trouble. Giving false information on your financial aid application (this includes denying a previous college degree!) is punishable by 5 years in prison. Of course you'll have to repay any assistance you have received up to that point. In addition, the university you are attending may retroactively revoke your offer of admission or your degree if they find out that you lied on your application for admission.
    Well, I lack necessary internships that would make me competitive and also the fact that my school lacks some courses that would most probably exist in good US schools.
    You don't need internships. Just start working a full-time job! Or attend a graduate program that doesn't expect work experience.

    As for coursework, you could easily fill a few gaps while in graduate school. Or you can take a handful of classes as a non-degree-seeking student. I don't see why you'd pay $100,000 - $200,000 for a second undergraduate degree from a second-rate university if you can get everything you want (work experience, a hanful of courses you couldn't take in Romania) for sooo much cheaper.
  • BrownParentBrownParent Registered User Posts: 12,776 Senior Member
    edited August 2014
    What if you commit fraud, you ask? Maybe you can just rob a bank to pay for it. Oh, woops, you are in finance so I suppose you prefer to stick to white collar crime. I don't think you are going to get advice that encourages law breaking.
  • LionKidLionKid Registered User Posts: 72 Junior Member
    edited August 2014
    First of all I have no intention of asking for financial aid,I would have mentioned that in my first post.
    Second of all I'm not planning on studying at a second-rate university, if i'm going to spend money on another education i'm going to make sure it will be worth it.

    EDIT: What if I put a halt to my studies and attend a CC and after that transfer to a University. Can I do that? Would my age be a problem?
  • artloversplusartloversplus Registered User Posts: 8,314 Senior Member
    You can transfer now, without going to an american CC. However, most of the credits will not transfer, you will be set back one to two years for an US degree. In addition, all elite institutions do not accept many transfers, Princeton for one, does not accept any, others accept a few. With your international status, your chances to get in an elite school is slim to none. You can try as you wish.
  • LionKidLionKid Registered User Posts: 72 Junior Member
    How would they review my transfer application? Would I have to give the SAT's? Will they look into my high school grades?
  • LionKidLionKid Registered User Posts: 72 Junior Member
    By the way would I more chances getting into a good school by trying to transfer directly to the school or through community college?
  • katliamomkatliamom Registered User Posts: 12,172 Senior Member
    edited August 2014
    The answers to your questions depend largely on what school you're talking about. Start by identifying which American schools interest you, then read their websites. Most provide thorough information online about their transfer policies.
  • LionKidLionKid Registered User Posts: 72 Junior Member
    Thank you everyone for the help.

    My final question: If I obtain my bachelors in another country will it count as a bachelor in US or do I have to get a degree in the US to actually count as a bachelor?

    I know it sounds confusing but I need to know if i'm going to put a halt to my currents studies or finish them and start from scratch in the US.
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