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how so many international students afford to study in California?

Marie28Marie28 Registered User Posts: 17 Junior Member
Despite the fact that most Universities in California don't offer financial aid for international students, it is still the state with the major presence of international students. I want to study in California, I plan to attend a Community College and then transfer. Apply to as many scholarships as I can and get a loan if necessary.
But I just want to know HOW so much students afford it, maybe I'm missing on something.

Replies to: how so many international students afford to study in California?

  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston Registered User Posts: 14,995 Senior Member
    Their parents are wealthy.
  • happymomof1happymomof1 Registered User Posts: 28,860 Senior Member
    Exactly.

    What can your parents pay? What will you do if you can't get a scholarship? Where, exactly, do you think you can get a loan, and how much money would you need to borrow?
  • tintinhopetintinhope Registered User Posts: 196 Junior Member
    mostly single child in wealthy family
  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan Registered User Posts: 11,910 Senior Member
    Well, there are an estimated 8.5 million USD millionaires outside the US.

    And you don't even need to be a millionaire. Half a million or even a quarter million in net worth (if you are willing to spend it all on college for a kid) is enough.
  • Marie28Marie28 Registered User Posts: 17 Junior Member
    edited July 2017
    happymomof1 my parents are not going to help with anything. If I can't get a scholarship then that would suck lol, but I don't think that out of all the scholarships available I can't qualify and obtain at least one.
    I already have the names of local and US companies where I can't get a loan, how much I need to borrow it's going to depend on where I decide to apply and enroll.
  • katliamomkatliamom Registered User Posts: 12,549 Senior Member
    edited July 2017
    " I already have the names of local and US companies where I can't get a loan, how much I need to borrow it's going to depend on where I decide to apply and enroll."

    Do you mean you already have names of companies where you CAN get a loan? And if so, please tell us what they are! I wasn't aware there were any US "companies" that give loans of tens of thousands of dollars to teenagers from other countries @-)
  • Marie28Marie28 Registered User Posts: 17 Junior Member
    Mpower, Citizens Bank and Global Student Loan Corporation.
  • b@r!um[email protected]!um Registered User Posts: 10,376 Senior Member
    edited July 2017
    As others have said, there's no secret funding source for college. Most international students attending expensive US universities are indeed paying 6-digit sums for that privilege.

    That said, a number of colleges do give financial aid to international applicants. You will find a much larger range of options if you expand your geographic scope beyond California.
    Mpower, Citizens Bank and Global Student Loan Corporation.
    Are you sure that those are real options for you?

    Mpower does not fund beginning college students. Citizens Bank seems to require a US cosigner. Global Student Loan Corp - while not requiring a American cosigner - does require a cosigner who can put up collateral for the loan, such a lien on piece of real estate. Their "student loans" are just mortgages in disguise. (If you do have a cosigner who's willing to risk losing their house for your education, you'd get a much better interest rate if your cosigner just took out a regular mortgage without GSLC in the picture.)
This discussion has been closed.